Sabtu, 30 Juni 2012

How to Rehome a Moluccan Cockatoo

How to Rehome a Moluccan Cockatoo

Moluccan cockatoos are the largest of the cockatoos, reaching 20 inches to 24 inches long. They are beautiful, striking birds, and easily attract people to them, especially when they are smaller babies. Sadly, these are very intelligent, affectionate birds that often do not fare well in the average home setting. They become very attached to their owners, and are extremely noisy and demanding. Though they bond closely to their owner, they don't always like children or other family members. They need lots of time and attention, as well as exercise outside the cage. Some enthusiasts consider Moluccan cockatoos the most difficult to live with as pets. They become destructive, aggressive, noisy and self-injurious if not provided the correct environment. If you are in this sad predicament, the worst thing to do is randomly sell the bird to the first buyer without consideration for its needs or the needs of the buyer.

Instructions

    1

    Consider whether there is anything that can be done to enable you to keep your cockatoo. Rehoming will be very traumatic for your bird, and it will be hard to find it a new home that meets its needs. Perhaps you can have the flight wings clipped, and turn one room of your house into a bird-safe room for the cockatoo to have more exercise time.

    2
    Moluccan cockatoos are affectionate and social, which can cause trouble when owners leave for work.
    Moluccan cockatoos are affectionate and social, which can cause trouble when owners leave for work.

    Contact as many avian rescues as you can find, regardless of their distance from you. There are many rescues and sanctuaries, but not all will have room and not all can accept very large birds, like the Moluccan. One to try that does accept Moluccans when there is room is the Cockatoo Rescue and Sanctuary near Seattle. If they cannot accept your bird, perhaps they can connect you to someone who can. Another to try is Feathered Friends Sanctuary & Rescue in Edgerton, Wis.

    3

    Ask a local avian rescue to help you if you decide to place your bird privately. An experienced avian rescue can help you screen the prospective homes, educate a prospective adopter and help you make the best decision. Don't attempt to sell or place your bird without advice from an avian rescue society.

Lory Parrot Information on Talking, Care and Colors

Lory Parrot Information on Talking, Care and Colors

Lories are an especially beautiful and sociable group of true parrots. Their colorful personalities and plumage make them particularly desirable as pets, but their physical and social needs make them unsuitable for many households.

Temperament

    Lories rely on climbing more than flying.
    Lories rely on climbing more than flying.

    All 56 known species of lory parrots are highly social. They live in enormous flocks with constant interaction. Lories rely on climbing more than flying. They are non-stop talkers who are extremely curious and must inspect everything. They need social and intellectual stimulation every waking hour. These are not birds to leave alone in a cage.

Talking

    Lories eat nectar, never seeds.
    Lories eat nectar, never seeds.

    Lory parrots are exceptional mimics. They learn to copy human speech, as well as other noises, and have a reputation for chattering constantly in the wild and in captivity.

Diet

    Some bird owners find lory poop especially challenging.
    Some bird owners find lory poop especially challenging.

    Lories are nectarivores. Their diet in the wild is nectar, pollen, and flowers, and only incidentally other foods like fruit or bugs. In captivity, lories are fed nectar substitute or a solid pellet. Pet lories should be fed a specialized zoo-grade lory feed only.

Sanitation

    Lories need a highly specialized, zoo-grade diet.
    Lories need a highly specialized, zoo-grade diet.

    Lories have a liquid diet and as such, liquid stool. This poses sanitation challenges somewhat different from other pet birds. All enclosures and furniture require thorough, regular cleaning, and should also be sanitized. Consult an experienced avian veterinarian for bird-safe sanitizers.

Colors

    A lonely lory is a terrible thing.
    A lonely lory is a terrible thing.

    Lories are some of the most colorful parrots in the world. They are sometimes classified by size as "lories" and "lorikeets." All species have multicolored plumage, ranging from bright reds, greens, and yellows, to deep purples and blues.

Acquiring Your Lory

    If you decide a lory (or, preferably, lories) is right for you, be sure to get yours from a bird rescue or a breeder. Capture and importation from the wild is not only illegal, it is responsible for severely damaging and destroying entire populations of the beautiful parrots you love so much.

How to Make Your Own Bird Treat Stick

How to Make Your Own Bird Treat Stick

Whether you are giving a special treat to your pet bird at home or you want to give the birds outside a taste of luxury, there is no need to rush to the pet store. Make a bird treat stick at home that your pet will relish and the birds outside will devour. As long as you have birdseed and peanut butter, you can make this homemade delicacy in no time at all.

Instructions

    1

    Break off any small twigs sticking out of the stick so the surface is mostly smooth.

    2

    Tie a string securely around the stick. Find a temporary place to hang the stick while you prepare it for your bird, such as the knob of a kitchen cabinet.

    3

    Spread peanut butter over the stick, leaving spaces for the birds to perch without getting their feet sticky.

    4

    Pour birdseed into a bowl and dip the peanut butter-covered stick into the birdseed until it is completely covered.

    5

    Hang the treat stick in your bird's cage or outside on a tree, depending on the intended recipient of the treat.

Baby Cockatoo Behavior

Baby Cockatoo Behavior

The cockatoo is from Australia and the East Indies. This beautiful bird is highly social, but does not speak as much as other species of parrots. Most say a few words, but many never talk at all. The cockatoo lives more than 60 years, requires a great deal of attention and responsibility and is not for first-time bird owners. Baby cockatoos are known for their loving disposition and personalities.

Baby Characteristics

    Baby cockatoos are known for their sweet, loving nature. They like to be hand fed, talked to and snuggled with. Baby cockatoos are extremely intelligent and can quickly figure out tricks, take apart toys and open their cage doors. However, similar to a 2-year-old child, cockatoos also go through the "terrible 2s." He'll become bold and curious, exploring and investigating everything by tasting or destroying your windowsill, pillow or couch.

Adolescent Characteristics

    As he matures, he'll challenge your authority and crave more attention. As your baby cockatoo grows into an adolescent, he should be taught to play on his own. Set rules for him and adhere to them. Cockatoos are the noisiest of all parrots and have a need to scream for 20 minutes at a time. They can be manipulative, demanding, destructive and even dangerous. They must be trained and supervised at all times when out of their cage. If they are upset or stressed, they're known for self-mutilating themselves.

Toys

    Cockatoos are curious and become easily bored. Your baby cockatoo will need toys to keep him interested and out of trouble. Choose toys that have interesting colors and shapes, but beware of toys that contain a lot of dye, since cockatoos are notorious for chewing. Periodically rearrange their toys to keep them alert, and provide them with a trapeze or ring swing.

Food

    Baby cockatoos love warm, moist foods. Offer him parrot pellets soaked in warm fruit juice, cooked oatmeal or mashed sweet potato for the first few days. Choose warm corn and peas, pasta, rice, chunks of carrots, squash or sweet potatoes and cold green vegetables such as broccoli, kale, collard greens and spinach. Replace the dish of soft food when he's done, and keep a dish of avian pellets and crunchy, unsweetened dry cereal in the cage at all times. Do not feed him too much fruit - they are the equivalent of bird candy. Cockatoos eat as a family. Feed him during family mealtimes and you will give him a sense of security, making him feel like a member of the flock.

Jumat, 29 Juni 2012

What to Feed a Black Crow

What to Feed a Black Crow

While most baby birds that are abandoned by their parents or fall from the nest will die in human care, many rescuers have seen success when attempting to raise orphaned black crows. These birds are willing eaters and can be cared for easily. Do not feed adult crows as this may upset the local ecosystem, and only feed a baby crow if you are certain that its parents are dead. Release baby crows after caring for them for eight weeks.

Feeding Facts

    Crows are omnivores, meaning they eat meat and plants. Since crows are scavengers, they will eat almost anything you present to them. In the wild, a large part of a crow's diet consists of insects. Adult crows will even scavenge from garbage cans in urban settings. If you want to attract crows to your area, you can scatter unshelled peanuts in your lawn, upon which crows will readily feed.

Diet

    Feed oatmeal to a baby crow that you are trying to rescue to provide fiber and carbohydrates. Give the bird cooked ground beef heart for protein, as this lean meat is a good substitute for insects. Boil an egg and remove the yolk, as this will give the bird additional protein and nutrients. Purchase from a pet store a powder vitamin supplement that is high in protein and designed for birds. Combine the oatmeal, beef, egg yolk and a sprinkle of vitamin powder to make a mash and feed it to the crow.

Feedings

    Baby birds need to be fed manually, as they will not pick up food from the ground. When the birds are hungry, they will sit with their heads up and their mouths open. In the wild, their parents regurgitate food from their foraging into the babies' mouths. Reproduce this process by placing gobs of the food mixture on your finger and placing it in the crows' mouths. Gently push the food all the way down into the birds' throats to encourage them to swallow. At 5 to 6 weeks of age, crows will begin to eat by themselves.

Age

    Whether or not you can successfully feed and raise a crow depends on the age of the bird when you first encounter it. Usually, only baby crows that are younger than 3 to 4 weeks can be fed and cared for by humans. Prior to a month of age, baby birds have not yet imprinted on a caregiver and can still become tame and taught to embrace human care.

How to Get My Cockatiel to Drink His Water

How to Get My Cockatiel to Drink His Water

Cockatiels, like many types of birds, can sometimes be tricky pets to keep. A bird that has stopped drinking water can be a serious problem because of the risk of dehydration. He may be sick or he may be feeling uncomfortable or unsafe. However, you can take a few steps to see if you can get your bird to start drinking again.

Instructions

    1

    Wait for your bird to become comfortable. If you just got your bird, or you have just introduced him into a new cage or environment, he may be too uncomfortable to eat or drink at first. Give him a few days to settle in, and see if he starts drinking again.

    2

    Make sure your bird's water is fresh. Birds can be picky eaters and may decide not to drink their water if it is not clean and fresh. Clean the water dish and change the water daily. Used bottled or filtered water for your bird's water supply.

    3

    Avoid putting vitamins in your bird's water dish. Although it may seem like a good idea to add vitamins to your bird's water, they can cause bacteria to grow in the dish. This will make the water taste bad to your cockatiel. They also may make the water slimy, which may cause a bird to stop drinking.

    4

    Note your bird's favorite spot in his cage, the place where he spends most of his time. Place a water dish in that area. Oftentimes, birds may have trouble finding the water dish if they are in a new area.

    5

    Place a second water dish in the cage. Again, birds may have trouble finding the water dish, so try placing it in different areas on different levels of the cage in the hope that your bird will see it and start drinking.

    6

    Sit with your bird and drink a glass of water or eat a snack. Birds are social creatures and feel most comfortable when they get to eat and drink in a flock scenario. Since you are his flock, eating and drinking with your bird at regular meal times may make him feel comfortable enough to drink on his own.

    7

    Bring your cockatiel to a veterinarian if he is still not drinking after you've tried these tricks. If your bird goes too long without water, he can face dehydration, which can cause severe problems and threaten the bird's life.

How to Build a Finch House

Finches are social songbirds that travel in pairs or small flocks. Depending on where you live, you may be able to attract several types of finches to a bird house. Finches are relatively easy to attract because, depending on the species, they will nest almost anywhere. They also come in many bright colors and have a variety of beautiful songs, making them fun to watch.

Instructions

    1

    Cut a 6-by-6 inch floor and four sides about six to eight inches tall and wide.

    2

    Cut a hole in one board about four to seven inches in diameter for the finches to enter. Add ventilation holes in the other boards so the baby birds will not suffocate if the finches build a nest inside the house.

    3

    Nail the walls and floor together. Add a hinged roof, which will help you access the house when you need to clean or add bird feed.

    4

    Add some grass, leaves and twigs to the bottom of the house so the finches can build a nest.

Types of Large Domestic Birds

Types of Large Domestic Birds

When the average person thinks of a domestic bird, chances are the first thing that comes to mind is a smaller species; something under 6 inches, such as a finch, canary or parakeet. However, there are a number of larger species that are commonly domesticated as pets.

Blue and Yellow Macaw

    The blue and yellow macaw is one of the six birds representing the macaw family. Common throughout South America, this bird is sometimes also spotted in Panama. Its average size is between 76 and 86cm and it weighs up to 1300g. Common physical characteristics include bright yellow plumage, largely on the front and underside, and bright blue on the back and wings. A short, black curving beak gives way to a zebra-like face of white and black feathers. This bird usually keeps a single mate for life. In the wild, these birds feed mainly on palm fruit and tree shoots. Be careful with these birds during mating season as they can become aggressive.

Moluccan Cockatoo

    The moluccan cockatoo, otherwise known as the salmon-crested cockatoo, is native to Eastern Indonesia. With an average size of 52cm, these birds can weigh up to 1000g. Physical characteristics include a white and light pink body with a crest of orange and red feathers that stand up vertically when the bird is aggressive or frightened. These birds are often found in lowland forests. The moluccan's diet is made up of coconuts, insects and larvae, berries, seeds and nuts. Though these birds are now bred in captivity, it's important to understand that the moluccan is listed on the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES).

Emerald Toucanet

    The emerald toucanet is native to Central America and western South America. Its average size is between 30 and 35cm and weight is 800g. Physical characteristics include a bright green body, black and yellow bill rimmed at its base with a thin strip of white and grayish legs. These birds usually are found in pairs and are rarely seen on the ground. Their diet includes worms, larvae and fruits. Toucans are known to be argumentative, especially when their flying space is limited.

How to Handle a Cockatoo

How to Handle a Cockatoo

Some cockatoos like Moluccan Cockatoos and Umbrella Cockatoos love to be handled by their owners. They raise their crests, flap their wings, dance and scream happily in the hands of their owners when played with properly. Play time can be just as enjoyable for you, if you just take the time to practice safety, relax and let the bird be your guide regarding how he wants to play.

Instructions

    1

    The first safety rule when handling cockatoos is keep them away from your face. Facial bites are painful but can be prevented by keeping the cockatoo off your shoulder and holding it at waist level at all times. Extend your arm all the way out when the bird is performing, and lightly put your thumb on its toes to remind it who is in control.

    2

    The second safety rule is to keep your energy levels calm. Cockatoos can see your excitement and get excited themselves. If a cockatoo taps its beak on your hand or arm, set it down gently but quickly. Cockatoos sometimes use this to signal hyperactivity and may follow this behavior with a painful bite. Remain calm and your cockatoo will, too.

    3

    Handle the bird with your opposite hand. So if you are right handed, handle the bird with your left. This helps you build confidence in yourself and stifle fears of being bitten on your primary hand. You should, however, eventually learn to use both hands to handle your cockatoo.

    4

    Be flexible and go with the flow. If your cockatoo wants to swing, then you should swing him. And be gentle, yet confident in your approach as you both learn how to play with each other. Learn your cockatoo's playful habits and tendencies. If it clamps onto your wrist to help keep its balance, take note of this for future reference, so you'll remember what to expect and try to help it stay balanced.

How to Care for a Show Chicken

How to Care for a Show Chicken

Caring for a show chicken can be a rewarding experience. However, if you are not familiar with raising chickens, the task of caring for one may be daunting. There are so many facets to consider, such as cleaning, feeding and preparing it for competition. But once you learn a few basic skills and experience some time with your show chicken, you may find caring for one easier than you assumed.

Instructions

Washing Tips

    1

    Wash your chicken in an area with a room temperature between 80 and 90 degrees Fahrenheit. Exposing a wet chicken to temperatures outside of this range can kill it.

    2

    Measure the water temperature when washing the chicken. The water temperature should be approximately 95 degrees Fahrenheit. Rinse the chicken in water that is room temperature.

    3

    Rub the chicken gently with a cloth towel after washing. This will likely leave the chicken slightly damp. Allow the moist plumage to air dry in a room with a temperature that ranges from 85 to 95 degrees Fahrenheit. Avoid exposing your chicken to temperatures that exceed 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

    4

    Apply baby or vitamin E oil to the comb, wattle, beak and shanks of the chicken using a cloth rag, after the chicken is completely dry. Do not allow any oil to get into the feathers.

    5

    Trim the toe nails regularly using a pair of nail clippers. File the nails into arches using a nail file.

Feeding Tips

    6

    Allow your chicken to have access to clean water at all times. Dehydration can cause your chicken to get sick and possibly die. From birth to six weeks, give your baby chick water in a shallow pan to prevent it from drowning.

    7

    Provide your chicken with the adequate amount of protein. As a chick, from birth to six weeks, your chickens diet should have an approximate protein ratio of 18 to 20 percent. From six weeks on, the protein ratio should range from 12 to 14 percent.

    8

    Mix sand or parakeet gravel into the starter feed for your baby chicks. Adult chickens should have access to small rocks and pebbles. Chickens eat pebbles to help them digest their food.

Competition Tips

    9

    Transport your chicken in a sturdy, but light, cage. Place clean, dry straw inside in the cage to provide bedding. Do not put water inside the transport cage as it will likely spill, staining your chicken in the process.

    10

    Provide your chicken with ample feed and water during the competition. Chickens are self-regulated feeders, so if your chicken does not eat, assume it is not hungry.

    11

    Quarantine your chicken for two weeks after a competition. Your chicken will be exposed to other chickens, people and environments which may harbor disease, parasites and bacteria. Make sure your chicken is healthy before allowing it to come in contact with your other show chickens.

Kamis, 28 Juni 2012

How to Make a Male Canary Sing

How to Make a Male Canary Sing

The male canary is known for his exuberant lilting song. Only male canaries sing, so often when a new pet canary won't sing it's because the bird was misidentified and is really a female. It's impossible to tell the sex of a canary by sight, and females are often accidently sold as males. Male canaries will also stop singing during molting season and sometimes are reluctant to sing again when molting is completed. And some young birds may need to be taught to sing. There are steps you can take to encourage your male canary to sing.

Instructions

    1

    Determine the age of the bird. Most male canaries won't sing until they are 6 months old. If the bird is young, be patient. If the bird is new to the environment, it might take it a couple weeks to be comfortable enough to sing. Many birds will also stop singing when they get to be 10 years or older.

    2

    Move the canary to an individual cage. Male canaries are more prone to sing when they are housed alone. Some will sing almost continuously when kept in an individual cage. The cage should be at least 16 by 16 inches in size.

    3

    Place the cage up high in a well-lit room.

    4

    Keep the bird cool and limit exposure to artificial light at night. Canaries molt once a year, usually in the summer. The male canary will stop singing when molting and won't begin again until all its feathers have been replaced --- usually after about two months. Molting is triggered by heat and longer periods of daylight. Some birds will molt more often and out of season. This is usually caused by heat and artificial light. Keep the canary in a cool room and cover its cage at sunset, especially in the winter, to prevent excessive molting.

    5

    Play canary training tapes. Tapes and CDs of canaries singing can be used to encourage a reluctant canary to sing. The sound of other birds often stimulates song.

    6

    Play classical music on the stereo in the canary's room. Sometimes the sound of music will coax a canary into song.

    7

    Feed your canary extra protein. Egg biscuits can support the canary through the molting process by supplying him with extra protein. Biscuits are available at pet stores. Soak biscuits in water before serving them to the bird.

    8

    Check your canary's weight. Gently hold the bird and feel its chest. If the rib bones are protruding, it's too thin. Canaries need more than just birdseed for optimum health. A too-thin bird will stop singing. Convert the bird to pellet feed supplemented with egg biscuits to help it gain weight.

    9

    Check the bird for a respiratory infection. A respiratory infection will keep the bird from singing. These infections can be caused by a virus, fungus, bacteria or by parasites. An avian veterinarian will need to determine the cause of the infection for proper treatment.

    10

    Check the bird's toenails. Canaries' toenails can grow too long, making it painful for them to perch. An avian vet can trim the nails to make the bird more comfortable.

How to Take Care of a Blue Crown Conure

How to Take Care of a Blue Crown Conure

Blue crown conures, more formally known as blue-crowned conures, became popular pets thanks to the movie "Paulie." Parrots have long lifespans, and blue-crowned conures typically live to be between 20 and 30 years old, so make sure you're ready to commit to taking care of one for its entire life before bringing one home. Parrots become attached to their owners, and selling or giving one up results in extreme stress for the parrot.



Blue-crowned conures can learn to talk, but you should never choose a parrot based on its talking ability; instead, select a parrot based on your compatibility with the parrot's personality. With proper socialization and attention, blue-crowned conures make entertaining and lively family pets.

Instructions

    1

    Purchase a suitable cage for your blue-crowned conure. The cage should be at least 24 inches by 22 inches. Blue-crowned conures are slightly larger than most other conure species, so it's a good idea to get a cage slightly larger than the recommended minimum. The bar spacing should be 5/8 to 3/4 of an inch, and the top of the cage should be no higher than the top of your head.

    Cages with bowl-holders, preferably three (one each for seed/fresh fruits and vegetables, pellets, and water), are the safest for your blue-crowned conure. Keeping bowls in all bowl-holders at all times, even when not in use, will prevent your blue-crowned conure from injuring itself if it tries to escape. Built-in bowl-holders also make it easier to remove bowls for cleaning and feeding, as you don't have to open the cage door to remove them.

    2

    Purchase at least three perches in different sizes, styles and materials, and set them up in your blue-crowned conure's cage. A variety of perches ensures that there isn't always pressure on the same part of your conure's feet, which can lead to atrophy or injury over time.

    Perches are usually labeled according to the size or type of parrot for which they're intended. Perches labeled medium to small, or perches that are 1/2 to 1 inch in diameter, will provide a nice variety for your blue-crowned conure. To ensure your conure's comfort, check that its feet wrap about two-thirds of the way around the perch.

    3

    Purchase toys for your blue-crowned conure's cage. It's a good idea to keep three or four toys in the cage at all times to alleviate boredom and prevent bad habits such as screaming and feather-picking. Toys labeled for small to medium parrots are the best size for blue-crowned conures. Always be sure to buy safe, non-toxic toys specifically for parrots.

    4

    Feed your blue-crowned conure a balanced diet. A balanced diet consists of a seed mixture formulated for conures, pellets, and fresh fruits and vegetables. The seed mixture should contain sunflower and safflower seeds and dried fruits and vegetables. Fresh fruits and vegetables should be offered daily, as they are vital to keeping your parrot healthy and provide far more vitamins and minerals than seed mixtures, but they should be removed after a few hours so that they do not spoil. Some parrot owners remove the parrot's seed and replace it with fruits and vegetables for those few hours to encourage the parrot to try the different food.

    Some nutritious foods you can try feeding your blue-crowned conure include: apples, peaches, pears, bananas, grapes, strawberries, mangos, melons, oranges, pineapples, broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, potatoes, sweet potatoes, zucchini, brown rice, whole wheat noodles, oatmeal and a tiny amount of natural yogurt.

    5

    Provide your blue-crowned conure with fresh water, changed every day.

    6

    Spend time with your blue-crowned conure every day. This is vital to keeping your conure happy and well-behaved, and it will prevent or eliminate bad habits such as screaming and feather-picking. An hour outside the cage, socializing with family members, is ideal, but at least 30 minutes a day is necessary.

    7

    Find a bird-groomer and a veterinarian who specializes in parrots, and keep their contact information on hand in case of an emergency. Schedule regular appointments to keep your blue-crowned conure's nails and wings trimmed (a lot can go wrong here, so it's best to let a professional groom your parrot), and schedule a check-up with the veterinarian to ensure your parrot is in good health.

Rabu, 27 Juni 2012

Homemade Bird Aviaries

Homemade Bird Aviaries

Pet birds in the parrot family, including cockatiels, cockatoos, and macaws, have very long lifespans and are extremely intelligent animals. Because of this, owners can become quite emotionally attached to their pet birds. One way to increase your bond with your birds is to hand-make an aviary for your pets--a labor of love that will create a structure both you and your birds will enjoy.

Types of Aviaries

    Depending on your living situation, you can choose to make an indoor or outdoor aviary. Making an indoor aviary is less costly because you dont have to worry about protecting the birds from the weather, predators, or the possibility of escape. Indoor aviaries can consist of wire mesh and wood, and the floor can be covered with a removable lining.

    Outdoor aviaries, although more expensive and elaborate, can benefit your birds by giving them sunlight and fresh air. Your pets will also enjoy being in a more natural environment. Before beginning an outdoor aviary project, check with your local homeowners association and city zoning laws to make sure your structure is permissible.

Benefits of Aviaries

    Indoor and outdoor homemade aviaries offer several benefits. As social animals, your birds will be able to interact with each other much better in a large structure. If you have different species, this arrangement will allow them to be housed in one place (assuming they get along).

    For animals that live so long, having access to more space will improve their overall quality of life. Being confined to a small cage for 20, 30, or more years can be detrimental. With added space you can also include more toys and games for intellectual stimulation. Additionally, if the aviary is large enough, your pets will be able to fly. Flying is great exercise and something every bird desires to do.

Building Your Aviary

    For both indoor and outdoor aviaries, make sure that the wire and wood you use is safe for birds that may chew on them. If you choose an indoor aviary, you can use a corner or alcove in your home for two or three of the walls. The floor can be covered with linoleum or some other easily removable surface.

    Outdoor aviaries can have concrete or dirt floors, but dirt floors can harbor bacteria and parasites. When building outside, you have to provide shelter from the elements and offer safeguards against various predators. The wire you choose has to be both non-toxic and thick enough so that your species of bird cant chew through it. You will also need to include a special entryway so your birds dont escape when you enter it.

    When you make your aviarys plans, take into consideration the size of your bird(s). The width of your aviary should be two to three times the wingspan, the length should be about six times the birds body length, and the height should be approximately four times the birds body.

How to Feed Pumpkin Seeds to Parrots

How to Feed Pumpkin Seeds to Parrots

Parrots are considered tropical birds. Although their base color is green, parrot feathers are made up of many bright colors. Another feature you will find on a parrot is a curved bill. If you own a parrot, you will need to be aware of the types of foods parrots like to eat. This includes fruit, plant materials, nuts and seeds. Pumpkin seeds make for an especially tasty treat.

Instructions

    1

    Scoop the seeds out of the pumpkin with a large spoon. You can also use your fingers if you don't mind the slimy feel.

    2

    Place the pumpkin seeds in a strainer. Rinse and remove any strands of pulp from around the pumpkin seeds under running water.

    3

    Lay the pumpkin seeds on a few paper towels. Place a few more paper towels on top of the pumpkin seeds, and press down to dry them.

    4

    Transfer the pumpkin seeds to a baking sheet. Bake in the oven at 375 degrees Fahrenheit for a half hour. Toss often to prevent the seeds from sticking to the baking sheet.

    5

    Wait for the pumpkin seeds to cool off. Set a few pumpkin seeds in your parrot's feeder each day. Store the remaining seeds in an airtight container.

How to Tell a Male Green Cheeked Conure From a Female

How to Tell a Male Green Cheeked Conure From a Female

The green cheeked conure is a type of parrot in the same family as the macaw, cockatoo, lorie, lorikeet, parakeet and others. Conures are long-tailed, small to mid-sized New World parrots that come from South and Central America and Mexico. The green cheeked conure belongs to the genus Pyrrhura and are smaller than some other varieties of conures. Characterized by scalloped chest feathers, wide eye rings, black beaks, brown eyes, dark green bodies, red tail feathers and pink feet, the green cheeked conure is a beautiful bird. Males and females have similar physical characteristics and are nearly impossible to tell apart.

Instructions

    1

    Order a DNA testing kit specifically for testing birds from a company such as Avian Biotech (Avianbiotech.com). You will need one kit per bird.

    2

    Remove a couple chest feathers from your parrot or clip a toenail far enough back to produce blood. Removing chest feathers is a more humane way to test parrot DNA and is just as accurate as a blood test. Clipping a toenail will cause unnecessary stress and pain to your bird.

    3

    Follow the instructions included with the kit to properly return the DNA samples. Once you have made your collection and filled out the required information in the kit, return to the Avian Biotech website and download the submission form. Return the form with your sample along with a check or money order for $24.50 (price as of 2011). Avian Biotech will not perform a DNA test if payment is not received.

What Are Blue Parrots?

What Are Blue Parrots?

Blue parrots are parrots with predominantly blue plumage. Parrots are birds from the family Psittacidae that are native to warm climates. They have curved beaks and are zygodactyls, which means they have four toes on each foot; two point forward and two point backward. They are long lived, highly intelligent and come in a variety of colors and patterns. For most birds, feathers appear blue not because of pigmentation but because of the way light falls on the feathers.

Hyacinth Macaw

    The hyacinth macaw, at about 40 inches long, is the largest parrot. It is blue all over save for a bit of yellow at the lower mandible and around the eye. It is native to southern Brazil and western Bolivia where it roosts in palm trees near swamps, rivers and lakes. Hyacinth macaws are usually found in pairs or small family groups, and the female is smaller than the male. As a pet, it's gentle and affectionate with its owner but can be aggressive toward strangers. Its huge beak has a biting pressure of around 300 lbs. per square inch. It's prone to destroy its perches, which have to be replaced regularly. It eats fruit and grains and can be taught to speak. The hyacinth macaw is a rare and protected species.

The Bronze Winged Parrot

    The bronze winged parrot is about 11 inches long, and mostly navy blue, though it has a white patch on its throat, its forehead feathers have pink edges and the coverts under the tail are red. The bird has a pink ring around its eyes whose color deepens during the breeding season. The bronze wing parrot is native to the mountain forests of northwestern Venezuela, western Colombia, Ecuador and northwestern Peru. It lives in pairs or small flocks. As pets, bronze winged parrots are rather nervous and might preen each other's heads to the point where the feathers take a long time to grow back. They also eat fruits and grains and can be taught to speak.

The Scarlet Chested Parrot

    The scarlet chested parrot is an 8 1/2 inch bird with a sea blue head and neck, blue green wings with bright blue and black markings, a green tail with yellow and black markings. The male has a yellow underside with red throat and chest -- the female's throat and chest are yellow. The bird is native to dry scrubland in New South Wales and northern parts of south Australia. It's rare in the wild but now and then large flocks can be seen feeding on the ground. The bird can sing, and gets along with other birds. It eats grains and insects, as well as commercial egg or soft foods.

The Turquoise Parrot

    The turquoise parrot or turquoisine is an 8 1/2 inch parrot with a sky blue head, wings and feathers. It has a yellow and green tail and the males have red on the wings. The turquoisine also lives in pairs or small flocks in grassland and open woods and comes out at twilight. They're native to New South Wales, Australia. Like the scarlet chested parrot it sings and eats grains, insects, eggs and soft foods.

Zebra Finch Facts

Zebra Finch Facts

Zebra finches have been a popular pet bird for over 100 years, writes Hans-Jurgen Martin in Barron's "Zebra Finches." These are gray and brown finches with bright orange beaks, although many other colors including white can be found in pet stores.

Natural Habitat

    Zebra finches come from Australia and are found abundantly in most regions. They tend to stay in dry grassland habitats.

Diet

    Wild zebra finches eat mostly grass seeds before they ripen, some insects and plant leaves. Martin recommends feeding pet zebra finches a variety of dry seeds, sprouted seeds, fruits and natural plants such as dandelion weeds and yarrow.

Behavior

    Gregarious and active are words usually used to describe the zebra finch, both in the wild and as a pet. To keep these birds happy and healthy as pets, Martin recommends always keeping at least two zebra finches together in a cage that is not less than 28 inches in length.

Selasa, 26 Juni 2012

Differences Between Lutino & Albino Parakeets

Differences Between Lutino & Albino Parakeets

The parakeet is a common pet bird, part of the parrot family. Parakeets are native to Australia; after Europeans discovered them in the 1860s, Australia began exporting them as pets. The parakeet can be found in many different eye colors as well as feather colors and patterns; two types of these variations lutino and albino.

Lutino parakeet

    Lutinos are parakeets that are completely yellow and have red or pink eyes. Most parakeets have black eyes. The term "lutino" refers to any bird, fish or animal that is mostly yellow in color. These birds are the same as other parakeets except for the feather and eye color.

    Telling the gender of an adult lutino parakeet is the same as with other parakeets. The cere, which is the membrane above the beak where the nostrils are located, is blue or purple in the male and the female's is brown.

Albino

    Albino parakeets are all-white with red or pink eyes. As with the lutinos, they are the same as any other parakeets with the exception of the feather and eye color. The gender can also be identified by the cere --- the band above the beak containing the nostrils --- in the same manner. Albinos occur in all animals, birds and even fish. The term refers to the absence of color or pigment in the skin, feathers or scales and albinos always have red or pink eyes.

Breeding

    Male parakeets have two Z chromosomes and females have a Z and a W chromosome. The lutino/albino trait is carried on the Z chromosome, meaning it is a sex-linked mutation. Since two birds that are not lutino or albino can produce offspring that are lutino or albino, the gene is known as a "recessive gene." In order to be certain the breeding pair will produce lutinos or albinos, the breeder must mate two visually lutino or albino birds.

Care

    A lutino or albino parakeet requires no special care. They need clean food and water daily and should be offered a variety of fruits and vegetables, along with the normal seed diet, just as with blue, green or purple parakeets.

History

    In the wild, parakeets are green and yellow. As traders started selling them for pets, breeders began to breed mutations to get a variety of colors. The lutino and albino parakeet do occur in the wild when the recessive genes surface.

Male Vs. Female Indian Ringneck

Male Vs. Female Indian Ringneck

The Indian ringneck is a member of the parakeet family which originated in India, but it is also native to Asia and Africa. There are many mutations of color in the ringnecks including pastel shades of lime, yellow and blue with variations on each. The Indian ringneck is an elegant, poised and intelligent bird.

Physical Difference Between Male and Female

    Ringnecks in the wild
    Ringnecks in the wild

    The black ring around the neck that denotes a male ringneck will not be visible until about 17 months of age. Females may have rings but they are light and hard to see. One way to tell a male from a female is to place the bird in front of a mirror and watch their behavior. A male will open his wings and bow. A female will not. Female ringnecks have a more rounded face, smaller beak and thicker feet. They tend to be more stocky than their male counterpart. The male head is more square, the color around the face brighter and his tail slightly longer.

Male vs. Female as Pets

    The female bird is generally thought to be a better pet. The male may be more aggressive in nature. Either male or female can become excellent pets with training and socialization. Both can be taught to speak. Ringneck vocabulary has been documented at up to 250 words. They can learn tricks like untying knots and putting beads on a string.

Behavior Patterns of Indian Ringnecks

    Jealousy is a major issue with the Indian ringneck. They tend to bond with only one member of the household and will become aggressive and even attack others who they perceive to be a threat. They may not get along with other household pets. Chewing is a cause for concern with any parrot but the ringneck can be very destructive. Adequate toys must be provided to satisfy their need to chew.

Breeding the Indian Ringneck

    Indian ringnecks breed well in captivity. Sexual maturity is reached at 18 months, but breeding may not occur until they are two or three years. Ringnecks breed better in open flight cages since they are strong flyers but need to be kept as separate pairs. They are not known for fidelity to their mates and may decide to switch partners.

Word of Warning

    Indian ringnecks have very loud screams and will become annoyingly verbal if neglected. These birds must be handled on a regular basis or they will revert to their wild nature and can inflict painful bites.

Senin, 25 Juni 2012

What Kind of Vegetables Can You Feed an Umbrella Cockatoo?

What Kind of Vegetables Can You Feed an Umbrella Cockatoo?

Vegetables aren't just an important part of our diets; they're an important part of your umbrella cockatoo's diet, too. A variety of vegetables can help ensure that your umbrella cockatoo remains healthy. And if your feathered friend doesn't like fresh vegetables, you can try several alternatives which might appeal to its tastes.

Vegetables

    Umbrella cockatoos can eat just about any of the vegetables that humans eat. Dark green vegetables such as broccoli, green beans and lettuce, and orange vegetables such as carrots, pumpkin and squash are especially healthy. But don't neglect other vegetables, such as bean sprouts, cauliflower, celery, cucumbers, eggplants, peppers, tomatoes and zucchini. Feed spinach sparingly; it binds to calcium and prevents it from being absorbed by the body.

Benefits of Feeding Vegetables

    While most parrots, including umbrella cockatoos, love nuts and seeds, these foods contain little nutritional value. A diet high in nuts and seeds can lead to deficiencies in vitamins and minerals, which can lead to health and behavioral problems such as feather picking. Offering umbrella cockatoos a variety of vegetables on a daily basis ensures they get the additional nutrition they need.

Alternatives to Fresh Vegetables

    Umbrella cockatoos can be picky eaters, so if yours is not used to eating vegetables, you might have trouble getting it to eat them. Try offering your umbrella cockatoo human baby food, or give it cooked or steamed vegetables. Some umbrellas prefer dried vegetables; just be careful not to purchase ones preserved with sulfur dioxide; parrots can be allergic to it, which which can lead to aggressiveness, feather-picking and hyperactivity.

Vegetables and Other Foods to Avoid

    You should not feed your umbrella cockatoo onion or rhubarb. Avocado, fruit seeds, chocolate, and anything containing alcohol and caffeine should also not be fed to cockatoos. These foods will most likely result in the death of your parrot.

Suggestions for Macaw Bird Names

Suggestions for Macaw Bird Names

As the lifespan of a macaw parrot is up to 60 years in the wild and over 100 in captivity, you'll want to pick a name that he, and you, will not tire of for some time. Take into consideration the personality of your new parrot, and see if any names suggest themselves. It's a good idea to get to know your bird for a week or so before assigning him a permanent name.

Famous Parrots and Birds

    Winston Churchill purchased Charlie from a previous owner in 1937.
    Winston Churchill purchased Charlie from a previous owner in 1937.

    Alex, the famed African grey parrot belonging to Dr. Irene Pepperberg, and Einstein, another African grey are both known for their speaking abilities. Ping Pong, a blue-fronted Amazon parrot lives with actress Elizabeth Hurley and is possibly most famous for being a parrot with his own Twitter account. For a classic name with historical merit, Charlie is a blue macaw that used to belong to Winston Churchill. The parrot is known for his bad moods, foul language and for his age; in 2009 Charlie was over 107 years old.

Fictional Birds

    For the more literary-minded, a nod to classic and contemporary literature could be a good starting place for a macaw name. Quoth, in homage to Poe, is the name of a loquacious raven in several of British satirist Terry Pratchett's books, and could well suit a talkative macaw parrot. Lory is a clever and persistent parrot character that Lewis Carroll wrote into the Alice in Wonderland series to represent Lorina Liddell. For the fans of popular children's literature, Fawkes the phoenix from the Harry Potter series is selfless and brave -- a great name for a large and docile macaw. For a great pet's name, often all one needs to do is select their favorite book from the shelf.

Color Themes

    There are 19 species of macaw and 35 hybrid varieties, all with different coloring.
    There are 19 species of macaw and 35 hybrid varieties, all with different coloring.

    Macaws are one of the most vibrant and colorful parrots in the world; as a new macaw owner, consider choosing a name that draws attention to his incredible plumage. Names such as Indigo, Scarlet and Azure are directly linked to your parrot's unique coloring, and provide a flashy moniker that can showcase his looks. Whether you're taking a more humorous tone, as with classic Crayola colors such as Burnt Sienna, or showing crossword knowledge with head-scratchers such as Feldgrau (a dark gray-green), a colorful name will stand out.

Classic Names

    With hard work, training and love, macaws can become fully-fledged family members.
    With hard work, training and love, macaws can become fully-fledged family members.

    Some parrot owners like to think of their bird as a companion in the home, and choose to go with classic "human" names for their feathered friend. You could choose a name from an era, such as Enid, Diana and Theodore from Edwardian times, or revered Roman names such as Marcus, Flavius or Caesar. You could go with contemporary names from popular culture such as Edward or Bella, or timeless classics such as David, James or Jennifer.

How to Raise Baby Chicks at Home

How to Raise Baby Chicks at Home

Raising baby chicks can be carried out successfully as long as the chicks are provided for in the correct way. It is important to keep the chicks in an environment with suitable heat. Chicks can be purchased from a hatchery and they can also be raised at home from the egg stage, but in order to hatch the eggs must be kept in an incubator for 21 days. Chicks can become stressed while being transported from the hatchery to their new home. Check for runny droppings sticking around the anus, which should be cleaned frequently to prevent illness.

Instructions

    1

    Keep the the chicks in a specialized breeder box , though you can also house them in an aquarium, which will be easy to keep clean. Round-based aquariums are more suitable for groups of five chicks or more as this will prevent any of the chicks being trapped in a corner by their siblings. Line the floor of the aquarium with newspaper. For the first week you should also cover the newspaper with a layer of paper towels or an old bath towel. This will help to prevent leg problems such as spraddle leg, which is caused by the chicks walking on a slippery surface.

    2

    Keep the chicks warm by placing a heating lamp directly over one end of the aquarium, as this allows the chicks to cool off at the other end if they feel overheated. Set the heat lamp to a temperature of 95 degrees F until the chicks are a week old, and then lower the temperature by five degrees every week until the chicks reach six weeks of age. At this point the chicks should have a complete covering of feathers and will be able to continue without the heat lamp. If the chicks can be heard making loud noises, this means they are too cold.

    3

    Ensure that water is always available for the chicks. Add a single tablespoon of sugar for the first day of feeding to act as an energy supplement. You may need to dip the chick's beak into the water so it will learn what it is. Feed the chicks on a specialized starter feed, which can be purchased from feed stores. When the chicks reach six weeks of age change to a pullet grower feed until 20 weeks of age. They can then be fed laying feed. In the case of an emergency, crushed hard-boiled egg yolk can be used to feed newly hatched chicks until the suitable feed can be acquired.

Sabtu, 23 Juni 2012

How to Make Your Parakeet Be Quiet at Night

How to Make Your Parakeet Be Quiet at Night

Many people enjoy parakeets for their colorful appearance and song. However, if your pet companion prefers to show off his singing talent during the night, it may affect your sleep. To correct this behavior or prevent it from happening, adjust your parakeet's sleep schedule so that it matches yours.

Instructions

    1

    Create a calm environment in the room that houses your parakeet. Avoid loud noises, play soft radio music and dim the lights before bedtime. According to the NetPets website, this helps your feathery friend to relax.

    2

    Provide a comfortable room temperature for your pet bird. Turn off any fans or air conditioners, and avoid placing your parakeet in drafty areas of the house. If the room's temperature is pleasant to you, it will be pleasant to your parakeet.

    3

    Cover your bird's cage with a cloth or commercial birdcage cover before going to bed. According to the Tri-State Budgerigar Society, covering the cage keeps the bird silent for a longer time in the morning.

    4

    Remove the birdcage cover in the morning to indicate to your bird that it's time to wake up.

How to Feed Lories

Lories and lorikeets are small- to medium-sized psittacine birds, closely related to parrots. Unlike parrots, they eat mostly nectar and pollen in the wild, along with some fruit and other foods. Lories have a brush-like tongue that is covered in long papillae, which are used to remove pollen from flowers. In captivity, lories are generally fed a commercial nectar product along with supplemental fruit. They are prone to gout, kidney and liver problems, and should therefore not be fed a high-protein diet. Some species also experience iron storage disease, so it is important to avoid foods that are high in iron.

Instructions

    1

    Offer your lory a nectar product that is formulated specifically for lories. Do not use hummingbird nectar or a homemade mixture. This nectar should make up approximately 80 to 90 percent of your lory's diet. Nectar mixtures can be fed wet or dry, but lories usually prefer wet. Dry nectar powder will make your lory's droppings firmer.

    2

    Offer a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables to your lory twice daily. Unlike most other birds, lories will usually crush fruit in their beak and drink the juice, rather than actually swallowing it. This can be quite messy, so be prepared to clean up the fruit and vegetable scraps from the cage and surrounding area.

    3

    Hang a cuttlebone in your lory's cage to provide additional minerals. Although lories consume less cuttlebone than other pet birds, they do benefit from the additional calcium.

    4

    Offer your lory a variety of healthy treats, such as sprouted seeds and fruit juice. Avoid dry seed, raisins, prunes, avocado and rhubarb, as these may cause health problems in lories and lorikeets.

    5

    Make a source of fresh, clean water available to your lory at all times. Because lories have a primarily liquid diet that adheres to their beak, their water becomes contaminated very easily. Consider offering a water bottle instead of a bowl to drink from, and place a separate container in the cage for bathing.

Jumat, 22 Juni 2012

How to Build a Wooden Parakeet Cage

How to Build a Wooden Parakeet Cage

Bird cages come in many sizes and styles. The most important consideration is to build one that is the correct size for the bird or birds who will live in it. Several different types of parakeets are kept as pet birds, with the Budgerigar being one of the more popular. These parakeets are small birds, 7 to 9 inches in length, and can live in a small wooden cage.

Instructions

    1

    Determine the cage's size. For one to two parakeets, a cage 18-by-18-by-24 inches high is adequate.

    2

    Cut two pieces of wood for the top and bottom. Cut a square of -inch plywood 18-by-18 inches with a circular saw.

    3

    Cut out frame for the bottom and top using 1-by-2 inch untreated wood, which is commonly used for woodwork trim. Cut four pieces 18-inches long and four pieces 14-inches long to be used for the top and bottom of the cage. The boards are 2 inches wide. In order to make an 18-inch square frame, you must trim the cross pieces of the frame. When laid out in the next step, the total width and length will be 18 inches on each side.

    4

    Screw the frame together. Using corner braces, screw the four pieces together at the corners. Lay the 18 inch pieces flat on the plywood and opposite each other. Lay the 14 inch pieces flat between the two long pieces. For example, the 18 inch pieces will be the on the right and left, the 14-inch pieces the top and bottom and between the longer pieces. Repeat the process for the top frame.

    5

    Glue the frame onto the plywood. Use nontoxic adhesive.

    6

    Cut the dowels in half. You will need approximately 36 per side, spaced inch apart.

    7

    Drill holes for the dowels. Measure in of an inch from the edge of each side of the frame and make a mark. Measure the middle of the each board and make a mark. Draw a line from the inch mark to the middle mark across each board. You should have a line horizontally across each side of the frame. Place another mark at inch intervals along the line. Using a 3/16-inch drill bit, drill a hole at each -inch mark. Mark the top frame the same and drill the holes.

    8

    Glue the dowels into the holes on the bottom. Allow to dry. Flip the bottom over and glue the dowels into the holes on the other frame. Allow to dry.

    9

    Place the frame with the dowels on top of the plywood and secure the bottom to the frame from the underside using -inch wood screws. Put the top piece of plywood onto the top frame and secure using -inch wood screws.

    10

    Cut the wire. Using 19-gauge stainless-steel wire cut eight pieces 20 inches long each. Starting on one of the sides 6 inches up, wrap one end of the wire on the first dowel and stretch the wire across the inside of the dowels to the other corner, stopping to wrap once around dowels every 4 inches. Do the same with the next piece around the cage. When the wire has encircled the cage at 6 inches, do the same 12 inches up each side of the cage. This wire will hold the perches and feed cups.

    11

    Cut out the door. On one of the sides, between the 6- and 12-inch wires, cut out a 5-inch span of the dowels using the wire cutter. You will now have a hole in the bars 5-by-6 inches.

    12

    Make the door. Cut two 7-inch-long pieces of the wire and cut 8-inch-long pieces of wire to string vertically to the 7-inch pieces. Wrap each end of the vertical bars around the 7-inch piece.

    13

    Place the door in the opening. Secure each end of the 7-inch horizontal pieces to the dowels by wrapping it loosely around to allow the door to slide up and down.

How to Care for a Baby Duckling

How to Care for a Baby Duckling

Baby ducklings can make lovely pets and according to duck expert Nancy Townsend of The Goose Mother.com, "They are very happy with most anything you provide as long as they can keep clean, well fed and be with you." Baby ducklings can be raised successfully on the farm or in an apartment with a few simple supplies and considerations.

Instructions

    1

    Prepare your duck habitat by placing straw or old towels in the container you have chosen.

    2

    Set the lamp outside the container and adjust it for comfort. Lamps with an adjustable neck work best, but you can also use a hot water bottle or hand warmers in a pinch as long as you cover them and the duckling can move away from the heat as necessary.

    3

    Fill the bird waterer and food container and place them in the nest box.

    4

    Place the duckling in the container and make sure you check the food and water twice daily. Provide water and food all day and never offer food without water. You can purchase a package of vitamins and electrolytes for the duckling at any feed store and add them to the water the first week to ensure that it gets a good start.

    5

    Bathe your duck when it is 2.5 weeks old by offering it a small container of water. A toddler-size pool or jumbo litter box works best. A bathtub or shower can also be used when the duck is fully feathered.

    6

    Take your duckling out daily to hold it and socialize with it.

How to Travel With Ducklings

How to Travel With Ducklings

Traveling with any pet can be stressful and messy, and the issues get even more complicated with those pets that cannot be house trained. Ducklings are fragile creatures and in order for them to travel safely, certain needs must be accommodated. Ensuring that the pets are comfortable with all of their needs met is the best way to guarantee an easier travel experience.

Instructions

    1

    Line cardboard box or dog cage with newspaper or a rubber mat. Ducks have delicate feet and should walk on flat surfaces, not cage wires.

    2

    Place deep dish in box and fill half-full with cold water. Ducklings need water; they may drink it or get into it for a mid-travel swim.

    3

    Tie or tape a plastic bag around posterior of each duckling if desired. Ducklings will poop on the journey, so be prepared to clean up frequently. To avoid a larger mess, try limiting the amount of food the ducklings consume up to eight hours before the journey.

    4

    Check on the ducklings frequently during the journey to ensure all is clean and safe.

Feeding Abandoned Baby Birds

Most wildlife societies do not recommend feeding abandoned baby birds without proper experience. This is because feeding them the wrong diet, or the right diet incorrectly, can kill the babies. According to Life 123, if you find a baby bird that is extremely weak, you may take emergency measures and feed it sugar water. You should immediately call a wildlife rescue center to aid you in caring for the bird. Remember, abandoned birds should be fed with the intent of growing healthy enough to live in the wild.

Instructions

    1

    Mix one teaspoon of sugar with four teaspoons of water.

    2

    Fill an eyedropper with the mixture. Be sure there are no air bubbles.

    3

    Gently place your hand over the bird's body and lift their neck up. If they have yet to open their mouth, gently tap on their beak. Be extremely gentle as baby birds are delicate.

    4

    Gently place the dropper in the bird's mouth behind their tongue. Be careful not to puncture the fragile skin of their neck.

    5

    Slowly and carefully squeeze in the mixture down the bird's throat pausing every few seconds.

    6

    Repeat the above steps every 15 minutes until you speak with a wildlife rescue agent. They will ask you to bring the bird to their center as soon as possible and instruct you further.

What to Do if Your Budgie Flies Away

What to Do if Your Budgie Flies Away

The budgie's curious, friendly and acrobatic. He loves to come out of his cage to play and follow you around the house. He's a little thing, too, and he can dash away through an open door or window, up a chimney flue or out a seemingly impassible crack. It's less frightening for you if you know what to do when your budgie flies away. You're going to want helpers.

Call and Follow

    Call out to your budgie as he's flying; it may cause him to stop. If not, follow him and try to see where he goes. If you lose sight of him among trees, look for movement inside the tree, rather than expecting him to be perched on an outer branch. Stop calling and see if he calls out to you. He's used to interacting with you; he may call to you if he's nearby.

Search Nearby

    If you've lost sight of him, get helpers and search within a 1-mile radius. Most budgies won't fly far before they stop from tiredness. Call out your bird's favorite words, then stop and listen for his reply. If he answers, stand still and see if he comes to you, then cautiously put out your hand for him to land on. Be patient and don't make sudden moves, just as you did when you approached him early in your bonding.

Open House

    Have someone stay at the house and leave a door and window open for him in case he does find his way back home. Maintain cell phone connections between searchers and home watchers so everyone can be alerted if he's found.

Bring Favorites

    Familiar things and people are most likely to entice your budgie. Bring his favorite person, his cage -- with his favorite birdie friend in it -- and his favorite food and dish, millet treats and toys. If your budgie is nearby, he may be able to see you but is afraid to come out. Have his favorite person sit quietly with the items in sight. Be prepared to wait patiently, occasionally calling out or whistling softly.

Get Help

    After 24 hours, it's time to let the community help. Call local vets, zoos, animal control and Humane Society branches for advice, and ask them to keep watch for your budgie. Make "lost bird" flyers with a picture, a description and your phone number; take them to local vets, the police station and stores to put in display areas. Put an ad in the local newspaper with a short description and your phone number. Don't give up. Continue to place ads and post new fliers until he's found. People tend to notice when an exotic bird's around; there's little they can do if you haven't gotten the word out -- not just once but over the course of time.

What Does the Gouldian Finch Eat?

The Gouldian Finch is a vividly colored bird that is native to Northern Australia and is classified as an endangered species due to raplidly declining population numbers. The Austraila Government's Department of Environment and Heritage estimates that only approximately 2500 adult Gouldian Finches exist in the wild. The adult bird is approximately 5.5 inches in length. Eating a variety of seeds and vegetables, Gouldian Finches require a variety of foods to keep them healthy.

Seeds

    Gouldian Finches prefer smaller seeds like millet and niger as staples to their diets. While seeds can make up most of a Gouldian Finch's diet, they cannot provide the complete nutrition required for maximum health.

Vegetables

    Fresh vegetables provide necessary Vitamin E for Gouldian Finches. Spinach leaves, sprouts, chickweed, watercress and lettuces should be offered frequently to ensure that the bird has adequate Vitamin E levels.

Calcium

    Calcium is especially important in egg-laying female Gouldian Finches. A cuttlebone, which is available at most pet stores, or crushed eggshells can be given to satisfy the bird's need for calcium.

Vitamin D

    Gouldian Finches that do not get exposed to sunlight must be given Vitamin D. A Vitamin D or multivitamin supplement for birds is available at pet stores.

Grit

    Grit is an important part of a Gouldian Finch's diet. Grit is similar to fiber in humans. For these birds, crushed oyster shells or crushed coal is a good source of dietary grit.

Clean Water

    Clean, fresh water is required for Gouldian Finches to thrive. The water should be changed at least once daily.

Kamis, 21 Juni 2012

Does a Parakeet Need a Nest to Lay an Egg?

Does a Parakeet Need a Nest to Lay an Egg?

The parakeet family includes numerous small and medium-size species of parrots, including budgerigars and ringnecked parakeets. They are ideal avian pets -- easy to care for and very sociable. Breeding any wild animal in captivity is tricky, but under the right conditions, you can have a successful breeding program with just one pair of birds.

Nests

    Like all birds, parakeets build nests. In captivity, the best idea is to build or buy a nesting box. This is a simple wooden box with a small entry hole where the parakeets and eggs are shielded from predators. A female parakeet will be disinclined to build a nest and lay eggs if the nesting materials are just placed in the bottom of the cage, because they will be exposed. Attach the nesting box to the cage or place it nearby, but don't introduce it until the pair have bonded and are performing mating rituals.

Mating Behavior

    Like other birds, parakeets have a mating ritual to attract other birds. This includes a lot of chirping, feeding each other and dancing on the perch. This dance includes showing off plumage and leads to the male mounting the female before they mate. Once you see this behavior, set up the nesting box.

Materials

    The best material to put in the nesting box is unscented wood shavings. This will allow the birds to build a suitable nest and give the female something on which to gnaw. Place the wood shavings in the bottom of the nesting box and let the birds build the nest for themselves.

Maturity and Season

    Parakeets' breeding season is commonly between October and March. They can lay up to three clutches of four to eight eggs; they should be stopped from having a third clutch, because the chicks will be weaker than in previous clutches. Breeding parakeets are over 1 year old and should be healthy and strong fliers to produce strong offspring. A parakeet's health is shown by its feathers; clean, bright feathers indicate a well-conditioned bird.

In the Wild

    Mating in the wild is not all that different from mating in captivity. The birds build nests most commonly in trees so they are out of the reach of land-based predators, and the breeding season and mating rituals remain the same. In the wild, parakeets breed in groups of several hundred or more. Having two or three mating pairs in captivity will increase the chances of successful breeding.

Hummingbird Nectar Ingredients

Hummingbird Nectar Ingredients

Hummingbirds are gorgeous, fascinating creatures. Supplying hummingbirds with a safe and simple nectar recipe will increase the likelihood that you will find these delicate beauties fluttering outside your windows. It is important not to add other ingredients to the recipe, as many items, including honey, brown sugar, gelatin, fruit, artificial sweeteners and food dyes, may be harmful to the birds. Food dyes are not necessary to attract hummingbirds to the feeder. If you would like to add some color, buy a brightly colored feeder or tie a colored cloth around the feeder.

Sugar

    Use white cane sugar. The mixture should be one part sugar to four parts water, which is typically the right amount for the average feeder.

Water

    Combine the sugar and water bring it to a slow boil for two minutes. Stir the mixture until the sugar has dissolved. The purpose of boiling the mixture is to eliminate chlorine from the water and to kill any mold or yeast that might be in the sugar, thus making the nectar longer-lasting and safer for the birds.

Storage

    Cover and cool the nectar before using or storing. Store any extra in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. Nectar should generally be replaced once a week. Feeders should be cleaned with a mild detergent or a vinegar and water mixture and then rinsed each time you replace the nectar.

How to Mate Cockatiel Birds

Cockatiels are very social birds originating from Australia. They often get attached to their keeper as well as other cockatiels, making them easy to handle and mate. A same-sex pair will get along just as good as a male-female pair. There are some personality differences between males and females. Females are quiet most of the time, while males love to talk and whistle. Females can also be more assertive and may hiss or bite. The males are more involved as parents than females. Cockatiels mate for life.

Instructions

    1

    Ensure that your birds are old enough to breed, the correct sex, and generally healthy and free from disease. 15 to 24 months is the most common age to breed cockatiels. A trip to the vet to have your bird sexed will reveal whether it's a male or female and determine how healthy it is.

    2

    Prepare the breeding habitats. Get a breeding cage big enough for a pair of birds. The recommended minimum size is 48"x18"x18". The cage has to be oversized due to the increased activity levels during mating.

    Buy a nest box as well. It should be big enough to hold two parents and about five babies. Approximately 12"x12"x18" high is a good size. Although much smaller than the normal cage, the birds won't move much once the eggs are laid, so the larger size isn't required.

    3

    Provide the correct conditions for mating. Twelve hours of sunlight is highly recommended. Make sure the birds have plenty of drinking and bathing water. Give them plenty of soft, fresh food. Foods rich in calcium and vitamins A and E such as carrots, broccoli, squash yams, cuttle bone, mineral blocks and oyster-shell grit keep them healthy during mating.

    4

    After the pair has mated a couple times, open the nesting box. Watch as the male checks out the home you have created and brings in his mate.

    5

    Wait 1 to 3 weeks and the female will start laying her eggs. She may lay around 4 to 6 eggs every other day or so. Tap the box to let the birds know you are there before you check the eggs. Sneaking up on the birds during this time often results in painful bites.

    6

    Hold the eggs up to a light around 7 to 10 days after being laid. You know the chick is growing when you see red or pink streaks on the inside of the egg.

    7

    Start feeding the parents soft food such as fruit, cooked rice or beans. The softer foods are easier to regurgitate to feed the chicks as they hatch. The eggs will begin to hatch in 19 to 21 days.

How to Find Earthworms

Look for worms in dark, cool, moist areas.

Instructions

    1

    Understand that earthworms live in damp, dark places.

    2

    Turn over rocks, fallen logs and other dead vegetation and look underneath for worms.

    3

    Check in damp areas, particularly areas next to ponds, lakes and streams where the earth is very moist. You won't find many worms in dry areas.

    4

    Strip back the bark on the soil side of fallen logs and look for worms inside the bark.

    5

    Scoop out an area of moist soil from a cool, dark place, like under a tree. Sort through the soil carefully by hand to locate worms.

    6

    Wait for rain. Worms come to the surface when it rains. They must remain in a damp environment. Rain allows them to access the surface and look for mates more easily than if they were underground.

    7

    Attract worms with a compost area made of leftover food, newspapers, and dead leaves and vegetation. Place the items in a dark, moist area that touches the earth, and water it to get it started. Soon worms will be there in force.

Rabu, 20 Juni 2012

How to Tell Male From Female Quaker Parrots

How to Tell Male From Female Quaker Parrots

Quaker parrots, also known as quaker parakeets or monk parakeets, are a small type of parrot native to South America. The only species of parrot to build nests, they are very hardy and have established populations in areas of North America and Europe. Because of their ability to thrive in the United States, and because they are thought to be crop pests (although this is disputed), several states ban or restrict the ownership of these birds. As pets they can be loud and mischievous, but are also smart, affectionate and good vocal mimics. Males and females are visually identical, so a trip to the vet is probably necessary to determine the sex of your bird.

Instructions

DNA Sexing by a Vet

    1

    Take your quaker to a qualified avian veterinarian. Aside from determining the sex, it is always a good idea to have a vet conduct regular checkups and screenings.

    2

    Ask the vet to determine the sex of the bird through DNA testing. This is done by taking a small blood sample from the bird's leg, which the vet will send to a lab to be tested. Additionally, the vet can have other tests run on the blood to determine if certain diseases are present, and to make sure that the bird is receiving proper nutrition.

    3

    Decide if you want to use the alternative method of plucking several feathers and sending them to a lab for testing. Although this can be done without a vet, this method allows for fewer health screenings than a blood draw and runs the risk of trauma to the bird and infection or irritation at the plucking sites.

Surgical Sexing

    4

    Take your bird to a qualified avian vet for this procedure.

    5

    Ask the vet to determine the sex of the bird through surgical sexing. Putting the bird under general anesthesia, the vet will shave an area of the parrot's abdomen, make an incision and insert an endoscope. Inspecting the parrot's reproductive organs, the vet will determine whether the bird is male or female.

    6

    Provide your bird with appropriate post-operative care; make sure the incision site is kept clean. Monitor the site for proper healing.

How to Make Outdoor Bird Food Ornaments

Attract wild birds to your yard by hanging bird-seed ornaments from your trees. because these treats use all-natural ingredients, you do not have to worry about waste. Birds and squirrels can consume the entire ornament. Choose a rainy day to make several of these, then hang them after the rain stops. After hanging, you can watch the birds flock to your yard as they visit these decorative feeders.

Instructions

Pinecone Ornaments

    1

    Place the suet cake into a glass bowl and microwave on high for 30 seconds to 1 minute, stirring after every 20 seconds.

    2

    Stir 1/2 cup natural peanut butter into the melted suet.

    3

    Mix 1/2 cup bird seed with the melted peanut butter and suet.

    4

    Tie a 6-inch length of string around the top 1 inch of each pinecone used. Tie a 3-inch loop at the end of the string.

    5

    Pour the remaining 1 cup of bird seed into a second glass bowl.

    6

    Dip each pine cone into the suet/peanut butter mixture.

    7

    Roll the dipped pine cone in the dry bird seed to completely cover it. Be careful not to bury the string in the bird seed.

    8

    Lay the ornaments onto a sheet of wax paper to cool and harden.

    9

    Hang several ornaments from low tree branches in your yard.

Bird-Seed Ornaments With Oranges

    10

    Cut an orange in half.

    11

    Scoop out the fruit from both halves with a grapefruit spoon or spoon. Leave the orange peel intact.

    12

    Make two small holes across from each other by poking through the peel with the knife 1/2 inch from the cut portion of the orange half. Repeat on the other orange half.

    13

    Tie each end of the string or ribbon into the holes to create a handle to hang your orange ornament from a tree. Repeat with the other orange half and other string.

    14

    Fill the two orange halves with bird seed to the rim and hang from a tree.

How to Feed a Baby Mourning Dove

How to Feed a Baby Mourning Dove

Sometimes a baby mourning dove may fall from the nest or be abandoned by its parents. If you find a baby dove that is unable to fly, you can hand-feed it until it is able to survive on its own. It's critical to feed baby birds the correct food. Doves are ground feeders and eat seed. A mother dove digests the seeds before feeding them to her young. Since parrots are seed eaters, baby parrot food formula available at pet stores will provide the appropriate nutrition for baby doves until they are able to eat seed on their own.

Instructions

    1

    Mix baby parrot food formula according to package instructions. Warm the food to approximately 105 degrees Fahrenheit. Baby doves will refuse food if it's not warm.

    2

    Use a syringe to feed the baby dove. Gently touch the side of the dove's beak with the tip of the syringe, which will stimulate it to open its mouth. Watch the bird's crop, which is a small sack under its beak. When the crop is full, stop feeding.

    3

    Feed the baby dove every two to three hours a day. If the bird's crop is empty, it needs to be fed again. Do not give baby doves water. Sufficient water is contained in the baby bird food formula. Force-feeding water to a baby bird may drown it.

    4

    Introduce finch birdseed to the diet. When the baby bird is ready for a solid diet, it will begin to lose interest and refuse the baby bird formula. At first you may need to help the baby eat solid seed. Gently open its beak with the tip of your fingernail and drop in a few seeds at a time. Release the bird's head so it can swallow the seeds.

    Continue feeding seeds until its crop is full.

    5

    Encourage the bird to peck seeds. After a few hand-feedings of solid seed, it should be willing to eat seed on its own. Sprinkle seed on the floor of its cage for it to eat. Check it's crop to be sure it is swallowing the seed. Continue hand-feeding until it can eat and fill its crop on its own.

    6

    Release the baby bird. Once the baby bird is able to peck seed and eat on its own without losing weight, it is ready to be released. Be sure the baby dove is a strong flier before releasing it into the wild.

How to Make a Pileated Woodpecker Feeder

How to Make a Pileated Woodpecker Feeder

The pileated woodpecker, or Dryocopus pileatus, measures over 15 inches and is a striking sight. It is the largest woodpecker in North America. The bird's giant red crest and sleek body make it quite the backyard find. Once very rare due to habitat destruction, the species is making a comeback. While still a rare find at a bird feeder, these woodpeckers mate for life and are sometimes spotted at feeders together.

Instructions

    1

    Cut off the finished ends of three sides of each piece of mesh with the metal cutting shears. This leaves a series of loose wire ends.

    2

    Using pliers, twist the loose wire ends on the right side of one piece of mesh to the loose ends on the left side of the other. This creates one large sheet of mesh connected in the middle. The finished end should be at the top.

    3

    Fold the large sheet in half. Connect the remaining loose ends.

    4

    Twist the loose ends at the bottom together. All of the loose ends of wire are now twisted together.

    5

    Using your hands, shape the wire frame into a basket.

    6

    Place the suet, available at most pet stores or supermarkets, into the wire basket.

    7

    Using wire or string, hang the suet feeder from a tree or other structure. Since pileated woodpeckers are shy birds, place it in a secluded spot away from other bird feeders.

What Is the Least Expensive & Best Bird for a Pet?

What Is the Least Expensive & Best Bird for a Pet?

Birds are popular pets in the United States and around the world. Many birds, especially the larger parrots and rare birds, can be very expensive to buy. Then you need to factor in the cost of housing and caring for your pet, including a cage, food, toys and veterinary care. In many cases, the smaller the bird, the smaller the costs involved. Here are three relatively inexpensive birds that might be the best pet bird for you.

Parakeets

    Parakeets are intelligent and easily trained.
    Parakeets are intelligent and easily trained.

    One of the most popular pet birds is the parakeet. The common blue and green parakeets generally cost $15 to $20. Fancier varieties can be more. Most parakeets are friendly, intelligent and easy to train, so they make good beginner birds. Although they are only about 7 inches tall, experts suggest buying the largest cage you can afford and for which you have space. (The minimum recommended cage size would be 14 inches wide x 16 inches long x 16 inches high.) Parakeets eat pellet or seed-based diets, but but offer bright colored fruits and vegetables as supplements.They enjoy toys, a variety of perches, the opportunity to fly free in the house and interaction with their humans. Parakeets can live on average 15-25 years with good care.

Finches

    Finches don't enjoy being handled, but like to watch their people.
    Finches don't enjoy being handled, but like to watch their people.

    Another inexpensive pet bird would be a finch. There are many varieties (some can cost $100 or more), but the common kinds, like the zebra finch and the society finch, will average from $15 to $25. Finches are easy to care for and don't require much room. These birds get all their exercise by flying (they don't climb around in the cage like parakeets) so they need a cage that allows them enough space. Think longer rather than higher because they fly horizontally. Finches enjoy being able to see people, but don't enjoy being handled. They are social, so you keep them in pairs. They don't talk or learn tricks, so these birds are better for people who just want to have a bird to watch and hear. Feed them pellet or seed-based food, along with fresh fruits and veggies, as well as a protein source like mealworms or hardboiled egg occasionally. Well-cared for finches will live an average of 5 years.

Doves

    Doves make good pets for beginners, including children.
    Doves make good pets for beginners, including children.

    Another inexpensive choice would be a dove. The most common types as pets include the ringneck, diamond, and white. Doves usually cost $25 to $40. They are gentle and "soft spoken," and they enjoy being handled by their owners, so they also make good birds for beginners. Doves eat finch pellets or seed-based diets along with fresh fruits and veggies. They swallow their seeds whole, so you need to feed them some grit to help with digestion. Again, the bigger the cage you can afford, the better. (Minimum size would be 18 inches wide x 22 inches long x 18 inches high. Doves enjoy time to fly free inside the house for exercise.The average lifespan for a pet dove would be about 20-25 years.

Getting the Most for Your Money

    Cages can often be purchased online for less than at pet stores.
    Cages can often be purchased online for less than at pet stores.

    Where you buy your bird and supplies determines what you pay, so do your homework. Many people buy from pet stores, but you can often find better birds through breeders, sometimes for less money than the stores. Or consider adopting your bird from a rescue group. Check online for supplies like cages, perches and toys. Get sure you're familiar with your bird's care requirements.

How to Locate an African Grey in North Carolina

How to Locate an African Grey in North Carolina

The African Grey Parrot is considered one of the most intelligent animal species due to ability to comprehend and understand human language and mimic the calls of various other animals. The Grey is one of the most popular type of exotic animals-turned-domesticated pets. It originates from Central and Western Africa, where their diet consist of fruits, nuts and vegetation. If you live in North Carolina and are in search of a pet African Grey, there several places you can look to find this intelligent bird.

Instructions

    1

    Visit the BirdBreeders website.

    2

    Select "NC North Carolina" in the right column.

    3

    Select the breed of bird in the "That Breed" drop-down menu. For example, select "Congo African Grey" or "Timneh African Grey." Click "Go."

    4

    Call each bird breeder or pet shop from your search list and see if they have your preferred African Grey breed available for sale.

Growing Birdseed on Cotton Wool

Growing Birdseed on Cotton Wool

Fill Your Yard with Feathered Gems

    Who can resist a yard full of jewel-toned songbirds? Drawing birds to your backyard is simple. Provide cover from predators, a source of clean water, room to nest and roost and a variety of foods and they will arrive in a flurry of feathers. Seed costs have risen dramatically in recent months. Shortages of popular varieties of bird seed are driving some bird enthusiasts to grow and sprout their own seed. Sprouting materials vary, but one standby, cotton wool, is effective and easy to obtain. Cotton wool batting is sold in most craft stores. Spread a layer of cotton wool batting on a potting table, layer it with seed, and wait.

Fend off Freezing

    Birds keep warm in winter by shivering. This requires energy, in the form of high-fat, high-calorie foods. The hulls of seed sprouted in cotton wool are easier to remove, saving precious calories for keeping warm. Nijer, black or striped sunflower, millet and flax are all easy to germinate.

Ring the Dinner Bell

    Lay cotton wool batting on your indoor potting table and spread some of the seed your birds prefer onto it. Keep the potting shed temperature well above freezing. Moisten the cotton wool daily until the hulls of the seeds loosen, which takes 24 to 36 hours at most. Use the germinated seed before green sprouts appear, or it may get moldy.

    Place just enough of each type of sprouted seed in your feeder for the birds to eat in one day. Large piles of uneaten food draw pests. Plant any remaining germinated seed in your garden or at the edge of the yard, near a brush pile or hedge row. Hang several bird houses nearby to provide night-time roosts.