Minggu, 30 Oktober 2011

What Do You Put on the Floor of a Wire Cage?

What Do You Put on the Floor of a Wire Cage?

Wire cages are a popular housing choice for all kinds of pets, including dogs, rabbits, hamsters, birds and all sorts of small exotic animals. Wire cages are sturdy, difficult for animals to chew through or escape from, and easy to sterilize and clean. The downside of a wire cage is that the wire bars on the floor can be uncomfortable for your pet to stand or lie on for long periods of time.

Plastic

    It is normal for a wire pet cage to feature a plastic tray that goes in the bottom of the cage.The purpose of the tray is to keep your pet from spending long hours standing on uncomfortable metal bars as well as to keep bedding, food and bodily fluids inside the cage. Most of these trays are designed to slide out of the cage for easy removal and cleaning. Your pet should never be kept in a wire cage that does not have, at the very least, a plastic tray across the bottom for him to stand and lay on. Most owners choose to place bedding on top of the plastic tray to make their pets more comfortably. You can not keep bedding inside a cage without using a plastic tray to create a solid floor.

Shavings

    Wood shavings or pellets made of paper are popular bedding for small animals, such as hamsters, rabbits and guinea pigs. These absorbent materials are placed across the floor of the wire pet cage on top of the plastic tray. Shavings and pellets are absorbent enough to soak up spilled water and bodily fluids, while still providing a soft place for pets to walk, sit and lay down.

Fabric

    Fluffy dog beds, towels, blankets and all kinds of soft, fabric bedding can be used on top of a wire cage floor to keep your pet more comfortable. Fabric bedding is safe to use with large animals, but can put small animals who like to chew at risk due to the likelihood that they will ingest the material. For example, a dog or cat bed can be used in a wire cage where dogs or cats are kept, but should not be given to a hamster or other small animals.

Rubber Mats

    Rubber mats provide an easy to clean, well cushioned flooring for your wire cage. Rubber mats can be used independently or with additional bedding to provide a comfortable, safe floor for your pets to lay on.

Sabtu, 29 Oktober 2011

Custom Macaw Cage Ideas

Custom Macaw Cage Ideas

The macaw is a large bird that needs a good sized-habitat to keep it happy and healthy. When devoting this much space in the home to a cage such as the one needed for a macaw, a custom cage can help keep the room it's in from becoming a bird room, and instead make the cage--and its resident--a focal point for the home.

Reimagining Furniture

    Since macaws need a large amount of space--a cage that is at least 3-feet high, 4-feet wide and 5-feet deep--consider building the cage by starting with a piece of furniture. Visit some local furniture stores and other places that sell outdoor furniture for some ideas. If there is nothing of a suitable size such as a wardrobe that catches your eye, consider building a frame for the cage to make it look like a piece of antique furniture. A shelf in the bottom will make it easy to clean, while bars can be installed across the open areas to secure the bird. Another alternative is to pay a visit to the pet store and lay out a home cage similar to their large aviaries.

Permanent Fixtures

    A macaw can live up to 100 years, but in captivity a lifespan of anywhere from 50 to 65 years is expected. Since the bird will be likely to outlive some family members, a permanent structure in the home can be easily justified. A corner cage can be constructed in the corner of the room, with three or four sides to allow the bird to see as much of his surroundings as possible. An enclosed and heated porch is also a possibility, as this will allow the bird to watch not only the family, but what's going on outside.

    Since this is a permanent structure, be sure to take everything into consideration before starting construction. Macaws are intelligent and social, so make sure they will have continuous contact with the family. Be sure they are in a place where their noise won't be bothersome to people trying to work, sleep, or to the neighbors.

Hoods

    Whether the cage is being constructed out of wood or metal, include a recessed hood in the top of the cage for any light fixtures or fans that might be desired. The sides and front of the hood can be solid, hiding all the wiring and electronics that might be necessary to run the equipment used to regulate temperature or illuminate the cage during dreary winter months. Be sure to install a macaw-proof lining between the bird and the contents of the hood to ensure the bird won't damage the cage or be hurt by the electric equipment.

Cabinets

    Building drawers or cabinets in the bottom of the cage can be handy and help keep all the equipment and accessories needed in a convenient and out-of-sight place.

    Since the cabinet is going to be used solely for the macaw, tailor the cabinets and drawers to what's needed to keep the bird happy and healthy. Build a place to keep extra toys, chew sticks and perches, as macaws are known for chewing anything they can get into their beaks. A place for some airtight containers used to hold food and treats will be handy for restocking the cage, as well as ensuring that there's always a treat on hand for rewarding good behavior.

Kamis, 27 Oktober 2011

How to Buy Wild Pigeons

How to Buy Wild Pigeons

Wild pigeons are useful in training bird dogs and can often be obtained cheaply. The most difficult part of buying wild pigeons is finding a place to purchase them. The most reliable way to locate a pigeon dealer is to get in contact with other bird dog owners and ask them where they obtained their pigeons. Wild pigeons may also be able to be collected for free by asking local farmers or getting in contact with the state environmental agency.

Instructions

    1

    Contact local farmers. Pigeons often nest in the overhangs in barns. Some areas are accessible with a ladder. Ask the farmer if you can collect the fledglings in the spring before they are old enough to fly away. The farmer will be glad to reduce the number of pests in the barn, and you may get a large supply of pigeons for free.

    2

    Call the state environmental agency, such as the Department of Environmental Conservation, or DEC, in New York. They may have a program that removes pigeons from urban areas and may be willing to offer a batch to you for free.

    3

    Inquire at hunting supply stores. They may know local people who raise pigeons for bird dogs.

    4

    Ask bird dog owners if they trained their dogs with wild pigeons and where they came from. Contacting area bird hunting groups can also be a useful way to network towards finding a pigeon supplier.

    5

    Look online for wild pigeon suppliers in your area. They may have a website or advertise in a classified ads section. You can also post on hunting forums that you are seeking wild pigeons. Another forum member may be able to point you to an area dealer.

Rabu, 26 Oktober 2011

How to Build a Chickadee Birdhouse

Chickadees are small birds that are commonly seen flitting about your backyard. People like attracting chickadees to their homes because in addition to grains and seeds, chickadees enjoy dining on insects. One way to attract chickadees is to build chickadee birdhouses that provide the birds with a safe place they can raise their young. The best thing about birdhouses for Chickadees is that they are an excellent birdhouse for first time birdhouse builder to start on. The design is easy to follow and the construction is basic.

Instructions

How to Build a Chickadee Birdhouse

    1

    Although building a chickadee birdhouse is a relatively simple project, you life will be simpler if you have a birdhouse blueprint you can follow. You can find several free blueprints online. Once you have located a set of blueprints that you like, you will want to print them so that you have a copy with you while you are cutting the pieces of wood for your birdhouse.

    2

    The first piece you are going to cut is going to be used for the birdhouse roof. One half of the roof will measure 6 1/2" x 9 1/4" while the other half should measure 6" x 9 1/4".

    3

    Cut the two sides. These are cut to measure 5" x 6 1/2". Lay the birdhouse sides to one side of your workbench and proceed to cut the floor which should measure 6 1/2" x 6 1/4" in addition to the floor you will need to cut floor rails that measure 6 1/2" x 1/2" x 1/2". Each of these pieces are made out of exterior grade plywood. When you are cutting make sure you use your carpenters square to make sure all of your corners are square. By making sure your corners are perfectly cut, you will guarantee that your birdhouse wont have any gaps.

    4

    Cut the pieces that will make up the front and back of your chickadee birdhouse. Your front should measure 6 x 8 5/8. Once you have the front and back of the birdhouse cut you will need to use your pencil and mark the middle of the top part of the rectangle, this mark will signify were the peak of your roof will peak.

    5

    When you have all of the pieces of your birdhouse measured and cut, you will need to drill a 1 hole in the piece that you are going to use for the front of your birdhouse. This hole is going to be what the chickadees use to enter the birdhouse. Directly underneath the entrance hole you will need to drill another hole that is inch hole. This small hole is where you will secure a perch for the chickadees.

    6

    Now that the cutting and measuring is done, it is time to assemble your chickadee birdhouse. Attach your floor attachment rails to the front and back of your birdhouse. Once you have made sure that the floor rails are flush to the bottom of the pieces you will use your galvanized nails and the waterproof glue to attach them to the plywood.

    7

    Attach the walls of your bird house. After making sure all of the sides are perfectly aligned you will use your waterproof glue to attach the sides to the front and back of the birdhouse.

    8

    Attach the roof of your bird house. First youre going to attach the smaller piece of roof. Use glue to fasten it in place. Next you want to attach the 6 1/2 piece of roofing. This piece will over lap the other half of the roof. The overlap will help prevent rain from getting inside of the birdhouse. Drive a few nails into the roof to help prevent it from blowing off during strong winds.

    9

    Attach the floor once the glue has dried comletely. Turn the birdhouse upside down and use the wood screws to attach the floor to the floor attachments. The reason you want to use the wood screws instead of the waterproof glue because after the baby chickadees move out of the birdhouse you will want to remove the floor so that you can clean the bird house.

    10

    Make a perch under the entrance hole. This will be a place that the chickadees can sit and watch the world pass by. All you have to do is insert the wooden dowel into the hole that you drilled under the entrance hole.

    11

    Your chickadee birdhouse is now complete and ready to be mounted so that a family of chickadees can make it their home.

Selasa, 25 Oktober 2011

How to Build a Nesting Box for Conures

How to Build a Nesting Box for Conures

Conures are easy parrots to breed. Age of sexual maturity depends on the individual species but all conures, when ready to breed, require nesting boxes with suitable nesting material be placed inside the female's cage. The pair will usually use the nesting box as sleeping quarters first. Boxes may be made of either wood or metal but must be deep enough so the birds don't toss all the nesting material out and lay on the bare floor. Once they begin breeding they will generally clutch at least once a year thereafter, with 3 to 8 eggs being the usual. Expect an incubation period of 23 to 28 days.

Instructions

    1

    Cut four pieces of 8-by-18 inch plywood for the sides of the nesting box. Cut an entrance hole 3 or 4 inches in diameter about 4 inches from the bottom of one of the sides. Cut a piece of plywood 8 1/4-by- 8 1/4 inches for the top and cut a 4-inch-diameter observation hole. Cut one piece 8 1/2-by-8 1/2 inches for the bottom.

    2

    Smooth all the rough edges, including the entrance and observation holes, with medium, then fine sandpaper.

    3

    Glue the edges together and secure with finishing nails, hammering one at each corner and one in the middle of each edge. Ensure that the entrance hole is at the lower end, away from the roof with the observation port.

    4

    Set the nesting box aside to dry. Remove the finishing nails when the glue is completely dry.

    5

    Fill the nesting box almost up to the level of the entrance hole with shredded newspaper, non-toxic sawdust, clean straw, or aspen wood shavings.

    6

    Secure the nesting box to the side of the cage. Wrap one length of wire just under the roof, the second above the entrance hole and wrap the third just above the bottom rim. Twist the wires tightly so the nesting box does not move about.

How to Pick a Parrot Cage

Choosing a cage for your parrot is an important decision. Your bird should be able to stretch his wings out completely in any direction in the cage. The bird also needs room to hop around and play freely. Most parrots like to climb around their cages, so it's good to give them plenty of room for that as well. Knowing what kind of cage to buy for your parrot is the first step in ensuring that he will be happy.

Instructions

    1

    Buy your parrot the right sized cage. Smaller-size parrots that will be spending time outside their cage need a cage at least 18 inches in height, length and width. Medium-size parrots need cages at least 24 inches in height, length and width. Larger size parrots need a cage that is at least 30 inches in height, length and width. If you know your parrot will be spending a good amount of time inside his cage, get him a cage with plenty of room.

    2

    Buy your bird a sturdy cage. Most of the larger cages are constructed of stainless steel or iron. Stainless steel is an excellent option because it is strong and easy to clean. Iron cages can rust, so look for one that is coated, which will prevent rust and flaking.

    3

    Choose a cage with properly-spaced and sized bars. The bars on your parrot's cage should not be wider than his head or he could injure himself. The bars also need to be thick. If the bars on your parrot's cage are too thin, he could escape or harm himself while chewing them. The wider apart the bars are, the thicker they should be.

    4

    Buy a cage with no sharp edges. Look in corners and where bars are welded together for jagged areas. In addition, look at any decorations that might be on the cage and make sure that your bird cannot wedge a foot, wing or beak in them. Any decorations should be firmly attached to the cage.

    5

    Choose a cage with a good layout. Think about how the cage will feel to your parrot once the perches, toys, and food containers are in place.

    6

    Buy a cage you can reach inside easily to change food, arrange toys or retrieve your bird.

Jumat, 21 Oktober 2011

How to Combine Two Bird Cages

How to Combine Two Bird Cages

Many bird owners would like to provide their bird with more space than smaller cages allow or might be looking to join the homes of two of their birds. Since larger cages are often very expensive, you might be interested in combining two cages. You can easily do this on your own with some wire cutters and wood paneling.

Instructions

    1

    Place your birds in a cage together and observe if they are able to get along. If they don't, do not combine the cages, as this will cause your birds stress.

    2

    Using wire cutters, cut a square hole large enough for both birds to fit through in one of your cages. (Reference 2) Cut the wire as short as possible and file down the ends with a file so your bird will not be poked by the wire.

    3

    Cut a second hole, exactly the same size and in the same location, in the other cage. File down any sharp ends.

    4

    Line the holes up and attach the cages together using metal clips (Reference 4) or zip ties (Reference 1) For added security, clip together multiple points along the parts of the cage which are touching. (Reference 1)

Selasa, 18 Oktober 2011

How to Make a Breeding Cage for Homing Pigeons

How to Make a Breeding Cage for Homing Pigeons

Breeding cages for pigeons are basic cages with the only purpose being for breeding. They are wooden boxes that have wire mesh walls and a wire mesh door. A simple design for this kind of cage will use a few pieces of lumber and a couple sheets of plywood for the frame and the door. Heavy duty staples are often used for cages like these. They have a strong structural application and will keep the mesh secure for the life of many pigeons.

Instructions

    1

    Position each 30-inch board on end and space them 23 inches apart so they outline the corners of a square. Set one sheet of plywood on top of the four boards so the edges of the plywood are flush with the sides of the boards. Screw eight screws through the plywood so two enter each board. Turn the plywood and the boards over so the boards are standing on the plywood. Screw the last sheet of plywood to these ends of the board just as you did with the first sheet. This is the cage frame.

    2

    Lay two 31-inch boards flat, parallel and 23 inches apart. Lay two 23-inch boards flat between them at right angles so they're 28 inches apart. Lay a sheet of mesh on top of the four boards so the edges are flush. Staple 12 staples over the mesh and into the boards where they meet. These staples will hold the boards and mesh together. Use 12 more stables, three on each side to keep the mesh close to the boards. This is the door to your cage.

    3

    Staple the last three sheets to the cage frame using 24 staples for each side. All of the edges should be flush and you will have one open side that will become the door.

    4

    Screw the two half-hinges to one of the 30-inch boards on the frame. Use the open side that has no mesh. The pin on each hinge should be on the outside edge of the board and each hinge should be 8 inches away from the end of the board. The hinge must be able to open out and away from the cage 270 degrees.

    5

    Screw the other half-hinges to the door so that when the door closes the mesh is on the outside, and all of the edges of the door are flush with the edges of the frame. Use your wire to keep the door tied shut.

Senin, 17 Oktober 2011

The Plans for Building a Quail Pen

The Plans for Building a Quail Pen

Quail can be rewarding to raise but difficult to keep alive. One of the most important aspects of raising quail is constructing a pen that provides a safe environment for them.

Location

    Selecting the right location for a quail pen is crucial. It is important that the location provides shelter, especially from predators and other pets.

Size

    Typically, a quail pen is 6 feet by 6 feet by 18 feet. This can be adjusted to a smaller size if you are not raising many quail and can be made larger if the space is available. Customize the size of the cage to meet your specific needs and fit the location you have selected.

Materials

    The frame for the pen can be made out of basic lumber; 4-by-4-inch posts can be used for the corners, and 2-by-4s can be used to frame out the sides and the door. A set of large hinges, which can be screwed to both the door and the frame with at least six screws--three in each side--should be used. The door and the frame should be covered in hardware cloth, or chicken wire, with squares small enough, usually no larger than half an inch, that the quail cannot escape through them.

Minggu, 16 Oktober 2011

How to Build a Playpen for a Parrot

How to Build a Playpen for a Parrot

Avian pets like parrots can be very rewarding to own and offer great company. Like all animals, though, parrots need somewhere to play. Dogs and cats can be let outside and small rodents have wheels and balls to play in, but parrots require something a little more specialized. Because they can't be let outside, the outside has to be brought indoors for them.

Instructions

    1

    Collect some wood to build the playpen. This can be fiberboard or natural, unsprayed hardwoods. Leaf-bearing trees, such as maple, oak and poplar, are hardwood. Any cone-bearing tree, such as a pine, isn't suitable.

    One thick piece about 2 foot high and 4 inches thick will be required, along with a variety of shorter thinner pieces to act like branches on a tree. A base that's wider than the branches and about 2 inches thick will also be required. Cut to fit, if necessary.

    2

    Sand down all the pieces of wood, if using fiberboard. Remove any rotting or splintered parts from natural wood.

    3

    Drill holes at intervals into the main trunk. These should be a few inches apart and spiral around the trunk. This is so the branches can act like a ladder. The size of the holes depends on the diameter of the branches. Each hole should go 1 inches into the trunk for support.

    4

    Apply a little glue to each hole and the end of each branch and attach to the main trunk. The glue needs to be nontoxic and safe for birds.

    5

    Turn the trunk upside down and place the base on the underside. Attach the base to the trunk by hammering four nails through the bottom of the base and into the trunk.

    6

    Attach toys to the play stand. Feeding and water cups can be attached near the top to encourage the parrot to climb. Attach rings to string and hang from branches. Add knotted pieces of rope to branches, too. Use whatever toys your parrot likes to play with.

Kamis, 13 Oktober 2011

How to Make a Parrot Stand Base

How to Make a Parrot Stand Base

Parrot play stands offer companion birds a place to stretch their wings, exercise their feet and learn basic commands from their handler. There are several types of gyms and stands available, but the most common type associated with basic parrot training is the T-post stand. A base for this type requires just a few inexpensive items purchased from a home and garden center and one or two from any companion bird supply store.

Instructions

    1

    Assemble the plastic Christmas tree stand according to directions.

    2

    Place the tree stand in the center of the plywood board, which acts as a foundation for the tree stand.

    3

    Mark the topside of the tree stand legs at the thinnest part of each leg where the legs lay flush against the plywood.

    4

    Secure the stand onto the plywood foundation, using one screw to each leg of the stand. Apply more screws if necessary.

    5

    Continue to tighten each of the four screws until the screw head is flush against the topside of the tree stand as well as secured at least 3/4 of an inch into the plywood board.

    6

    Place the parrot safe wood T-post base-end down into the tree stand and tightly secure it in place using all four-tree stand key locks.

    7

    Pour the bag of parrot-safe wood pellets into the bowl of the tree stand. This adds weight to stabilize the stand and creates a litter to catch bird droppings, food and seed.

    8

    Ensure the stand will not fall when the bird is playing or stretching its wings before allowing the bird to perch on the T-post.

Sabtu, 08 Oktober 2011

How to Build Bird Houses for Owls

How to Build Bird Houses for Owls

Owls are a mainly nocturnal group of birds that inhabit most of the world. According to the World Owl Trust, there are 216 species of owls worldwide. Most owls do not make their own nests; they prefer to use either existing structures or nests made by other birds or animals. This makes adaptation to man-made bird houses easier. Each species of owls has its own nesting preferences, so each bird house needs to be constructed for a specific owl.

Instructions

Building Instructions

    1

    Lay flat the bottom piece of wood on a flat surface. Run a small strip of wood glue along the backside of the piece. Place the back piece of wood at a 90 degree angle to the first piece. Allow glue to dry. This will serve as the bottom and the back of the owl house. The back piece is slightly higher than the rest of the walls to allow rain to run off and ventilation in the box.

    2

    Screw 2 wood screws into the back and bottom connection from the bottom to secure the pieces together. Lay the birdhouse back down on its bottom with the back piece standing up.

    3

    Run strips of glue along the sides of the bottom piece and up the sides of the back piece. Place the two side pieces along each of the glue strips at 90 degree angles to the bottom piece. Allow glue to dry. These pieces are the sides of the bird house.

    4

    Screw 2 wood screws in along each seam to secure the pieces together. You will need 6 screws total for this step.

    5

    Lay the front piece of wood flat down. Use your ruler to measure and mark the center of the circle and draw a small letter b to mark the bottom of the board. Each owl house will have a different hole diameter and the distance from the bottom of the board to the hole will vary.

    6

    Use your compass to draw the circle on the front piece using the point marked previously as the guide to placement.

    7

    Drill a 3/8-inch hole in the wood just inside of the circle along one side. This will be the entry point for your jigsaw blade.

    8

    Using the circle as a guide cut the circle out of the piece of wood using a hand jig saw. This will be the owl's entrance to the nest.

    9

    Lay the birdhouse down on its back piece with the open front side facing up. Run a strip of wood glue along all three edges of the bottom and sides. Lay the front piece on top of the glue making sure that the letter b that you marked earlier is at the bottom of the bird house. Wait until the glue dries.

    10

    Screw 2 finishing screws into each side of the front piece. You will need 6 screws total to finish this step.

    11

    Set birdhouse on its bottom so you can work on the top piece. This piece will have a hinge so that you can open the box and clean it at the end of the nesting season. Lay the top piece across the top with the extra 1 inch hanging over the front of the box. This overhang will help to keep water out of the nest.

    12

    Place two 3-inch strap hinges at the inside of the back equally spaced so the top can be easily opened. Draw guide holes for each hole on the hinge.

    13

    Drill holes with 5/64-inch drill bit into each of the marked points for the screws. Screw the hinge into place on the back piece of the birdhouse.

    14

    Place the top piece parallel to the back piece and extend the hinges straight up. Mark holes with pencil on top piece.

    15

    Drill holes with 5/64-inch drill bit into each of the marked points for the screws on the top piece. Screw the hinge into place, connecting the top to the rest of the birdhouse.

    16

    Drill a starter hole on the edge of the top piece in the center and one on the front piece to attach the safety gate hook. Screw the hook into the holes. This will keep animals from getting into the box.

    17

    Drill 8 holes in the bottom of the birdhouse with a 3/8-inch bit to allow any water that might get into the house to drain out.

    18

    Install the birdhouse and wait for owls to take up residence.

    19

Minggu, 02 Oktober 2011

Bird Cages That Are Cat Proof

Bird Cages That Are Cat Proof

To maintain the safety of your pet bird, be mindful of the hunter instinct of the domestic house cat. Cats think of birds as prey to devour or at least objects to play with and tease. Sometimes a cat and bird living in the same household can be friends, or at least live peacefully together, but it takes a lot of training and persuasion. Don't rely on their compatibility when it comes to the welfare of your bird. Take precautions from the start regarding the safe housing of your feathered friend. Bird cages must be sturdy and cat proof when a cat and a bird are in the same residence.

The Hunting Instinct of the Domestic Cat

    Cats have an innate instinct to chase birds.
    Cats have an innate instinct to chase birds.

    Remember that your sweet ball of fluff is actually a predator with razor-sharp claws, strong pointed teeth, keen senses of smell and hearing and sharp eyesight. Cats can leap vertically and pounce horizontally a distance of about six times their body length. They can also run in short sprints up to 30 mph. (See Reference 4)

    Your cat is not intentionally being cruel when it chases or swipes at your bird. It is a cat's instinct to hunt birds and other small animals. Most domesticated cats no longer intentionally kill to eat, as they are now usually well fed by their owners. They simply enjoy the chase and have an innate drive to run after any small object that moves fast.

Safe Bird Cages Made of Wood

    The bars of wooden bird cages must be thick and smooth.
    The bars of wooden bird cages must be thick and smooth.

    Many wooden bird cages sold in pet stores are not safe. These cages often have bars spaced too far apart so a cat's paw, or even a bird's head, can fit through. Carefully select a cage that has bars properly spaced and smoothly sanded to prevent it from harming your bird. The bars should also be thick enough so that large-beaked birds such as cockatiels and parrots cannot bite through them. If you are making a cage yourself, choose hardwood so the bird can't gnaw pieces out of it. Secure the main door with a padlock, as birds are adept at using beaks to pry or push a latch open. Ensure the food and water dish openings and pull-out bottom trays are cat proof. Place the cage high on a table away from any object a cat can climb on to get to it. Have the cage fit the table so the cat can't jump up beside the cage. Choose a cage large and heavy enough so the cat can't knock it off the table if it lunges at the cage.

Safe Bird Cages Made of Metal

    Metal bird cages should not contain zinc.
    Metal bird cages should not contain zinc.

    When using a metal cage, follow the same precautions as for a wooden one. Additionally, make certain all joints are securely and smoothly welded so your bird won't be scratched by them and they won't give way with a flying leap from your cat. The bars must be thick enough so a strong-beaked bird can't pry them apart. Don't purchase a bird cage that contains zinc, as it is poisonous to birds. A metal cage may be light enough to hang from the ceiling on a very sturdy and tightly fastened hook. Remember the extreme measures a cat will go to and the extensive mental and physical assets it can call upon to reach the bird.

Attempting To Have Your Cat and Bird Get Along

    Never leave cat and bird alone together in the same room.
    Never leave cat and bird alone together in the same room.

    If you are attempting to train a cat and bird to co-exist, do so when both animals are very young. Do not expect to bring an adult cat into your home and have it become buddies with your bird. Female cats are more prolific hunters, so get a male if you are going to have both a cat and a bird. Peaceful coexistence may be possible at times between your two pets. Cats are very independent and need calm, positive reinforcement instruction. With patient training a young cat can learn that any aggressive action toward the bird won't be tolerated. However, natural instinct can take over in times of mental or physical stress. It is very possible that a bird, especially a larger one, will tease and persecute your cat. "Tweety and Sylvester" scenarios often happen in real life. The irritated cat will frequently retaliate and the bird will be no match for its size, weight and weapons. Never leave a cat and bird in the same room when you are not at home. Having a safe bird cage gives added insurance for a peaceful home for you and your pets.