Kamis, 31 Mei 2012

What Can Finch Birds Eat?

What Can Finch Birds Eat?

Finches are song birds living primarily in the Northern Hemisphere, although some subspecies live below the Equator. Finches are classified as passerine, or perching, birds of the Fringillidae family and were a central part of Darwin's theory of evolution. Darwin noticed how the shapes of finch beaks on the Galapagos Islands changed to adapt to food sources. Finches eat a range of food, but have evolved to consume whatever food source is naturally available.

Seeds

    Seeds make up the vast amount of a finch's diet. In the wild these seeds are either taken from the ground or directly from the plants. In captivity bird seed can be purchased at any pet store. In captivity millet seeds are a good food source, but need to be supplemented with other foods. During the winter more oily seeds will be required to help the bird gain body fat. Sprouting seeds are also a great food source as the seed provides the base nutrition and the sprout extra vitamins.

Berries and Fruit

    Seeds are not a food source on their own, as they do not contain enough vitamins to sustain a finch. In the wild, as with the seeds, finches will eat berries off plants and trees and have evolved to be able to take advantage of food sources. In captivity it is more of a case of finding out what a particular finch likes. Apples, oranges and bananas are a good place to start, but it is a case of trial and error.

Vegetables and Plants

    Anther good source of vitamins for finches is vegetables and plant leaves. Cucumbers, broccoli and grass are all popular foods for finches. It is important to make sure the vegetables are organic, as pesticides could be harmful. Sprouting plants are especially good for finches, as the young shoots are particularly nutritious. Young and spouting grasses, chickweeds and thistles can all be used. Sprouting plants give finches seeds as well.

Bugs

    There is a lack of protein in a vegetable-only diet, and like other birds finches will also eat small bugs found on the ground. Maggots and mealworms can be bought from any good pet food store and can be fed periodically to the birds. It is important not to feed them insects from the back garden, as they may be carrying parasites, whereas shop-sold live foods are treated for potential disease.

Do Bananas Harm Birds?

Do Bananas Harm Birds?

In the wild, bananas provide one of the most common staples of an exotic bird's diet. Birds such as parrots and macaws use the bananas and the banana trees for shelter, nourishment, protection and roosting. Despite the best efforts of bird enthusiasts, bananas still have come under suspicion of being unhealthy, and even lethal, for birds to eat.

Folklore

    Despite popular belief, bananas cannot harm birds. The reason this legend exists is because some birds simply don't like to eat bananas, much the same way some people don't enjoy the fruit. It is much more common for an exotic species of bird to enjoy bananas than a bird found exclusively in colder climates, such as a sparrow or robin.

Benefits

    Bananas provide several vitamins and essential nutrients that birds require to stay healthy and fit. Some vitamins found in bananas include A, B6 and C. Potassium is also extremely beneficial for birds as it regulates their protein levels.

Dangers

    The only danger bananas can cause to birds is if they have been treated with a chemical agent. Banana farmers and home owners with banana plants commonly spray their plants so bugs don't invade and ruin the fruit. These chemicals are odorless, not easily detectable by the bird, and can cause serious internal harm and even death.

Solution

    Wash every banana you purchase for your home. Whether it is for your pets or human consumption, by cleaning the fruit we are eliminating the chances of illness caused by pesticide.

Rabu, 30 Mei 2012

Foods Canaries Eat

Foods Canaries Eat

Feed a canary the right foods in the right amounts, and it will sing and thrive. According to veterinarian and author Julia Adams, canaries in the wild eat a variety of seeds, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins and minerals. It's important that a pet canary receive the same diverse but balanced diet.

Seed Mix

    When it comes to seeds, a canary's primary food source, quality is key. A good mix usually includes rape, flax, linseed, hemp, maw, thistle, millet and especially seed from the canary grass plant. Many mixes also come enriched with vitamins A, B, C, and D. Most birds eat about a teaspoon of seed a day. Canaries usually won't overeat, but they might eat more in cooler weather.

Pellets

    An alternative to seed mix is a pellet diet, which is similar to dog or cat food. Pellets are usually so high in vitamins and minerals that they reduce the need for supplemental foods and minerals. It's important to note, however, that if a canary has been eating a seed-based diet, it may not switch to pellets easily, because it may not recognize the pellets as food.

Fruit and Vegetables

    Canaries enjoy many fruits and vegetables as snacks. As with the rest of their diet, canaries respond to variety, so try giving your bird small amounts of different fruits and vegetables throughout the week. With vegetables, greener is better: kale, broccoli, spinach, peas and watercress are excellent choices. With fruit, apples, oranges, grapes, bananas and melon are appropriate in small amounts.

Protein

    In the wild, canaries get their protein from insects. As pets, they need some protein once a week, and the easiest option is eggs. will eat the whole egg, shell and all: mash up a hard-boiled egg, and crush the shell on a separate plate.

Minerals

    Keeping a cuttlebone (the internal shell of a cuttlefish) or a mineral block in the cage is crucial to the canary's health. The calcium ensures the canary has a strong beak and that any eggs produced have hardy shells. The minerals also aid in the bird's digestion.

How to Breed Feather Dusters

How to Breed Feather Dusters

The name "feather duster" was given to budgies that suffer from a genetic mutation which makes their feathers grow constantly. Because these birds' feathers grow at such an accelerated pace, the feathers take precedence over the body when acquiring nutrients, often leaving the budgie malnourished and emaciated. These birds were first seen in 1966 and are thought to be a result of English budgie interbreeding. Even today, however, though budgies' familial pasts are investigated before breeding begins, feather dusters continue to be bred.

Instructions

    1

    Breed two budgies with English show budgie parentage to increase your chances of acquiring a feather duster budgie. However, doing this intentionally is highly ill-advised. Feather dusters experience a lower quality of life as compared with fellow budgies, as they are ignored by their mothers due to their different appearance. However, if one is bred accidentally, it is best to take care of it as gently as possible.

    2

    Pay close attention to the subsequent brood of budgies after breeding occurs. Feather dusters will, at first, appear to be the most impressive of the chicks because they are much larger than the rest. Their chirps are also much louder. However, after about three weeks, their feathers will appear long and curly when their brothers and sisters have straight feathers.

    3

    Trim the feather duster's feathers, particularly around the head. The feathers will soon grow to obstruct its vision, so it is important to keep the feathers around the eyes pared back. This should be done once a week. Part of the feather duster syndrome is a pair of short, flightless wings, so it is not as vital that the wing feathers be pruned.

    4

    Feed your budgie a diet rich in amino acids, methionine and lysine to keep it healthy. These nutrients are needed for feather growth, and their presence in a feather duster's body prevents the feather growth from depleting additional nutrients. Though these budgies spend much of their time eating in order to have enough nutrients to survive at all, breeders have found that incorporating nutrients that encourage feather growth helped feather dusters live longer, more normal lives.

How to Tell If a Parakeet Is Male or Female?

Parakeets make great, friendly pets. If you have one, you might be curious as to whether it's male or female for naming purposes. And if you want to breed parakeets, you will definitely need to be able to tell if a parakeet is male or female. However, young parakeets do not have visible genitals, so you'll need to use other methods to determine your bird's gender.

Instructions

    1

    Look above your parakeet's beak, where you will see a set of nostrils. There is a strip of flesh there that is different from the beak and anything else on the bird. This is the cere (pronounced seeree). This is where the gender of the parakeet can be determined.

    2

    Look closely at the color of the cere. A parakeet with a blue or purple cere is a male bird, while a parakeet with a pink or brown cere is a female bird. Sometimes it can be difficult to determine the color of the cere because some females have a little bit of blue and white around their nostrils. But males have all blue or purple ceres; if it is any other color, it is a female.

    3

    Determine the gender of a parakeet when it is younger than 1 year old, because the bird has not fully developed yet at this point. This means the cere is usually different. In young males the cere is a bright, purplish pink, while in young females the cere is usually white.

    4

    Some parakeet behaviors can help you tell if the bird is male or female. Males bob their heads more, sing more and interact with humans more. Females are more territorial and bossy, and they chirp loudly more than they sing.

    5

    If you want to be absolutely sure of your parakeet's gender, you need to make an appointment with an avian vet (a veterinarian who specializes in birds). The avian vet will use a few feathers or a toenail to get a small amount of blood to test the bird's DNA. When the results come in you will know without a doubt if your parakeet is male or female.

How to Take a Parakeet Home

How to Take a Parakeet Home

A new addition to a family often takes preparation before arrival. The same goes for pets. When you take your parakeet home from a breeder or pet store, it is important to not only ensure it is safe and comfortable during transit, but that it has adequate shelter and other essentials once it is in your home. While you and your family may be excited about your parakeet's arrival and might want to watch it quietly for extended periods of time, naturalist Lisa Shea states that birds get very paranoid when it's completely silent. Continue living your life as usual in your home and your parakeet will acclimate properly.

Instructions

    1

    Purchase a large, permanent cage to house your parakeet once it arrives at your home. If you have other animals, especially cats, hang your cage high from the ground or place it out-of-reach on a dresser or table away from possible danger. Line the base of the cage with newspaper.

    2

    Purchase a small cage to transport your parakeet. Punch numerous small air holes into a cardboard box for a less-expensive alternative to a cage. Place your parakeet into the box and do not open it during transport as the bird may fly away.

    3

    Drape a towel over your cage if your parakeet is showing signs of distress such as hyperactive wing flapping or hurling its body against the insides of the cage. A towel over your parakeet's cage will most likely produce a calming effect.

    4

    Drive home taking the shortest route possible. If you are taking public transportation such as a bus or train, plan ahead so that you spend the least amount of time in transport. Like other types of animals, parakeets can become stressed when confined to a small cage or box in a foreign environment.

    5

    Close all windows and doors once you and the caged parakeet are inside your home. Make paper signs that read "Do Not Open Doors." Tape them to the outside of all of your doors as a warning for visitors.

    6

    Open your small cage or box. Your parakeet may fly out. If this is the case, allow it to fly around your home until it calms down. Once it is calm, wrap a towel around its wings and torso. If your parakeet doesn't fly out of the box, gently encircle your hands around its wings and torso and remove it.

    7

    Place your parakeet into its permanent cage. Provide it with fresh water and bird seed.

Selasa, 29 Mei 2012

How to Build a Budgie Flight Cage

How to Build a Budgie Flight Cage

Flight cages are large cages that allow the inhabitants of the cages to have room to move about and stretch their wings. The construction of flight cages is generally lightweight wire mesh, so you can suspend them from the ceiling or contain them on another structure that lifts the cage from the ground. Budgies need flight cages that are longer than they are wide and tall, so that the birds can fly from perch to perch. A flight cage should be at least 20 inches wide to allow your budgie to fully spread its wings. The rest of the cage width and length depends on you and your plans for storing and placing the cage in your home or aviary.

Instructions

    1

    Calculate the size of the cage you wish to construct for your bird. Lay out your wire and cut six pieces of mesh. These pieces will serve as the top, bottom and sides of your flight cage. Be sure and measure out the pieces of mesh to ensure your cage sides, top and bottom will be of equal size.

    2

    Flatten the cut pieces by bending the wire slightly with your hands. Manipulate the wire until the pieces are flat and straight.

    3

    Join the wire together, using the "J" clips. Place a clip every 3 inches and then use your pliers to secure the "J" clip into place. Don't be afraid to use too many clips--the more used when joining, the tighter the cage will be and the shape of the cage will also hold better.

    4

    Determine where you would like to place the main door of the cage. Cut out a door that is at least 5 inches tall by 3 1/2 inches wide. Use your "J" clamps to attach the door to the cage. Be sure to not attach the clamps too tightly as you want the door to swing freely upon opening. Use a small wire spring to affix the door closed.

    5

    Check the edges of the cage for any sharp points. File down any potentially dangerous edges or points with your file.

    6

    Wash the cage thoroughly upon completion of its construction. Allow to air-dry, and then equip the cage with appropriate accessories such as food cups, perches and toys. Place the cage on the stand or hang from the ceiling to keep the cage from residing on the floor.

How to Transition a Parakeet to a Healthy Diet

One of the challenges of getting a new parakeet is putting the bird on a healthy diet. A healthy diet includes pellet, fruits, vegetables and seed; all-seed diets can cut down on the birds life expectancy. Parakeets may eat seeds in the wild, but there they get a lot more exercise than does the average pet bird. Pet birds are often quite similar to toddlers with wings. Some birds are easy to transition, while others are a little more difficult. Some parakeets have been known to throw food out of their dishes if they find it unpleasing.

Instructions

    1

    Find out what the bird will eat. If you buy him from a breeder or store, ask what they feed their parakeets. If the bird is a rescue, this issue is more complicated. You may have to try a few different types of food before you win.

    2

    Try making the bird go cold turkey. Substitute pellet for seed and see what happens. Some parakeets will eat just about anything you put in their food dish. Others will resist at first, but eventually get hungry enough to eat it. Others will not be impressed at all. These birds will refuse to eat and throw the food out of the cage--possibly at you. If this is the case, you have more work to do.

    3

    For the next week, continue to feed the bird straight seed. Then start mixing in a very small amount of pellet. After a week or so, increase the amount of pellet. If the bird again reacts poorly, cut back a little and slow down the transition. Each bird is different. Use good judgment. Be forceful when you need to be, but also know if the bird isnt eating enough. Losing even 5g in weight is bad for such a small bird.

    4

    Once the pellet conversion is underway, start introducing the bird to fresh fruits and vegetables, as well as pasta and breads. You may want to do this in a separate food dish. You can hang leafy greens in the cage and see if they perk up the parakeets interest. Learn you birds likes and dislikes. Just like a human, your parakeet has his own opinions on food.

    5

    Know that seed isnt all bad. You do not want to eliminate seed from the parakeets diet. Use millet sprays as a treat and for training. Have a special treat bowl just for seed, millet and other treats for outside the cage. At first, start with only millet. Once you have the bird totally transitioned to pellet, start reintroducing seed as a snack.

How to Sex Society Finches

How to Sex Society Finches

Society finches are very active birds, and will keep their owners entertained with their antics. They are typically brown and white, but can be any combination of black, beige and gray. Unlike birds that are in the wild, both the male and female of this species are the same colors, making it hard to tell the males from the females by sight alone. These finches must be watched for personality characteristics in order to tell which sex they are.

Instructions

Telling Male From Female

    1

    Pay close attention to the sounds your finches make. Both sexes make chirping noises, but only the males will sing.

    2

    Check the vent on the underside of the bird during breeding season. Male finches will have a slight protrusion in this area, and females will not.

    3

    Keep an eye on your finches during breeding season. Females will lay eggs whether or not there are males in the cage.

Senin, 28 Mei 2012

How to Make Edible Bird Seed Ornaments

Feeding the wild birds in your area is a fun and rewarding thing to do. Birds appreciate your efforts, especially in the winter when food is hard to find. If you want to help them out in the winter, you can make durable ornaments for them to feast upon. Below are instructions on how to make lasting edible bird seed ornaments.

Instructions

    1

    Mix together 1 cup peanut butter, 1 cup shortening and 3 cups cornmeal until it forms a paste. If you are working with children who have a peanut allergy or if you have a peanut allergy, you can use vegetable shortening instead of peanut butter.

    2

    Take a cookie cutter and press it into a slice of bread.

    3

    Let the bread dry overnight.

    4

    Smear the mixture all over the hardened bread.

    5

    Decorate with seeds.

    6

    Use raffia to hang the ornament from the tree. Raffia is a string made of leaves of a raffia palm tree, so it is all natural and will not harm birds and animals or the environment. Be sure to hang the ornament where you can see it so you can watch the birds eat. However, make sure it is an area where birds will feel protected--near or in branches of a tree or bush.

Difference Between Food Grade & Regular Bird Food

Difference Between Food Grade & Regular Bird Food

Whether you're feeding a pet or the wild birds that live in your yard, choosing which bird food to use can be a confusing process. Some bird foods claim to be "food grade" or "human grade," while others don't. If you want to provide the best food for the best price, it's important to know the differences.

Definition

    "Food grade" is a term that means something is safe for consumption by humans. The FDA uses this term to categorize food additives and synthetic materials used in food preparation.

Other Terms

    Bird food can also be categorized as "feed grade," which means it's safe for consumption by animals but hasn't been approved for consumption by humans. Another common term on bird food labels is "human grade," which is a loose term the FDA uses for food that has been processed according to sanitation standards for food sold to humans.

Main Difference

    The main thing that separates food grade or human grade bird food from regular bird food is the process of producing it. To make something safe for human consumption, the production facilities must follow more rigorous sanitation standards.

Significance

    If you purchase food-quality bird food, you know you're getting food from facilities that have been inspected and regulated by the government.

Controversy

    The terms "food grade" and "human grade" refer only to sanitation standards. Items may be edible but still undesirable, such as animal byproducts.

Cost

    Food grade is typically more expensive because it's more difficult to produce. For example, you can buy regular bird food for $3 or $4 per pound, whereas 1 lb. of food-grade bird food from Goldenfeast would cost you $7 to $10.

How to Soak Seeds for Finches

How to Soak Seeds for Finches

When raising or offering food to finches, soaked seeds provide many nutrients beneficial to birds. The seed soaking process requires at least 24 hours.

Instructions

    1

    Purchase a finch seed mix or make your own consisting of 10 percent niger seed; 10 hemp seed; 20 percent red rape seed; 20 percent black rape seed; and 40 percent millet.

    2

    Place 5 heaping tablespoons of the finch seed mix into a wide-mouthed glass jar. Place a large square of muslin cloth over the jar and secure the sides with a rubber band wound around the mouth of the jar.

    3

    Hold the jar underneath a water faucet and fill the jar 3/4 of the way full. Move the jar in a tight circular motion to create a swirling action in the water and agitate the seeds. This will help remove dust that can cause bacterial and fungal growth. Drain the water.

    4

    Repeat Step 3 approximately 2 to 3 more times. The last time you drain the jar, refill it 3/4 of the way with room temperature water, approximately 68 to 77 degrees Fahrenheit. Soak the seeds for 12 hours.

    5

    Take off the muslin cover, pour the seeds in a sieve or colander and drain. Place the sieve inside a larger bowl and allow to sit for 12 hours. Rinse the seeds every 3 to 4 hours. By the end of the 12 hours, the seeds should be sprouting. Place the drained seeds back in the glass jar, with the muslin cover, to allow air circulation, and place in the refrigerator. Use the seeds within 5 to 7 days.

How to Care for Homing Pigeons

It takes a lot of effort to properly care for homing pigeons. Because the pigeons live in such close quarters, the spread of disease is always a present danger since it could wipe out all of your homing pigeons. Providing proper care for homing pigeons requires knowledge and prevention to keep them healthy and strong.

Instructions

    1

    Give your homing pigeons a daily dose of revital tablets to keep them strong and healthy. This is especially important if you plan to race your homing pigeon.

    2

    Provide additional daily vitamins for your homing pigeons including calcium and a vitamin A formula called Vimeral to keep them strong and healthy. Some contagious disease laws require that you give vitamins like these in the pigeon's drinking water.

    3

    Mix a vitamin solution into the pigeon's drinking water and give it to your pigeons for the next three days prior to a race. This solution will prevent the spread of disease among birds.

    4

    Soak the bird's grains in water before feeding them for one week following a big race. After a race, your pigeon may be very tired and have a weak digestive system.

    5

    Wash the pigeon's feet when it gets its strength back after a race. Use a warm water solution containing Dettol and remember to wash the feathers too in order to remove any germs the bird may have contracted during the race.

    6

    Care for your homing pigeons by giving them regular doses of antibiotics to help boost their immune systems to keep them healthy and strong.

Calcium Foods for African Grey Parrots

Calcium Foods for African Grey Parrots

African Greys are demanding pets, both mentally (because of their intelligence and tendency toward boredom) and physically. Without a proper diet, these sensitive birds can quickly become unhealthy and die. Calcium deficiency is one of the most common diet-related issues these birds experience, so a good African Grey diet will contain plenty of calcium-rich foods.

Dark Leafy Greens

    You may have heard that humans should try to eat plenty of dark leafy greens. The same is true for African Greys. Since some of these birds are picky eaters, try offering various kinds of leafy greens to determine which kind your parrot prefers. As with humans, some birds will prefer their greens raw while others enjoy having them steamed. Some options to offer your Grey include arugula, broccoli (the crowns and stems as well as the leaves), collard greens, kale and spinach.

Calcium-Rich Fruits

    Calcium is more common in vegetables, but some fruits can offer high amounts as well, and many particularly picky birds prefer fruits to vegetables. Dried or dehydrated apricots contain high levels of calcium, as do prunes, seedless raisins and canned figs. Be careful and double-check before feeding anything youre unsure of to your bird; rhubarb, for example, also has high levels of calcium, but is extremely toxic to parrots.

Egg Shells

    For a quick, intense burst of calcium, sprinkle some finely crushed egg shells onto your African Greys normal food. If your bird seems to be eating around the egg shells rather than consuming them, try mixing them into a soft food like applesauce, cooked rice or even scrambled eggs.

Nuts

    Certain nuts contain plenty of calcium. If your African Grey avoids the other foods listed, consider incorporating almonds, walnuts, sesame seeds, pine nuts and hazelnuts into his diet. Be sure to keep nuts and seeds as only a small part of the diet; many African Greys enjoy these items and would gladly binge on them rather than consuming their pellets or normal diet. This tendency can lead to other health issues if the bird is offered so many nuts that he does not need to eat any of his normal food.

Calcium Supplements

    If all else fails and a vet check has determined that your African Greys calcium levels are still too low, discuss the possibility of adding calcium supplements to your African Greys diet with your vet. These supplements should never be fed without a vets recommendation and should generally be used as a last resort. As with many things, prevention is key; feed your Grey a calcium-rich, varied diet and you will probably never need to use a supplement.

Minggu, 27 Mei 2012

How to Raise an Umbrella Cockatoo

The Umbrella Cockatoo is one of the most popular parrot species because it is a social creature, likes to cuddle, and is intelligent and curious. Often called the White-Crested or White Cockatoo, it is known for its white coloring with pale yellow underneath the tail and wing areas. Its white crest is flat on the top of the head, but unfolds when raised -- thus the name umbrella. These birds can live as long as 70 years, so if you want to raise one for a pet it requires a long-term commitment, among other things.

Instructions

    1

    Purchase a large cage for the Umbrella Cockatoo. This type of bird is curious and has a strong beak that can destroy many household items if he gets loose from his cage. Your bird will quickly become adept at unlocking his cages and escaping into the living area of your home. He should have plenty of room, perches and activities in his cage to avoid boredom. Toys will also satisfy his need to chew on something.

    2

    Place the cage in an area of your home where he can see the family and people can walk by and interact with him. The Umbrella Cockatoo craves the interaction and will provide hours of fun with his chatter and acrobatics.

    3

    Remove your cockatoo from his cage at least once every day. This will provide him with much needed exercise and a change of environment. This action will prevent boredom that can lead to feather plucking.

    4

    Feed your parrot twice a day, once in the morning and again in the evening. Give him a diet of bird pellets, along with raw fruits and vegetables, seeds, nuts, and cooked beans, grains and legumes. You may decide to leave a dish of pellets available at all times and feed him the other foods twice daily for variety and if you have a meeting late in the evening during his normal mealtime. Do not forget to keep his water bottle filled with water at all times.

    5

    Teach your parrot to talk once he is acclimated to his new home. Either give him one-on-one attention in his cage or while holding him. Say the new word repeatedly and slowly and soon he will start to mimic you. Exposing him to language takes time and patience. Do not attempt this when you or the bird is stressed.

Sabtu, 26 Mei 2012

How to Make Parrot Food

You can provide a healthy diet for your parrot by creating your own parrot food. It is easy and fun. You can add little things to make the food more enjoyable for your parrot, too.

Instructions

Parrot Food Recipe: Veggie Muffins

    1

    Mix these simple ingredients and bake at 350 F for 1/2 hour. Cool and serve.1 package corn muffin mix2 eggs (crush the shells and include them)1 can mixed vegetables (drained) or use 1 cup fresh vegetables1/4 cup nuts (Some parrots prefer one nut over another. Use your bird's favorite.)1/2 cup apple juice

    2

    Prepare the parrot food muffins and keep them refrigerated until you use them. These muffins can be frozen.

    3

    Substitute grains for the nuts in the parrot food. You can use fresh or dried fruits instead of vegetables.

    4

    Bake only one batch of this parrot food at a time. This allows you to add more variety as you determine which foods your parrot will eat.

    5

    Add other foods to your parrot's diet for a healthy variety. A treat cup of apples dipped in peanut butter and rolled in millet will keep your parrot delighted for hours.

How to Road Trip with Pet Birds

Dog and cat owners may envy bird owners in regards to the road trip. Their pets already have cages and birds do not need pit stops, but they do not know the other things bird owners have to plan for. You can road trip with birds, but you need to be prepared.

Instructions

    1

    Make sure your cage or carrier fits in the car. Some birds have huge cages. In those cases, you will need to make sure you have a carrier or a smaller cage for the trip. Make sure you can easily get the cage in and out of the car and that it fits in the seat. You do not want to tilt or angle the cage to make it fit.

    2

    Buckle the cage into the seat using the seat belt. Some cages will fit into the front passenger seat and the shoulder harness works. Other cages are too big for this. If you have the special child seat buckles, those might help secure the cage. Keep your birds safe. Remember anything not belted down will fly in an accident. Seat belts might just save their lives too.

    3

    Do shorter trial trips. If your birds have not traveled before, do smaller trial trips to see their reactions. Some birds love road trips. Other birds are completely stressed out by the car. Know how your bird will react, and be prepared to deal with it. If your bird does not react well, you may want to take a blanket or a cage cover to cover the carrier. You do not want to overly stress the bird.

    4

    Do not leave them in the car. This might seem like a no brainer, but just like with any pet, do not leave them in the car. That means if you stop to eat get it to go or fast food, do not sit down for a three course meal. Be aware of other people. Travelers see dogs and cats all the time. Birds in the car are a novelty. People may come up to your car and look in the windows or try to open the doors. This could really stress your bird out.

    5

    Be prepared. Make sure you have everything you will need for the trip. Keep the bird food, treats, first aid items and bottled water on hand. Make sure the emergency items are easily accessible. You never know when the water bottle will spill or someone will injure themselves. It is best to be ready for the worse case scenario.

Care & Feeding of Cockatoos

Care & Feeding of Cockatoos

Cockatoos are known for being affectionate, smart and loyal parrots. These birds are also known for the being the loudest of all parrots and perhaps the most the demanding of their caretakers. Cockatoos scream to communicate and need lots of attention and playtime. With proper care, cockatoos can live 40 years or more. To help ensure a long and healthy life, cockatoos need a varied diet, fresh water and a clean and safe living space.

Instructions

    1

    Purchase a cage that is not only safe but gives the cockatoo plenty of room. According to the website Busy Bird, cockatoos range in size from 12 to 27 inches in length. Select a cage that gives the cockatoo room to fly around and can hold multiple perches as well as toys and dishes for food and water. To keep the bird safe, the cage should have metal bars that are no more than 1 inch apart. A metal grate should also cover the drip tray to prevent the bird from eating its own droppings.

    2

    Select a few perches for the cage. Cockatoos should have multiple perches in their cage to help them exercise their feet and prevent arthritis. Choose natural, untreated perches that are at least 9 inches long by 1 inch in diameter.

    3

    Place the cage in an area that is well lit and off the floor. Cockatoos are flock animals and like being around people. Put the cage in a busy area of the house where they can watch the activity. Be mindful of the temperature around the cage. Cockatoos can quickly overheat and need to be able to move to a part of the cage where they can cool down.

    4

    Feed the cockatoo specialized pellets for the majority of their diet. Seeds can also be used in moderation as well as fresh fruits and vegetables. Nearly any fruit or vegetable is safe, but avoid giving the bird fruit seeds and avocados. Throw away any fruits or vegetables that are not eaten within a day. Provide fresh, clean water on a daily basis.

    5

    Clean the cage on a weekly basis. Discard and replace the paper lining and wipe down the inside and outside of the cage as well as the toys, food and water dishes.

    6

    Bathe the cockatoo using lukewarm water or lightly mist them with water or a grooming spray. Clean the bird at least once a week. Make an appointment with the vetrinarian when a nail or feather trimming is needed.

    7

    Keep the cockatoo busy. Give the bird a variety of toys to play with and rotate them on an ongoing basis. Cockatoos need to stay active and toys will help them exercise and keep their attention.

Jumat, 25 Mei 2012

What to Feed an Eclectus

The rare and colorful eclectus parrot originated in the South Pacific. Today they can be found in the lowland forests and rainforests of Northeastern Australia, Indonesian Archipelago, Lesser Sundas, New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. The eclectus has now made its way into zoos and the homes of bird enthusiasts in the United States. Feeding on a diet of soft prepared foods, fresh fruits and vegetables, and dry nuts and seeds helps the parrots replicate the natural diet they seek in the wild.

Soft Moist Foods

    The main diet for eclectus parrots is a mixture of soft foods. Eighty percent of their daily food intake should include a mixture of water soaked foods and moist fresh fruits and vegetables, according to The Parrot Society of Australia. Create an equal part mixture of water soaked barley, gray sunflower seeds, mung beans and wheat. Add an equal amount of fresh vegetables and fruits to the soaked food. Offer adult parrots at least 1 cup of moist foods per day.

    All moist food should be served in a stainless steel bowl, once a day. Remove the soft food from the bird cage after an hour and discard the food before bacteria begins to grow. Sanitize the feeding bowl with a solution of 10 parts hot water, one part bleach. Rinse thoroughly, and allow the bowls to cool and dry before using again.

Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

    Nesting high in the tops of rainforest trees, eclectus parrots enjoy feeding on sun ripened fruits and vegetables, nectar and blossoms in their native habitat. When domesticated, it is important to provide a similar varied diet of fresh foods.
    Offer the parrot a mixture of chopped apple, banana, cantaloupe, grapes, mango, oranges, pear, passion fruit and watermelon. Eclectus parrots require a diet high in beta carotene and vegetable protein and a limited amount of fat to store vitamins A, E and D. Vegetables, including beets, fresh corn on the cob, celery and peas may also be added to the soft food bowl.

Dry Foods

    The Parrot Society of Australia recommends a dry seed diet for 20 percent of the eclectus' daily food intake. A food bowl containing the dry mixture may be left in the cage throughout the day. Using their downward curving hooked bill, eclectus parrots enjoy cracking nuts. Almonds, peanuts and walnuts are among their favorites. Commercial budgie (also known as parakeet) seed mixes, dry hooked bill maintenance pellet foods and gray sunflower seeds should be added to a mix of nuts. Dry treats include hard dog biscuits and dry chicken bones. Offer a fresh bowl of approximately one-fifth of a cup of dry foods each morning. Always have fresh cool water available for the parrot.

Care for Bringing a Baby Cockatoo Home

Care for Bringing a Baby Cockatoo Home

Cockatoos are intelligent birds that delight their owners with comical movements and curiosity. Because of their playfulness and the attention they demand, they require planning and forethought before bringing home your baby cockatoo. Cockatoos are such inquisitive animals that they will become destructive if bored. They need to play in a safe home with plenty of affection and socializing. Plan ahead and prepare the optimal home environment for your new family member.

Instructions

    1

    Purchase a large cage or aviary for your baby cockatoo, with plenty of room to roam. Make sure the cage is secure, because cockatoos are well-known escape artists. The cage should be stainless steel and should not have any zinc or paint, because your bird will chew on the bars. The bars should be no more than half an inch apart. Choose a rectangular cage with a removable tray for easy cleaning.

    2

    Place toys and items of interest in the cage to occupy your baby cockatoo. These active birds get bored quickly, so they need durable toys that keep them busy and will withstand the force of their strong beaks. Include non-toxic branches for perches and food and water containers. Some cockatoos enjoy taking baths, so you may wish to provide a small bath pan at the bottom of the cage.

    3

    Gather appropriate food supplies. Cockatoos will require large hookbill seed mix. You may also supplement your baby bird's diet with lots of fruits and vegetables as well as cheese, hard-boiled eggs, canned dog food and cooked meat bones.

    4

    Educate yourself on symptoms of illness so you can react quickly if your baby cockatoo is sick. Watch for puffed feathers, decreased appetite, discharge from the nose, increased sleep, closed eyes during waking periods, weight loss, vomiting, loose feces, a change in temperament, frequent sneezing or bleeding. Purchase styptic powder or cornstarch to help stop bleeding in case of an injury.

    5

    Consult with an avian veterinarian before you bring home your baby cockatoo. Ask your desired vet about their experience with cockatoos, because some veterinarians do not treat birds.

    6

    Set up the cage at eye level in a frequently visited room in your home so your baby cockatoo can interact often with the family in a sunny and bright environment.

How to Make a Nesting Box for a Female Cockatiel

How to Make a Nesting Box for a Female Cockatiel

A cockatiel pair that is getting ready to nest will look for a suitable place to lay and care for their eggs. If you have caged cockatiels, you will be responsible for making this provision. But there is no need to run out and purchase a fancy nesting box. Cockatiels are not picky and will nest in any type of semi-enclosed space that is suitable in size. A cardboard box will work fine for this purpose and can be easily disposed of afterward.

Instructions

    1

    Find a cardboard box that is large enough to fit your cockatiel pair comfortably, yet small enough to fit in the cage without causing an obstruction. A cardboard box approximately 10 by 10 inches should be suitable. A clean cardboard shipping box will work fine, but be sure that it was not used to maintain anything toxic that may cause harm to your birds.

    2

    Secure the flaps of the box with a strong packing tape that will inhibit the box from opening. The tape should be smoothed down against the surface of the box and free of any areas that may lift. Double-check that the flaps are fastened securely before introducing the nesting box to your cockatiels.

    3

    Cut a small hole in the center of the box with a utility knife. Make the hole big enough for the cockatiels to enter and exit comfortably. A hole approximately 3 inches in diameter should be sufficient, but be sure that you make a clean cut that is free from rough edges or any overhang of the cardboard. On the opposite side, also cut a few small holes for you to view the happenings later on.

    4

    Place a soft nesting material inside for the female cockatiel to lay her eggs, and for the newly hatched youngsters to stay warm. Shredded newsprint, pine shavings, timothy grass or hay works well to add comfort and warmth.

    5

    Place the box into the cockatiels cage in a clean corner of the cage bottom. The cockatiels should be able to enter the nesting box easily, and if secured at a height that is uncomfortable, they may not use it. Resting it gently on the cage bottom will ensure that it is secure and stable.

    6

    Check the nesting box periodically to see if the female has laid her eggs. To do this, peer through the small holes that you have made on the side but do not disturb the box itself. Discard the cardboard box when it is no longer needed for nesting.

Kamis, 24 Mei 2012

How to Care for Pheasant

Pheasants are relatively easy birds to care for. They are a good choice if you are just beginning to raise game birds. There are several things to consider when caring for adult pheasants, but if you take care of the basics, your flock can thrive.

Instructions

    1

    Choose litter for the pen carefully. Straw or burlap is recommended. You can also purchase brooder paper at feed shops. Some breeders have found pheasants eating wood shavings. This can be a health issue, especially in young chicks.

    2

    Feed a pheasant the appropriate amount of protein. Young chicks require more than adults. Adults require additional protein during the breeding season. Feed stores offer different blends formulated to meet nutritional needs. The amount of protein varies by blend, so you can find something for every age and season.

    3

    Give a pheasant extra corn in the winter and vary the diet so they don't get bored. These animals require a higher carbohydrate diet during this time to keep warm. Peanuts and mealworms are a favorite treat. They also enjoy fruits and vegetables.

    4

    Leave plenty of room for the pheasants. Adult pheasants require approximately 5 square feet per animal. It is essential that they are not overcrowded. Some breeders have reported the pheasants turning on one another and becoming cannibalistic if there is not enough space.

    5

    Separate pheasants of different ages to avoid disease. If you are adding to your flock, quarantine the new animals for at least one month before mixing them with other birds.

    6

    Clean the pheasants' area. Dirty pens attract rats. Rats are a danger because they spread disease. They also attract large predators who might want to eat your pheasants for dinner.

A Budgie's Diet

A Budgie's Diet

Budgies--also known as parakeets, shell parakeets, warbling grass parakeets and budgerigar--are small parrots native to Australia. When kept as pets, budgies require a varied diet that mimics foods found in the wild. A menu complete with seeds, pellets, fruits, nutritional supplements and fresh water increases a budgie's chance at living out his eight- to 10-year life span.

Packaged Foods

    Choose small packages of budgie seed blends for the freshest seed options. Seed in bulk bins might be more cost effective but are often stale, riddled with bugs and rarely sanitized. Avoid packaged foods with fattening fillers such as hulled oats. Pellet-based budgie diets are less fattening than seeds and offer more complete nutrition. The processed diet is entirely consumable, unlike a seed diet with leftover hulls. Grit should also be offered to aid in digestion.

Fresh Foods

    A healthy diet also includes daily offerings of fresh, chopped fruits and vegetables. Budgies that subsist on seed-only diets often suffer vitamin A deficiencies. Uncooked spinach, bok choy, shredded carrots, broccoli florets, peas, citrus fruits, bananas, strawberries and cored apple chunks gives a budgie natural sources of vitamins and nutrients. Cuttle bones, mineral block and calcium chews offer additional nutrients for pet budgies and a gentle way for them to file their beaks. Fresh, cool water should be offered daily.

Extras

    Treats add variety to a budgie's diet but should only be fed once every two months to avoid unwanted weight gain. These include spray millet, seed bells and seed-based treat sticks. To keep a pet budgie healthy, add vitamin and mineral supplements to the water or food supply. This added boost is especially beneficial to the bird's immune system during times of stress.

Preparation

    Thoroughly wash fresh fruits and vegetables offered to budgies to remove any pesticides or waxes applied at the growers or the grocery store. If possible, purchase organic foods. Chop all foods to small, pea-sized bites. Thick-skinned treats, such as bananas or oranges, should be peeled. Discard all stones, pits, seeds and stems before feeding them to the bird. After the bird has enjoyed the fresh foods for a few hours, remove them to prevent ingestion of spoiled foods.

Precautions

    Even if they seem like a member of the family, budgies cannot tolerate some treats humans enjoy. Chocolate, alcohol, processed snack foods (chips, candy), caffeine and soda can make the bird very ill and even cause death. Other foods to avoid include dried fruits, avocado, asparagus, eggplant, cabbage, raw potato, rhubarb and milk.

How to Make Small Parrot Food

How to Make Small Parrot Food

Many small parrot owners like to make their own homemade parrot food to ensure that all the ingredients they are feeding their birds are fresh, full of wholesome nutrients and additive-free. Each species of bird has different dietary requirements, so any homemade diet should only complement high-quality commercial bird pellets developed specifically for your breed of bird. But It's a Grey's World offers simple recipes you can prepare to keep your feathered friends happy and you can enjoy yourself.

Instructions

    1

    Cook 1 cup bulgur in 2 cups of water in a large covered pot over medium heat for 10 minutes. Add one 10 oz. package of frozen organic corn kernels and 1/2 pound of washed kale or collard greens torn into small pieces. Heat the mixture for 10 more minutes, stirring occasionally. You can freeze individual portions to feed to your bird later.

    2

    Mix together 1/2 cup of chopped organic sprouts, one-third organic mango, 2 tbsp. peeled and diced cilantro, one small jalapeno pepper peeled and diced with seeds, freshly squeezed juice from one lime. Other vegetables may be added to your bird's preference. Serve immediately.

    3

    Cook 2 lbs. of quartered apples until they are soft in a large, covered saucepan with enough water to prevent sticking. Press the cooked apples through a sieve or food mill, discarding seeds and peels. Return the apple pulp to the saucepan and bring to a boil, adding enough water to keep it from sticking. Spread 1 cup of the applesauce mixture over the top of a 12-inch pita bread. Top with half a peeled and sliced organic kiwi, three sliced organic strawberries and one thinly sliced peeled and cored apple. Bake in a 350-degree oven for 15 minutes or serve as is.

Rabu, 23 Mei 2012

How to Feed a Red Rumped Parakeet

How to Feed a Red Rumped Parakeet

The red rumped parakeet is a small, bluish-green parrot, measuring approximately 270 mm in length. Only the male of this species has a dull red rump, while the female has pale blue feathers on its shoulders with green feathers on the rump and tail. Native to southeast Australia, the red rumped parakeet has a tendency to get aggressive and should be housed alone or in pairs. In the wild, these birds enjoy foraging on a wide variety of foods. Feed your red rumped parakeet a nutritionally-balanced diet of seeds, grains, fruits and vegetables to ensure its health and well-being.

Instructions

    1

    Offer your red rumped parakeet a combination of seed and grain as part of its basic diet. Feed it a teaspoon measure of canary seeds, sunflower seeds, hemp seeds, millets, groats and oats.

    2

    Coat the seed and grain mix with wheat germ oil before feeding. Wheat germ oil serves as a nutritional supplement for your bird, conditions its feathers and prevents egg binding in hens. Mix 1/2 tsp of wheat germ oil with every pound of seed and grain mix that you serve.

    3

    Feed small shreds of raw greens such as spinach, endive, lettuce, chickweed, broccoli tops and carrot tops. Green beans, peas, carrots and corn on the cob are other vegetables that you can offer your red rumped parakeet.

    4

    Offer a variety of fruits as treats. Cut a small piece from fruit such as apple, pear, orange or any seasonal fruit and offer it to your pet bird.

    5

    Place 1/2 a teaspoon of oyster shell grit or cuttlebone in a small bowl in your red rumped parakeet's cage at all times. The grit and cuttlebone will help your pet bird digest its food and also provide vital calcium.

Rainbow Lorikeets Diet

Rainbow lorikeets are a tropical Australian bird, so named for for their beautifully colored plumage. Only consider owning a rainbow lorikeet if you are up to the challenge of caring for the bird. A rainbow lorikeet's diet is highly specialized and messy and requires a greater level of care than other bird species. If you can care properly for the rainbow lorikeet and meet its special dietary needs, it will make a great companion animal.

Diet

    A wild rainbow lorikeet's diet typically includes flowers, nectars, fruit and seeds. Replicate this diet for your pet rainbow lorikeet by making nectar or buying a commercially produced nectar. You will have to take special care with the nectar, as it can spoil rapidly and needs to be changed many times per day to avoid getting your rainbow lorikeet sick. In warm weather you must give your rainbow lorikeet fresh nectar roughly every four hours.

    You will also need to provide foods that replicate the other parts of a wild rainbow lorikeet's natural diet. Feed your rainbow lorikeet organic, chemical-free fruits like kiwis, pomegranates or apples. Flowers are an essential part of a wild rainbow lorikeet's diet, so provide yours with roses, pansies or dandelions. Be sure the flowers, like the fruit, are chemical- and pesticide-free.

    Feed your rainbow lorikeet dry foods like oats, seeds or multi-grain cereals. Bread softened with honey and milk makes a special treat or food for infants after breeding season.

Considerations and Warnings

    Due to the high volume of liquid in their diet, rainbow lorikeets are messy eaters. They also produce large quantities of wet, messy droppings. You will have to clean your rainbow lorikeet's cage at least once daily. Keep the cage or aviary away from carpet and on a surface that you can clean easily.

    Several foods are poisonous to all birds, including your rainbow lorikeet. Never feed your rainbow lorikeet avocado, alcohol, caffeine, human junk foods, or dairy products. Most importantly, never feed your rainbow lorikeet chocolate as even a small amount can be lethal.

    A wide variety of household plants and fruit pits can also be harmful to your rainbow lorikeet. Some of the more common examples include aloe vera, apricot pits, daisies, plum leaves and pit, tomatoes, and hydrangea. For a full list of harmful household plants and foods, see the third link under references.

How to Breed Society Finches

How to Breed Society Finches

The society finch, also called the Bengalese finch, comes in a variety of colors, including gray, chestnut, pearl and fawn. These sociable birds breed easily in captivity, so the responsible bird owner will be sure he or she can find suitable homes for all the babies before deciding to breed. These finches readily take to parenthood, and will hybridize with many other species of finches, as well as foster orphans of similar species. In fact, many finch-keepers complain that it is difficult to get these birds to stop breeding.

Instructions

    1

    Separate one male and one female society finch from your flock. Sexing the birds properly can be difficult, as males and females are identical in appearance. The males are far more likely to sing than the female, and may perform a mating dance by stretching his neck and fluffing his feathers, bouncing on the perch in the presence of a female.

    2

    Place the finches in a spacious, clean cage (at least 18 inches wide, 12 inches tall, and 12 inches deep. The cage should have at least two perches, and healthy food and clean water should be available at all times. The cage should be in a quiet, low-traffic area, out of direct sunlight and away from drafts. If there is no natural lighting in the room, artificial full-spectrum lighting should be provided.

    3

    Provide nests or nesting materials. Safe nesting material includes cotton, twigs and pesticide-free dried grass. String is not advisable, as it may get tangled around legs and feet. Alternatively, you may hang a basket or nesting box. There are many designs of ready-made bird nests sold in pet stores, and some were designed especially with finches in mind.

    4

    The female will begin sitting on the eggs once she has a clutch of three to seven eggs. She will sit for approximately 13 days. Chicks will fledge in approximately 18 to 25 days and are independent in another two to three weeks.

Selasa, 22 Mei 2012

Drip Type Bird Watering Stations

Drip Type Bird Watering Stations

Birds need fresh, clean drinking water to be healthy. The drinking water must not have harmful chemicals and must contain minimal bacteria. Bird farmers also want to minimize water waste, thus reducing the costs of raising the birds. Manufacturers have developed a lot of tools that help farmers more easily provide water to their birds.

Nipple Drinker

    Nipple drinkers drip water downward so that little birds can sip out of the nipples. Some of the water drops from the bird's mouths and lands in a tray, where birds can sip water, thus eliminating water waste. However, birds can defecate and drop food in the trays, which can create an environment for bacterial growth. So owners must frequently clean the trays. However, the trays also keep excessive moisture from getting into the litter, which minimizes the maintenance needed. Some drinking systems do not have drip trays but release such a small quantity of water that the waste is minimal. The nipple drinker is one of the most reliable and sanitary ways to deliver water to the birds. This system has very good pressure control so that the system can gauge how much water it releases. The rinsing system helps keep the water clean. Water-level indicators let the owner know if the drinking system has suitable water for the birds. Water travels through these systems in standard pipes that have valves. The nipple tube has stainless nipples that resist corrosion.

Water Connection Unit

    The water connection unit draws the water from the main water supply to the drinking system. The pressure regulator in the connector determines how fast the water flows. Pressure reducers help minimize the water pressure so that the water does not damage the system. Owners can install an optional filter that further increases the purity of the water.

Water Bottle Systems

    Many bird owners use water bottle systems that have balls that the birds must push into a tube to allow the water to come out. These systems frequently cause sanitation problems, since the water bottle can serve as a place for bacteria growth if not cleaned out and sanitized frequently.

Drip Bird Bath

    Some property owners create bird watering stations for wild birds, allowing them to attract these birds into the backyard or garden. The sound of dripping water attracts more birds than other kinds of bird baths. Property owners can create their own drip systems for the bird bath by putting a hole in the bottom of a can or jug and hanging the container from a tree branch over the bird bath.

How to Build a Sun Conure Aviary

How to Build a Sun Conure Aviary

Sun conures are brightly colored, small parrots that are popular in the pet trade. Sun conures enjoy the company of humans as well as their fellow conures. If you own multiple sun conures or are considering breeding, constructing an aviary for the birds to interact and fly is a good way to keep your birds happy and healthy. When constructing an aviary, consider the location of the aviary and the number of birds that will inhabit the aviary.

Instructions

    1

    Determine what size you want your aviary to be. Measure and cut the 2x4s the appropriate size for your aviary dimensions. Guidelines for keeping birds say that each bird should be allowed to fully stretch its wingspan, so calculate at least two square feet of personal space per bird.

    2

    Create four panels of equal size using the cut 2x4s and wire mesh. Use the staple gun to affix the wire mesh to the 2x4 that will serve as the bottom of the panel.

    3

    Finish the panel by stretching the wire tightly over the panel and staple it to the top of the panel. Cut off any excess wire using your wire cutters. Make sure that no sharp ends are showing over the 2x4.

    4

    Connect the panels to form the aviary. Place the aviary on firm, level ground. Nail the panels together firmly with your hammer, ensuring the nails are tightly in the wood.

    5

    Create the roof of the aviary by covering it with wire. If the aviary will be exposed to the elements, you may want to consider stretching a tarp over the roof to provide protection from sun and rain.

Senin, 21 Mei 2012

Homemade Hummingbird Liquid

Homemade Hummingbird Liquid

Hummingbirds are amazing birds to watch. If you have a hummingbird feeder to attract these birds to your yard, don't bother purchasing nectar from the store. Not only is nectar costly, the hummingbirds may actually be deterred by some of the ingredients. Make your own hummingbird liquid for the feeder using common household ingredients. You will be surprised at how much the hummingbirds love the homemade nectar.

Instructions

    1

    Fill a medium saucepan with 4 cups of water. Place the pan on the stove, and bring the water to a boil.

    2

    Add 1 cup granulated white sugar to the pan. Stir constantly with a spoon until the sugar has dissolved completely.

    3

    Remove the pan from the heat. Allow it to cool for a few hours to room temperature.

    4

    Fill your hummingbird feeder with the homemade liquid nectar. Store any unused portion of the liquid in the refrigerator in an air-tight container for up to two weeks.

How to Get Rid of Cockatiels

How to Get Rid of Cockatiels

Cockatiels are parrots. The birds live about 20 years, so purchasing and caring for cockatiels requires a lengthy investment of time. Cockatiels are very social, so if you are not going to be home much it is best to keep at least two birds. If you decide owning a cockatiel is not right for you, or if you must give up your bird, there are a variety of ways this can be accomplished.

Instructions

    1

    Take out an ad in your local paper. Some papers will run sale ads for free for a week; otherwise they charge by the word. This method is best if you want to get to know the people who will be taking your bird.

    2

    List your bird for sale on craigslist.org or another website such as Cockatiels For Sale to reach a larger number of people. This method may require you to transport the bird.

    3

    Contact your local pet store. Many pet stores will purchase animals in good health either for cash or store credit. You will not get as much for your bird as you would from a direct sale because the pet store needs to re-sell the cockatiel at a profit.

    4

    Call your local animal shelter. Some shelters will take exotic pets. You will not be paid for the bird, however, and there is no guarantee that your bird will be adopted.

    5

    Put up an ad on billboards around town or at work. Many grocery stores and other businesses have bulletin boards that allow people to post local items for sale or to give them away.

    6

    Donate your bird to a school or nursing home. Not all facilities will accept animals, but some schools and nursing homes like to have pets to teach responsibility or to offer companionship.

Minggu, 20 Mei 2012

List of Cockatiel Treats to Make at Home

Many recipes to make homemade treats for cockatiels are available. Once you know what kind of foods you can feed the birds, there's no limit to the creativity you can use to create a variety of healthy snacks. It is however, important to note that treats must not replace a daily, balanced diet and should only be given in moderation.

Honey Nut and Fruit Treats

    Use pure honey and a variety of ingredients, such as apples, cranberries or blueberries; almonds or walnuts; shredded coconut; and millet seeds. Purchase dried fruit or dry your own with a food dehydrator. All larger fruits and nuts must be chopped into pieces and the coconut shredded. Combine the fruits, nuts and seeds, using more seed and less fruit and nuts, and add enough honey to bind the ingredients together. Stir in 1 or 2 tbsp. of flour and knead the mixture by hand, adding more flour as required to create a firm dough that no longer sticks to the bowl. Roll out the dough into cookie or stick shapes as desired, and place on a greased cookie sheet or tray. Bake in a preheated oven at 350 degrees F for five minutes or until hard. Cool completely before serving.

Egg Treats

    Use a large, hard-boiled egg for this treat. Mash the whole egg together with a fork and place it in the toaster oven or grill for five minutes or less, just enough to absorb some of the moisture. Then serve as a snack with a piece of fruit or a favorite shredded vegetable placed on top. Remove any leftovers within an hour and dispose of them.

Cookie Treats

    Bake these treats in the oven and include the ingredients in any combination. Finely chop vegetables to add including celery, broccoli and shredded carrot. Include fruits such as apple, or fresh or dried cranberries (or other berries). Include seeds such as millet or a cockatiel seed mixture. Add cornmeal, wheat flour and protein powder as well as crushed cockatiel food pellets for extra nutrition. Mix the chopped and grated vegetables and fruits together with about 3/4 cup of cornmeal, 1 tsp. protein powder and 1/4 cup of seeds. Using less vegetables and fruits will ensure the mixture binds more easily. Add just enough water or honey to bind the ingredients, and then stir in wheat flour as needed until the mixture no longer sticks to the sides of the bowl. Roll dough into 1-inch balls and flatten into cookie shapes; bake on a lightly greased tray at 350 degrees F for about 25 minutes or until firm.

Yogurt Treat

    Crush and add cockatiel food pellets (three or four) to 1 cup of yogurt, mashed strawberries, honey and one or two raw eggs. Stir in enough flour and water to make a biscuit dough. Pour the mixture into a lightly greased pan and bake at 350 degrees F for 35 to 40 minutes. Cool and cut into slices.

Monk Parakeet Diet

Monk Parakeet Diet

Popular as caged birds, monk parakeets are gentle, easy-to-train birds with simple diets when kept as pets. In the wild, they are considered by some to be problematic for their garden and field damage. Monk parakeets prefer lowland areas such as orchards, savannas, woods and farmlands inhabited by humans. Always following civilization, the monk parakeet is at the center of controversy concerning its place in the wild.

Features

    Native to Brazil and central Argentina, monk parakeets are found all over the world and are part of the parrot species. The monk parrot has a green body, grayish-blue neck, forehead, breast, face and chest, and blue and yellow coloring. Twelve inches in height, the monk parakeet is known in the parrot family as the only member who can build a breeding nest, which is a highly-advanced, two-room endeavor. As pets, monk parakeets were introduced to the United States and Europe from South America in the 1960s.

City Dweller Diet

    According to the University of Tennessee's Institute for Biological Invasions website, the monk parakeet commonly dines on ornamental or exotic fruit and seed-bearing urban garden plants, which can be irritating to homeowners. The product of irresponsible pet owners releasing monk parakeets into the wild in the 1960s, feral populations of monk parakeets are able to live on bird feeder seeds and seed-producing garden plants as a year-round diet source.

Farming Worries

    While the monk parakeet has not destroyed European or North American agriculture like other wild birds, many believe it eventually will become a threat, according to the Institute for Biological Invasions website. As a measure against this, the U.S. Forest Service attempted to eliminate the monk parakeet populations from the wild, but failed. Since the attempt, the parakeet monk has become a major cause for many environmental and animal rights groups.

Farm Unfriendly-Diet

    In the wild, monk parakeets are granivorous, or primarily seed-eaters. Common seeds in the monk parakeet diet include seeds from the Poaceae, Asteraceae and Cyperacea families, which are available year-round. In February and September, the monk parakeet dines on maize and sunflower seeds. To many farmers' dismay, monk parakeets have been known to eat wheat, barley, millet, fruits, nuts, berries, rice and sorghum crops. The most damaged crop is maize. In the Buenos Aires Province of Argentina, monk parrots have brought agricultural problems for more than 60 years, but many blame the farming industry's practices and not the monk parrot.

Cage Diet

    When kept as a pet, monk parakeets need mixed grains, fruit, carrots and green vegetables.

Homemade Orange Oriole Feeders

Orange orioles, like all other oriole types, prefer sweet food. Their preferences include nectar, sugary fruit, flowers, bread, jelly and peas. A variety of food choices should be placed in the feeder to attract orioles. Although commercial feeders are available, homemade ones can be more economical and serve just as well.

Old Christmas Tree Feeder

    Even when the holidays are over, the Christmas tree can still be put to good use. Hanging fruit in its branches will attract orange orioles quite easily. Fruit hangings preferred by orange orioles are apples, bananas, berries, oranges and peaches. Pine cones can also be strewn around it, coated with grape or orange jelly, peanut butter or both.

Soda Bottle Feeder

    Punch holes on opposite sides a quarter up from the bottom of a soda bottle. Put a stick through the two holes, long enough to serve as perches for the birds. It is important for the holes to be slightly larger than the diameter of the stick so the birds can reach the food inside the bottle. With a funnel, fill the bottle with bits of bread or fruit. Moisture can be kept from accumulating by punching tiny holes at the bottom of the bottle. Hang the bottle by stringing some small rope or wire around the top and suspend the assembly on a tree branch.

Mesh Bag Feeder

    This feeder can serve well for suet (hardened rendered pork fat) rolled in peanut butter, berries, oranges, apples and bananas and bird seed. Find a mesh bag, like the ones onions are packaged in, and secure the suet inside. Tie a piece of string on top and hang it from a branch.

Beverage Carton Feeder

    Cut two large opposite holes on a paper carton (milk or juice). The windows should be large enough for the birds to reach the food inside. Coloring the box with crayons will make it more attractive for the birds. Fill the box with flowers, bread pieces or kitchen scraps. Tie a string through a hole at the top and find a suitable area to hang it in. Smaller cartons can be filled with some homemade or commercial nectar or jelly.

Food for Peacocks

Food for Peacocks

Choosing what to feed your peacock is not a decision to take lightly. Good nutrition is a key factor in keeping your bird healthy and happy. Knowing what to feed your peacock and how to provide needed vitamins and minerals in its diet will greatly increase its chances of living a long life.

Grains

    Feeding your peacock a mixture of grains will help give your bird the energy it needs. A mixture of barley, wheat and rice will provide the right balance of nutrition your peacock will need to supplement its diet.

Protein

    Peacocks need copious amounts of protein to stay healthy. They typically get much of their protein by eating insects but their diet should contain enough protein to make up for what they can't get on their own. Commercially purchased game bird crumble will provide your peacock with needed protein, as will dried cat food.

Greens

    Peacocks like their vegetables. Mixed greens, such as lettuces, spinach, and other legumes will provide your peacock with many essential vitamins they might have trouble forging for on their own.

How to Catch an Escaped Parakeet

How to Catch an Escaped Parakeet

Parakeets are a small to medium sized species of parrot that comes in a variety of bright colors. It has multiple subspecies, which are native to Australia, Asia, Africa, and South America. Domesticated parakeets are affectionate birds that love being a part of a human household. Occasionally a parakeet will escape the home where it lives, but domesticated parakeets are not able to care for themselves and most do not have any desire to do so. With the right tools, an escaped parakeet can often be encouraged to come back home.

Instructions

    1

    Chase after the parakeet when it first escapes and try to see where it lands. When it lands, call out to it and approach it slowly. Invite the bird to fly to your finger, using a basic "up" command. If the bird flies away again and the weather is warm, spray the bird lightly with a hose. The water will weigh the bird down and throw it off balance, forcing it to land. Drop a light towel or pillowcase on top of the bird and wrap it securely.

    2

    If you lose sight of the parakeet, alert others about it. Place "Lost Bird" ads in highly visible places in the area and for miles around, since escaped birds can travel far. Tell friends and neighbors about the lost bird and ask them to keep their eyes open for it. Contact animal rescue organizations and veterinarians within fifty miles of the location where the bird was lost and give them a description of the bird.

    3

    Place a bird cage in a highly visible place in the front yard or wherever else the parakeet was last seen. Put food and water inside of the cage. Appoint people to constantly watch for the parakeet's return and close the cage door if the bird enters the cage.

    4

    Tempt the parakeet to return with other birds. If another parakeet is available to use and the weather is good, place the parakeet in a closed cage next to the open cage in the front yard. Play recordings of parakeet calls to encourage the escaped parakeet to return.

Sabtu, 19 Mei 2012

What Do Cacatua Eat?

What Do Cacatua Eat?

There are about 21 species of cockatoo, genus Cacatua. The cockatoo has a powerful bill, short legs with strong feet and plumage that ranges from pure white with pale yellow or pink underwings, tail and crest, to pink to gray to black. It's native to New Guinea, Indonesia and parts of Australia, and can also be found in New Zealand. They live in tropical and subtropical rain forests as well as parks and gardens.

Habits

    The cockatoo is an intelligent, tough and demanding bird (in captivity). They're noisy, intensely attached to their owner and inquisitive. They can live for decades in the wild and a well cared for pet bird can live an average of 65 years, but can live up to 120 years. In the wild cockatoos gather in great screeching flocks in open fields and on farmlands to feed. They roost in trees at night. The cockatoo's diet is quite varied.

Seeds and Grain

    The cockatoo eats the seeds of the gully gum and other eucalyptus trees. The seeds dropped in great numbers from native wattle trees might also be on the cockatoo's menu. Cockatoos eat the seeds of the kanari and black bean trees. Palm cockatoos also eat the seeds excreted by cassowaries, possibly because the seeds have been softened by passage through the larger bird's gut. The powerful beak of a cockatoo can crack the shell that hides the seed of the casuarina tree. The casuarina is a delicate looking but tough tree and its seeds are encased in cones few birds can crack -- except for the cockatoo. The cockatoo also eats recently sprouted grain crops like wheat or barley.

Fruit

    The cockatoo eats the buds and fruit of the nonda tree and the banksia, a native Australian tree grown in gardens. The tree grows 13 to 50 feet tall and the bird is attracted to the golden fuzzy flowers that contain nectar. (The banksia is also called the honeysuckle.) Later the banksia's seed pods pop open like clam shells. Cockatoos will also feast on the fruit of the walking palm (Pandanus), a tree that grows to 20 feet tall, has sharp spines on the edges of its leaves and produces an orange-red segmented fruit.

Roots, Tubers and Insects

    The cockatoo will dig up and eat corms like taro. It might dig up the rhizomes of ginger, whose origins are in Oceania, and eat the more tender leaves, stalks and flowers of wild ginger. It can also dig up the rhizomes of turmeric and eat the young shoots and tips. Cockatoos will also eat insects and their larvae.

How to Care for Ringneck Doves

How to Care for Ringneck Doves

Ringneck doves are the most common doves kept as pets. Ringneck doves can be wonderful companions, but they do require care to keep them happy and healthy. Ringneck doves, like all birds, require food, water, and shelter.

Instructions

    1

    Select a cage to house your ringneck dove. This cage should be large enough for the bird to flap its wings without touching the bars with the tips of its wings. Two ringneck doves can be kept comfortably in a 2-by-2-foot cage. The width and length are more important than the height to ensure that the doves have enough room. Be sure to keep the cage clean by wiping it with a bird-safe disinfectant several times a week.

    2

    Place one or two bird perches inside the cage. Perches can be purchased at a pet store or specialty bird store. Tell the salesperson you would like perches that are suitable for ringneck doves.

    3

    Place three dishes on the bottom of the cage, away from the perches so they will not get droppings in them. One dish should have fresh water put in it daily. Another should be filled with the dove's food. Ringneck doves can be fed a wild birdseed mix or small hookbill bird mix. Talk with a salesperson at a local pet store or specialty bird store to see what seed mix he suggests. The third dish should contain bird grit and oyster shells, also available at pet stores. This will help the bird to chew its food.

    4

    Place a large bowl at the bottom of the cage with freshwater in it every one to two weeks. Ringneck doves enjoy bathing themselves and will use this bowl to do so. If the dove does not bathe itself, use a clean spray bottle with fresh water to mist the bird every week or two.

    5

    Provide treats for your dove occasionally. You can fasten green vegetables such as lettuce to the bars of the cage using safety pins. The birds will nibble on the greens from their perches. You can also chop up green vegetables and place them in their food dish. Ringneck doves enjoy cottage cheese, cous cous, mashed sweet potatoes, mashed hardboiled eggs, and carrots.

    6

    Allow your dove to fly around a closed-off room several times a week. Just like other animals, ringneck doves require exercise to stay healthy and happy.

The Feeding Habits of Penguins

A penguin does not have the ability to fly, but can swim through the world's oceans with ease. Within its marine environment, it depends predominantly on krill to survive. Krill -- small shrimp-like crustaceans -- come in a variety of sizes to feed both the petite Adlie penguins and the large king or emperor penguins.

Food Requirements and Fasting

    Penguins subsist primarily on krill, but they will also catch squid and small fish. Most penguins, despite their size, require about 2 pounds of food per day during the busy summer months; in the harsh winter, the penguin can subsist on a third of that, according to Penguin Science. During the breeding season, the birds will undergo fasting. Some continue to fast through the egg-laying process and egg incubation. Penguins will also fast during molting season or when a juvenile chick first gets its feathers. The bird will subsist off its stored fat layer when fasting. When a young chick undergoes the growth of its first adult feathers, its physical growth will cease until feeding resumes. Depending on the species of penguin, the period of fasting may last 54 to 120 days.

Hunting and Catching Prey

    When hunting for food, the penguin will dive to a depth of up to 114 feet. The bird relies upon its keen eyesight to locate the krill, squid or small fish. The penguin does not have teeth, but it will grasp its prey with its sharp beak. The interior sides of the bird's beak have sharp spines, and its tongue also boasts sharp spike-like protrusions that help the penguin hold on to its food tightly. It swallows its food whole. The penguin can hunt well even under in the dark depths of the ocean with remarkably little light but it cannot hunt in full darkness.

Hunting

    The hunting range of the penguin varies among species and also the seasons of the year. The Adelie penguin will usually hunt within 9 miles of the colony. King penguins have been known to hunt up to 559 miles from the colony, and emperor penguins at distances of about 900 miles, according to Seaworld. The penguins will often utilize seal holes in the ice to reach the ocean water. A female penguin may travel up to 50 miles across the frozen land to find the open ocean and hunt. She will consume an ample amount of food and return to feed her chick by regurgitation.

Decline From Lack of Food

    The birds can hunt singularly or as a group. Emperor penguins often stay gone from the colony for up to two months when hunting if they have to cover a substantial distance to reach abundant krill. The changing ecosystem and global warming have caused a lack of krill to occur. In some areas of the world, the penguin population has declined by 50 percent from lack of food; chinstrap and Adelie penguin colonies have shown one of the most serious declines, according to Science Daily.

How to Give Pumpkins to Parrots

How to Give Pumpkins to Parrots

According to Winged Wisdom, pumpkin adds calcium, potassium, phosphorus and vitamin A to a parrot's diet. You can use pumpkin to spice up a parrot's normal diet and to keep it interested in its food. You may also save money on parrot food by throwing in pumpkin that is left over from your own cooking.

Instructions

    1

    Cut a pumpkin in half, from top to bottom.

    2

    Scoop out the pulp and seeds, removing the stringy bits.

    3

    Spread the seeds flat on a cookie sheet.

    4

    Bake the seeds at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 35 to 40 minutes until they are dry.

    5

    Place the seeds in a resealable plastic bag after they have cooled and place them in the freezer until you are ready to use them.

    6

    Cut the pumpkin halves into manageable wedges and cut away the hard rind.

    7

    Cut the wedges into inch-size chunks.

    8

    Place the wedges into resealable plastic bags and seal them up, and place them in the freezer until you are ready to use them.

Jumat, 18 Mei 2012

Raising Gouldian Finches

Raising Gouldian Finches

The Gouldian finch is a rare bird of beauty with elegant and exquisite plumage colors. Also called the rainbow or painted finch, there are not many left in the wild. Many people like to have them as pets, and being a bit of a delicate bird, one should know how to take care of them. Caring for Gouldian finches is not difficult, but just requires the correct knowledge about their habits and environment.

Maintain a Proper Environment

    One of the most important points to keep in mind while caring for Gouldian finches is their environment. They do not take well to changes and can get highly stressed, which in turn affects their health, as the increased stress levels reduce their immunity. The factors in the environment to be noted are the placement of their cage and the temperature.

    The Gouldian finch is a relatively small bird but requires a fair amount of space to move around. Ideally they will thrive in a bird room, but a cage having a height of around 25 inches and length of 30 inches should do fine. Proper ventilation is important, but also care should be taken that the cage is not in a place getting a direct draft of cold air. Once the cage is placed at a particular location, it should not be moved around, as this will stress the bird. These birds like sunlight, and if possible the cage should be where they can get plenty of it. But again their cage should not be moved around just to get sunlight.

    Gouldian finches are susceptible to temperature changes, and a sudden drop in temperature can be fatal to the bird. Ideally the temperature can be 75 degrees Fahrenheit, or a little warmer. There are instances where these birds have been bred in temperatures as low as 40 degrees, and before buying one, you should know the ideal temperature for the bird, from the breeder. Generally these birds take to warmer temperatures and they also are known to breed when the temperature is upward of 55 degrees.

Put Mutliple Birds Together

    Gouldian finches are social birds and require a companion Finch. They are sociable to their own species and do much care to be petted or held. They like to be around their own kind, and a solitary Gouldian finch will not survive in captivity. Gouldian finches should have at least one cage mate of their own species, although a small flock of four to five birds is ideal for their social well-being.

Feeding Gouldian Finches

    Managing a proper diet is an important aspect of caring for Gouldian finches. These birds require a good amount of protein and calcium in their diet, especially in their breeding season. Meal worms and eggs are a good source of protein and can be kept in the feeding cup of their cages. A separate cup can be kept which has greens like lettuce, celery and so on. A cuttlebone has calcium and feeding the bird with this, will also provide a good aid to its digestion.

When Do African Greys Begin to Talk?

When Do African Greys Begin to Talk?

African Grey birds are one of the most common species of parrots kept as pets. With time and patience, some African Grey birds can learn to mimic the human voice and other noises in its home environment.

Time Frame

    As a general rule, African Grey birds will begin to talk at 1 to 2 years of age. A few birds can learn to speak at 4 to 6 months old. Some African Grey birds never talk, and some birds do not become vocal, making only household noises.

Potential

    The African Grey's learning process for sounds begins with clicks and whistles. Eventually, an African Grey can pick up some human words and begin to try to sound out the words itself. African Greys can pick up a multitude of noises and phrases, ranging from the sound of a telephone to the sound of a toilet flushing to two-way arguments.

Tips

    Begin speaking to your African Grey at an early age to help it pick up sounds. African Greys pay attention to an excited and animated tone of voice, so use caution when using colorful language around the bird.

Parakeet Tips

Parakeet Tips

Parakeets, also known as budgies in some parts of the world, are bright tropical birds. Parakeets are popular pets because they enjoy human interaction, can be trained and are relatively easy to care for. A well-cared for pet parakeet can live up to 15 years.

Diet

    Feed a parakeet a commercially prepared bird food that consists of seeds. Choose a mix without artificial colors or additives, if possible. Add variety to your parakeet's diet each day with fresh foods like kale, broccoli, papaya, apples and carrots. Remove any pits, which can be fatal to a parakeet. Cut these foods into pieces small enough for the parakeet to take with one bite. Attach a mineral block to the cage that the parakeet will use when it wants. Replace the mineral block when necessary.

Play and Exercise

    Parakeets are social creatures. They are happiest when they have another parakeet to interact with, or plenty of human interaction. Spend at least half and hour a day stroking, talking to and playing with a parakeet. Parakeets also need exercise outside of a cage. Let it fly around a home for several hours each day.

Cage

    The parakeet cage must be wide enough to allow the birds to fly short distances. For one or two parakeets, the cage must be 39 inches wide, 20 inches tall and 32 inches deep. It must be high enough for the birds to climb for more exercise. The cage should be cleaned daily to remove bird droppings and spilled food. Insert branches from poplar or willow trees to serve as natural perches. Do not use branches from poisonous trees such as acacia, boxwood or oleander.

Toys

    Liven up your parakeet's cage with a few fun toys. Parakeets favor ladders, bells and chew toys. Any toy has to be large enough that the bird can't swallow it and clean enough for the bird to chew.

Parakeet Safety

    Never feed a parakeet chocolate, caffeine, avocados, cabbage, lemon or dried fruit. These foods, which are toxic to the birds, can't be left out when the birds are outside of the cage. Close all doors and windows before letting the bird out of its cage, put away household cleaners, and turn off ceiling fans. Put away any plants that might be toxic to parakeets, such as English Ivy, poinsettias and tulips.

Illness

    A parakeet that stays on the bottom of the cage, or shows marked changes in appetite or stool production, may be sick. If you notice these signs, or other strange behaviors from the bird, take the bird to a veterinarian.

Rabu, 16 Mei 2012

How to Make Food for Canaries

If your pet canaries are tiny nestlings or full grown birds, you'll want to make sure they receive enough nutrition to maintain their health. You can buy commercially prepared food or make your own fresh and natural canary food.

Instructions

Canary Seed Mix

    1

    Place 7 tbsp. good quality canary seed in a large mixing bowl.

    2

    Add 2 tbsp. rapeseed, 2 tsp. oat groats and 2 tsp. flax seeds.

    3

    Stir the mixture together well. Place the canary seed mix in an airtight container, and feed as needed.

Food for Nestling Canaries

    4

    Place 1 cup of Cream of Wheat cereal in a large mixing bowl, and stir in 1 cup of quick oatmeal and 1 cup of grits.

    5

    Add 1 cup shredded wheat cereal, 1 cup of dry milk, 1/4 cup of wheat raw germ, 3 tbsp. of poppy seeds, 1 tsp. of unflavored gelatin and 1/2 tsp. of bird vitamin powder and stir together thoroughly.

    6

    Store the food for nestling canaries in an airtight container until ready to use.

    7

    Mix 2 or 3 tbsp. of the mixture with one mashed hard boiled egg and 1 small grated carrot, feed it to the nestling canaries as needed.

Selasa, 15 Mei 2012

How to Build a Yellow Canary Bird House

How to Build a Yellow Canary Bird House

The canary, native to the Canary Islands, is a small bird in the finch family. In the wild, canaries often have a brownish-green coat, which resembles that of a sparrow. However, some captive mutations have been bred to exhibit a yellow coat, creating the yellow canary. Whether you are looking to attract wild yellow canaries in your yard or provide a home for your pet, building your own bird house can be a fun project.

Instructions

    1

    Draw out the dimensions of your bird house onto the sheet of plywood using a pencil. The outlines for each side of the house should be exact. Measure the front and back of the house at 6 1/2 inches by 8 5/8 inches. Measure the two sides at 5 inches by 6 1/2 inches. Measure the floor 6 1/2 inches by 6 1/2 inches. Measure floor attachment rails 6 inches by 1/2 inch. Measure one side of the roof 6 1/2 inches by 9 1/2 inches and the other side of the roof 6 inches by 9 1/2 inches.

    2

    Identify the front and back sides of the bird house as two rectangles measuring 6 1/2 inches by 8 5/8 inches. The sides measuring 6 1/2 inches are your top and bottom. The sides measuring 8 5/8 inches are the sides of the house. You will have to modify these two pieces later to define your roof slope.

    3

    Draw a dot or some kind of indicator on the 8 5/8-inch sides of the rectangle using a pencil. The dots should be 5 1/4 inches from the bottom. Also, place a dot at the top of the rectangle at the center point of the 6 1/2-inch side. Draw a line from each dot along the sides of the rectangle to the dot at the top-center. This triangle will shape your roof slope.

    4

    Cut out the sides of the house using a jigsaw. Cut a 1 1/2-inch diameter hole in the front of the bird house to act as an entrance. Cut a 1/4-inch hole below the entrance hole to fit a perch, which will be added later.

    5

    Lay your pieces on a worktable. Align the pieces to make sure all were cut to the proper dimensions. Look for obvious oversights. Construct the house by securing the pieces together using a hammer and nails. Inspect the bird house for holes after it is built. Fill the cracks where the sides of the house connect using wood glue.

    6

    Mount the floor attachments to the inside front and back wall of the house using a hammer and nails. The floor attachments should be parallel to the front and back wall to provide support for the bottom floor. Secure the floor to the floor attachments. Fill any cracks using wood glue.

    7

    Attach the roof halves to the front, back and side walls of the bird house. The roof halves should be situated into a triangular shape with the side measuring 6 1/2 inches overlapping the side measuring 6 inches. Fill the crack between the roof peak with waterproof glue.

    8

    Finish each side of the house using sandpaper. Insert a 1/4-inch dowel into the perch hole in the front of the bird house.