Jumat, 30 September 2011

How to Make a Stone Resin Bird Bath

How to Make a Stone Resin Bird Bath

Birdbaths are classic garden accessories and essential tools for attracting birds to your backyard. While many styles are commercially available, a natural rock birdbath lends an appealingly rustic look. Unfortunately, rock is heavy, expensive and often difficult to find in the proper shape.

Stone resin or fake rock birdbaths, like those made of hypertufa, are convenient substitutes. Hypertufa is an inexpensive mix of natural material and concrete that is both lightweight and durable and its mottled texture convincingly resembles natural limestone. Hypertufa birdbaths are easy to make and just as attractive as natural stone and the birds won't be able to tell the difference.

Instructions

    1

    Make the hypertufa. Combine equal parts Quikrete, sphagnum moss and vermiculite (enough to cover the outside of your mold) in the large bucket, then add enough water to make a liquid with the consistence of thick pancake batter. Stir thoroughly.

    2

    Spread a thick layer of hypertufa on the outside of the birdbath mold.

    3

    Quickly invert the mold and cover the bottom with hypertufa.

    4

    Let the hypertufa dry for several hours.

    5

    Make a new, small batch of hypertufa to patch any exposed areas of the plastic mold. Turn the mold right side up and dab hypertufa on the lip of the mold to hide it completely.

    6

    Allow the birdbath to dry completely over several days.

    7

    Place the birdbath in an area of your backyard with trees and shrubbery to provide cover for birds.

Kamis, 29 September 2011

How to Build a Parrot Perch

How to Build a Parrot Perch

Parrots need perches that resemble their natural tree branch habitat to keep them mentally and physically healthy. Parrots will exercise by climbing all over perches, especially natural wood perches. Many varied perches will stimulate a bird to climb and move around, and natural wood perches with different textures will exercise the birds feet by give him plenty of things to grasp onto. Perches are easy to make with a bolt, wing nut and washer and a hand drill.

Instructions

    1

    Disinfect the wood in a sink or basin full of warm water and a cap of bleach. Allow the wood to air dry completely with no scent of bleach left behind. Rinse the branch if any bleach smell remains.

    2

    Measure the inside of the cage and cut the wood branch or dowel so that it can fit inside the cage. Do not cut the branch so long that it make break under the weight of the parrot, or use a thicker branch.

    3

    Measure the distance between cage bars and buy a stainless-steel bolt that will fit between the bars, and a wash and wing nut that are larger than the distance between bars.

    4

    Drill a hole in one end of the perch, with a hand drill and drill bit the same width as the bolt, that is deep enough to fit half the bolt. Use a long bolt for a large perch and a smaller bolt for a small perch.

    5

    Twist the bolt into the bolt and put the washer onto the bolt and flat against wood branch. Put the perch inside of the cage and stick the remaining end of the bolt through the cage bars, then tighten the wing nut so the perch cannot move.

    6

    Wash the perch regularly with water and bleach to remove feces and insert a different perch in the cage until the one being washed is dry. Replace perches that have been chewed and ruined.

Homemade Concrete Bird Perch

Homemade Concrete Bird Perch

It can be expensive to own a bird, but not everything has to cost so much. While you may not be able to cut costs in areas like veterinary bills, food or cages, you can save some money by making your own concrete perches. Perches make your birds cage life more enjoyable, and they can benefit your bird by trimming their nails also.

Getting Started

    Before you begin making a concrete perch, decide how many you want to put in the cage. Keep in mind that perches may need to be thrown away at some point, so consider making a few extra. Next, take a look at some perches in your local pet store to get an idea of what size will fit your species of bird.

Materials to purchase

    One of the key materials, besides cement, is PVC tubing. This will be the mold for the perch, so get tubing with the diameter you determined earlier. You will also need a 2-inch lag screw, one wing nut (that fits the screw) and two washers for each perch you make. The washers should have a larger diameter than the PVC tubing youre using, and the diameter should be larger than the width of the cages wires.

    You should also have something to cut the PVC tubing (like a saw), wire cutters or strong scissors, tape (duct tape or masking tape), a jar or can in which to dry the molds, sandpaper and one bag each of all-purpose sand and cement.

Preparing the mold

    Cut the PVC tubing into pieces so that you wind up with a number of perch molds--however many you determined you want to make. Take each piece and use scissors to cut down through its length. You are making a long seam so you can open the mold when the time comes. Tape the end of the tube and the seam.

Making the perch

    Next, make the cement mixture using a three to one ratio--sand to cement. Stir in water until the mixture isnt lumpy and is easy to pour. Pour the mixture into each mold. Make sure the mold is in the container where it will eventually dry, open side up. Fill it to the top, even allowing some overflow.

    Assemble a lag screw with a washer and wing nut. Put the assembly into the open end of the mold with the screw enters the cement mixture, the washer covers the opening and the wing nut is on top. And now youre almost done.

    Let the molds dry for days. When completed, peel open the tubing after removing the tape and push out the dry perch. Sand it some so the bird will have some traction, and screw it into your cage.

Considerations

    Concrete perches can be a problem for your pet birds, even though they help their nails. Concrete is not warm or smooth, and this can cause your birds feet to become stiff and uncomfortable. Its a good idea to offer other perching surfaces for variety, and monitor how long your bird sits on them. Birds often like to perch on the highest spot in the cage, so dont put the concrete one too high. You may also need to remove the perch from time to time.

Rabu, 28 September 2011

DIY: Styrofoam Incubator

DIY: Styrofoam Incubator

Keeping bird eggs for hatching can sometimes be a difficult process, especially in the absence of a hen to keep the eggs warm as they develop. This eggs can be incubated, however, in a homemade incubator from a Styrofoam cooler. Making an incubator out of the Styrofoam cooler helps keeps the eggs warm allowing them develop and hatch. Transforming the cooler into an incubator is a simple process and involves utilizing a few pieces of equipment to create the correct environment for the eggs.

Making an Incubator from a Styrofoam Cooler

    Use a large Styrofoam cooler. Begin by placing a light socket on the lid of the cooler and tracing the socket with a pen. Using a sharp knife cut out the circle and place the light in the hole. Be sure to purchase a light socket that also comes with a cord, because it will be necessary to plug in the light to provide a heat source for the incubator.
    Next, take a piece of 8 inch by 10 inch glass from a picture frame and place it against one side of the incubator. Cut a hole that is just slightly smaller than the piece of glass and secure the glass to the cooler using carpenters glue. This will give the incubator a viewing window to keep an eye on the incubating eggs without having to disturb them.
    On the side opposite the glass piece, poke several holes into the Styrofoam. This allows proper ventilation into the incubator and helps keeps the eggs healthy as they develop. Before placing eggs into the incubator it is important to take a few steps to ensure the birds are able to grow in their eggs and hatch. Placing a small fan into the cooler helps circulate the warm air from the light and helps even the temperature. Additionally, adding a bowl of water provides necessary humidity for the eggs. Finally, heat the incubator with a 15 to 25 watt bulb and monitor the temperature closely by placing a thermometer inside the Styrofoam cooler.
    The light keeps the interior warm, mimicking the feeling of a mother hen sitting on her eggs. Maintaining proper humidity and keeping the temperature even keeps the eggs development steady and helps improve their chances of developing into a hatched chick.

How to Make Large Parrot Toys

How to Make Large Parrot Toys

Parrots need toys to avoid becoming bored, consequently encountering behavior problems. The birds do have a tendency to quickly destroy toys, however, despite the high price of some of the larger toys. Bird owners can make a large custom stringed ball for their parrot, which is inexpensive and includes the bird's favorite playthings. Owners can also make large hanging sticks to entertain their pets. These toys, which will be destroyed eventually, are made differently every time to include variety for the bird.

Instructions

Waffle Balls

    1

    Watch your bird to discover what toys are favored. Some birds adore hard plastic chew sticks while others favor bells or noisy toys.

    2

    Collect materials to recreate your bird's favorite toys and activities. Materials for a large parrot toy include items such as rope, waffle balls, bells, hard plastic rings and beads, and strips of leather.

    3

    Tie a knot in a length of rope or strip of leather and add a bell, hard plastic ring or bead that will spin freely. Lace the rope or strip through the waffle ball to the other side and add another bell, bead or ring to the opposite side. Tie the opposite end tightly.

    4

    Repeat steps 1 through 3 for the rest of the ball holes. Add the new ball, full of the parrot's favorite toys, to a bird toy box that should be already filled with small plastic bird toys.

Hanging Sticks

    5

    Create a second large toy for your parrot with sticks of wood, which will accompany the ball in the parrot toy box. When the parrot destroys older toys, attach the pieces to this toy to make it larger and keep it interesting.

    6

    Tie rope to one end of the stick. Attach this rope to a wall or side of the bird's cage. Tie sections of rope down the stick length. Make them long enough to attach various toys and toy pieces.

    7

    Attach bells, beads, tubes or other favored toys to the ropes along the stick length. Choose toys your parrot will be excited to see. As toys break off or as other toys are chewed to pieces, attach new pieces to the ropes. The length of both the stick and the ropes is adjustable to your available space and size of the bird.

Homemade Things for Chickens

Homemade Things for Chickens

You believe wholeheartedly in sustainability. In fact, you believe in it so much that you've started raising a flock of chickens in your backyard. Sure, your neighbors might be disturbed by the clucks and b'gawks they hear coming from over the fence, but you aren't particularly fond of their pit bulls, either. You have the chickens, that's step one. But what do they need or want, and what can you make for them yourself?

Chicken Coop

    While you might be content to let your chickens free range around the backyard, they need a place to roost. The coop will provide shelter, a place to keep their food and water, and a nest in which they can lay their eggs. With scrap lumber and a roll of chicken wire, you can build a chicken coop yourself. Of course, if you've always wished every day was Easter, don't build a coop. You'll have eggs hidden in every nook and cranny in the yard in no time.

Incubator

    If you want to raise your own chickens from eggs, build your own incubator. You can make a heated enclosure for hatching your own chicks using scrap materials that you have around the house. With a source of electricity, a container, a thermometer, an old lamp, some lightbulbs, and a few odds and ends, you can make a working incubator and watch the miracle of chicken birth.

Chicken Diapers

    While it sounds gross, chicken diapers are the answer to the barrage of guck that constantly exits out of the backside of your chickens. Put a diaper on your chicken, and watch a barnyard staple turn into a house pet. You can pay top dollar for designer chicken diapers, or you can make your own with your sewing scraps.

Chicken Feed

    Once the coop is established, the largest expense in maintaining a flock of chickens is the food. You'll find that the ravenous birds go through as much feed as you toss them, and even then they spend all day pecking and scratching the dirt in search of more. With the one-time expense of a grinding mill, you can grind home-grown grains into chicken feed. Or if you lack the space, purchase whole grains and grind them at home.

How to Make a Homemade Finch Aviary

Homemade aviaries provide a safe, attractive environment to house your birds for hours of viewing enjoyment. The beauty of designing your own is that you can make it to match your decor tastes as well as make it most convenient for your uses. Aviaries can be built any size and shape as long as they can be easily cleaned and house a sufficient amount of perches as well as food and water bowls. Keep the safety of the birds in mind as many birds get injured trying to escape aviaries.

Instructions

Build a Finch Aviary

    1

    Decide on the size and design of your aviary. Depending on your space, this may vary from 4 feet to 8 feet tall and 2 feet to 6 feet wide.

    2

    Cut galvanized wire mesh to the desired size and fasten together to form a sturdy enclosure or attach to a wooden frame for a more attractive aviary. Leave room for doors and windows where food bowls can be inserted and a space for a pull-out tray in the bottom.

    3

    Attach wire mesh to the frame (optional) with a staple gun or use the wire mesh to cover the top of the aviary if not attached to a wooden frame.

    4

    Add a door and small windows for easy access to food and water dishes. Screen doors and windows are easy to purchase and install.

    5

    Add a pullout tray to the bottom if you choose. If the aviary is walk-in, this is not necessary.

    6

    Add perches and non-toxic plants to your aviary to make it more comfortable and inviting for your birds.

    7

    Add full-spectrum florescent lighting or a string of outdoor lights to enhance your aviary and the quality of life for your birds.

Selasa, 27 September 2011

How to Build a Cardinal House

How to Build a Cardinal House

Arguably the most recognizable backyard bird in eastern North America, the bright red Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) is a regular visitor to city parks, suburbs, forests, swamps, and brushy meadows. With the males' striking color (females are a reddish-brown), appealing crest, and thick seed-busting bill, cardinals will readily eat at feeders set near low, dense cover. Cardinals do not nest in traditional, closed-wall birdhouses; they prefer to build nests out of sticks, grass, and bark on a branch or in the crook of a tree. Birders can encourage cardinals to build nests by offering homemade nest baskets in trees next to dense shrubbery or bushes.

Instructions

    1

    Cut the hardware cloth square into a circle (lay a large dinner plate over the mesh to use as a guide).

    2

    Cut out a narrow pie-shaped piece from the circle with the point of the "pie" at the center of the circle.

    3

    Bend the circular mesh into a wide cone by joining the two sides of the cut-out piece.

    4

    Staple the two sides together with the heavy-duty stapler.

    5

    Locate a suitable place for the nesting basket. The fork of a small tree or shrub between one and 15 feet off the ground is ideal. Make sure there is plenty of dense shrubbery and groundcover nearby.

    6

    Staple the nest basket into the fork of the tree.

How to Make Your Own Cockatoo Toys

How to Make Your Own Cockatoo Toys

Cockatoos are very curious and need to be stimulated. One way to stimulate your bird is to introduce it to new toys. Cockatoos will play with just about anything, from PEZ containers to cardboard; however, more complex cockatoo toys are very easy to make. After you become familiar with the different materials that cockatoos enjoy playing with, you will be able to get creative and craft different kinds of toys for your pet.

Instructions

    1

    Tie one end of a shoelace very tightly to one metal ring. Tie a knot in the shoelace beneath the metal ring.

    2

    Slide three plastic beads onto the shoe lace beneath the knot. Slide one wooden bead underneath the plastic beads, and then slide three more plastic beads underneath the wooden bead. Tie a knot.

    3

    Puncture a hole into the center of the side of the cardboard toilet paper roll with the pen, pencil or screwdriver. Push all the way through to the other side.

    4

    Push the shoe lace through one of the holes. String some plastic beads onto the shoelace inside the toilet paper roll. Thread the shoelace through to the other side of it. Tie a knot underneath the roll.

    5

    Add three more plastic beads, one wooden bead, and then three more plastic beads to the string. Tie a knot below the beads.

    6

    Push the cockatoo treats into the holes in the waffle ball. Break down the treats as necessary to get them to fit. It is fine if the pieces are able to fall out, since they will fall into the cage for the bird to eat.

    7

    String the shoe lace through both sides of the Wiffle ball. Tie a knot underneath.

    8

    Repeat Steps 2 through 5 to mirror the top half of the cockatoo toy. Tie a very tight knot at the bottom.

    9

    Attach the end of the shoelace to the second metal ring. Fasten the rings onto the bars of the cage in whatever position you would like. If you are using keychain rings, slide the bar of the cage into the gap and rotate, just as you would attach the rings to a key. If you are using binder clips, open them and then clamp the rings around the bars of the cage just like you would fasten them around loose leaf paper.

Jumat, 23 September 2011

How to Build a Double-Breeder Canary Cage

How to Build a Double-Breeder Canary Cage

There is often a high mark-up on birdcages, and building your own can safe money as well as give you a sense of satisfaction that buying one can't.

Instructions

    1

    Create the back panel.
    On the 8' x 4' sheet of plywood mark out 48inches x 18.5 inches. Use a saw to cut this out.

    2

    Create the top and bottom panels from the plywood.
    These should be 47 inches by 15 inches.

    3

    Create the side panels from the plywood.
    Mark and cut out 15" x 18.5".

    4

    Create the support strip.
    Out of your 8' x 4' sheet of plywood mark out and cut a strip (47" x 1"). This will be used to support the bottom part of the cage fronts.

    5

    Position the the two cage fronts loosely in position on the sides of the cage frame. You should have a half inch gap between the cage fronts. This is where the sliding divider part will go.

    You should also have a gap between the bottom of the cage fronts and the bottom of the cage frame. The 47"x1" support strip that you just made should be positioned flush with the bottom of the cage fronts. Nail this strip in position and then bond with Gripfill.

    6

    Create the center support and secure the channeling for the center divider.

    The top of this support needs to be flush with the top edge of the strip of (47" x 1") you have just installed.

    Measure from base of the cage to the top edge of the strip and cut a piece of plywood 15" x your measurement. Be sure to notch it at 1/2 inch by 1 inch to accommodate for the support strip.

    Secure the channeling in the middle of the cage frame. Make sure that the top is directly over the bottom or the divider will be crooked!

    7

    Create the partition. Commercial birdcages use cage panels, and some DIY cage plans call for plywood or metal.

    If you cannot find an additional 15x15 cage front and still want the divider so that your birds can see eachother, cut a panel of zinc mesh this size. It is important to remove the sharp metal corners and to scrub the zinc off!

    8

    Prepare the frame for the cage fronts:
    On the roof of the cage frame, glue 1/2x1/2 blocks of wood so that the cage panels don't fall in.
    Screw the picture clips onto the top of the cage and the 47x1 inch strip which is across the bottom.

    Make sure that they are screwed tight enough that your birds normal movements won't make the cage fronts fall off!

    9
    After installing the poop tray, the cage should be ready for your canarys!

    Make the removable bottom/poop trays.

    These should slide in at the bottom, under the support strip.

    As with the divider, many DIY instructions call for wooden trays, but commercially made finch breeder cages use metal or plastic. If you can find a 15x24 cookie sheet for each side, this is ideal.

    Make sure that the gap between the tray and support strip is not more than 1/2 inch!

Kamis, 22 September 2011

How to Make a Cover for a Parakeet Cage

You love your little parakeet, and your pet is fun to watch, but come nighttime, the show is over and your bird will want to sleep without an audience. A parakeet cage cover will serve this purpose well. In addition, it will keep your fine-feathered friend warm and safe from drafts. You can purchase a parakeet cage cover, or you can make one. If you prefer the latter, let the steps below show you how to do it.

Instructions

    1

    Take tape measure and measure from one end of the parakeet cage to the other end, going over the top of the cage with the tape measure. Write down the measurement (for example: 45 inches).

    2

    Lay the quilted fabric face down on the table and using your pen, draw a vertical straight line 45-inches long. Measure 22 -inches from the center of the line, horizontally, and mark the distance with the pen on the wrong side of the fabric.

    3

    Draw a semi-circle, starting at one end of the 45-inch line, connecting it at the 22- inch marked point, and continuing to the other end of the 45-inch line.

    4

    Cut the semi-circle out, following the line drawn.

    5

    Using the bottom of a coffee mug to measure with, draw a small semi-circle at the center of the straight edge of the large semi-circle, on the wrong side of the fabric, and cut it out.

    6

    Take your two large semi-circles and face the right side together. Pin along the straight edge, up to the small semi-circle. (Note that half of the straight edge will remain open).

    7

    Sew -inch in from the edge of the pinned fabric.

    8

    Pin trimming along edge of small semi-circle.

    9

    Sew trimming in place.

    10

    Turn fabric under -inch along both open straight edges and then sew close to the edge.

    11

    Pin lace ruffling to bottom of parakeet cage cover.

    12

    Sew lace ruffling in place.

    13

    Sew Velcro to the open edges of the parakeet cage cover, positioning one of the sets of Velcro at the top of the open straight edge, and the other set halfway down the open straight edge.

    14

    Drape the parakeet cage cover over the cage, and hold in place by sticking the Velcro together to keep the cover closed.

Senin, 19 September 2011

Supplies for Banding Finches

Supplies for Banding Finches

Breeders often band birds to keep track of blood lines and to identify birds they have sold. Banding can also be done to quickly identify a bird's gender. The supplies required for banding finches are very simple; the type of supplies needed depends on what type of band is being used.

Closed Metal Bands

    There are no special tools required for closed metal bands. The bands simply slip on to a baby bird's leg by passing over the still-soft ankle joint.

Open Plastic Bands

    Open bands are made of colored plastic and come with a small tool that looks a bit like a tube with a slice missing out of it. The trough is thinner at the end and gets wider toward the bottom. When you slip the band onto the thin end and slide it down to the thicker bottom, it forces the band open. The finch's leg fits inside the trough, and once you slide the tool off, the band will close around the leg.

Homemade Bands

    Dr. Geoffrey Hill, a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Auburn University, published a study entitled "An Inexpensive Source of Colored Leg Bands," in which he describes making homemade leg bands from craft beads by splitting the plastic beads with a razor. The split beads require the same trough tool as open plastic leg bands.

Minggu, 18 September 2011

How to Make a Pigeon Incubator

How to Make a Pigeon Incubator

Breeding pigeons is a hobby growing in popularity. Breeders find great enjoyment in watching eggs develop into tiny chicks. But hatching pigeon eggs requires a specific environment to ensure proper embryo development. While commercially built incubators are available, they can be cost prohibitive, but hobby breeders can easily build their own incubators out of materials found around the house at a fraction of the cost.

Instructions

    1

    Cut two small flaps in the box, measuring about 2 square inches. If you are using a plywood box, cut two removable 2-square inch squares. Close the flaps or replace the squares. Opening flaps or squares are useful in maintaining temperature and ventilation.

    2

    Place the box under a lamp with an adjustable height. Fill a pie tin with warm water and place it at the bottom of the box. Pigeon eggs require a high level of humidity in their incubator so that the chicks will not stick to the inside of the egg shell. Refill the pan each day.

    3

    Place a thermometer in the center of the box. The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign recommends maintaining the temperature between 99 and 103 degrees Fahrenheit. Set the empty egg carton in the center of the box, close to the thermometer.

Sabtu, 17 September 2011

Homemade Chicken Nest

Chickens made great backyard pets, and it is always a pleasure to have farm-fresh eggs. Nesting boxes for your small flock can be made out of simple wooden boxes, milk crates, large PVC piping, or many other materials. In general, you'll want to provide at least one nesting box for every three hens. Chickens prefer to lay their eggs two to three feet off the ground, in an area where they can sit comfortably and safely with a roof over their heads. The nest box should be filled with clean, safe nesting material.

Build Your Own

    You can easily build your own, multi-unit nesting box units out of old dressers, rabbit hutches or bookshelves. Nesting box units can be made of wood, plywood, or metal. In general, you will want to divide the units into 12- to 16-inch wide boxes. The hen should be able to stand up in the nesting box without bumping her head. The top roof should be slanted to keep birds from roosting (and pooping) on top of the unit. Nest boxes should be lower than roosting perches, or the birds may decide to use the boxes for sleeping instead of laying eggs.

Reused Material

    A milk crate turned sideways and fastened to the wall two feet above the ground makes a perfect nest box for chickens. You can also use buckets, barrels, plastic tubs, or anything clean that was never used to hold chemicals. As long as it is sturdy and safe for your birds, you can try it out as a nest box. Different birds will have different preferences as to where they want to lay eggs. Some prefer cave-like enclosures, while others want a spacious loft.

Nesting Matrial

    Fill your nest boxes with nesting material. Be generous--let the material pile up two to four inches in each box. This will help prevent your eggs from getting cracked accidentally. The material will need to be changed out weekly. Straw or hay is one popular choice of nesting material, but you can also use shredded newspaper or wood chips.

How Do You Make a Hummingbird Feeder Drinking Bottle?

How Do You Make a Hummingbird Feeder Drinking Bottle?

Hummingbirds can be fascinating birds to watch, but you have to have something in your yard to attract them. Although certain plants can bring hummingbirds around to feed, you can also use a hummingbird feeder. Feeders can be purchased at your local garden supply store, but they can be expensive. If you prefer, you can make your own. By using recycled materials found around your home, you can easily make a hummingbird feeder that will attract the birds and cost little to no money.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the label from an individual-serving sports drink bottle. Remove the lid and thoroughly clean the inside of the bottle with soap and water.

    2

    Use sandpaper to scuff the outside of the bottle. This will make painting easier later on. Set the bottle aside.

    3

    Remove and clean the lid from a small mayonnaise jar using soap and water. Make sure the lid you choose is plastic. If you do not have a mayonnaise jar around, you can use any plastic lid that is slightly larger and deeper than your sports drink bottle lid.

    4

    Use an electric drill to a create a circle of 9 holes in the center of your bottle's lid. Use your drill or a pair of pliers to carefully turn the little holes into one large hole.

    5

    Fill the mayonnaise lid with about a half-inch of water. Float the sports drink bottle lid on the water. You want it to be almost parallel with the lip of the larger lid. Adjust the water level as needed. This will act as a spacer to keep the smaller lid off the bottom of the larger lid. If you are having trouble getting your lid to float, you can press a paper napkin through the hole and use that as a spacer instead of the water.

    6

    Use a hot glue gun to attach the two lids together. The easiest way to do this is to build up four mounds of glue around the smaller lid that reach to the sides of the larger lid. Do not fully enclose the sides or your hummingbirds will not be able to drink. Allow the glue to dry and discard the water.

    7

    Make sure your sports drink bottle lid is still above the bottom of your mayonnaise jar lid. If not, remove the glue and repeat steps 5 and 6. Also ensure the glue is still snugly attaching the two lids to one another. Add additional glue as necessary.

    8

    Use a drill to make a small hole in the center bottom of your sports drink bottle. Insert an eye screw through this hole. Make sure the seal is tight. If not, add some hot glue around it to seal it up.

    9

    Paint the entire bottle a solid color using spray paint. The color choice is up to you, and feel free to add stripes or other details to the bottle.

    10

    Use your hot glue gun to attach silk or fabric flowers around the mayonnaise jar lid on the feeder. Use red flowers since it is the preferred color for hummingbirds. Make sure the flowers do not dip inside the lid, otherwise when you add liquid the dye in the flowers could bleed into the water.

    11

    Fill your bottle with hummingbird food, which can be purchased at your local garden supply store. Replace the lid and turn the bottle upside down.

    12

    Attach a string or wire through the eye hook and hang your feeder from a tree.

Jumat, 16 September 2011

How to Use Nontoxic Paints on Bird Cages

How to Use Nontoxic Paints on Bird Cages

Because pet birds use their beaks to play and climb inside their cages, the finish of your bird's cage will chip at some point in your bird's life. Choosing the right paint is important since your pet will be placing its mouth on the paint and your bird may ingest some if the paint chips. When refinishing your bird's cage, look for a paint that says it is nursery safe. These paints are water-based with low volatile organic compounds making them safer for birds than traditional paint. To make the paint last as long as possible, apply it correctly.

Instructions

    1

    Move your bird, its toys and its food into an alternative cage. The painting process takes at least 48 hours and your bird should not be exposed to the fumes and dust during this project.

    2

    Move the cage to be painted to a well-ventilated area. Put on the dust mask. Sand the areas of the cage you want to paint.

    3

    Vacuum up as much of the dust produced from the sanding. Wipe down the cage with a rag dampened with the white vinegar.

    4

    Shake the paint can well or open the can and stir the paint to mix it thoroughly. Apply the paint with the brush. Allow the paint to dry.

    5

    Apply a second coat if any areas appear thinly covered. Allow the paint to dry for 48 hours before placing your bird in the newly painted cage.

Homemade Acrylic Aviary

Homemade Acrylic Aviary

As a bird owner, you probably want to provide a safe environment for your birds but also want its environment to complement their home dcor. Building an indoor aviary is the perfect solution. An acrylic aviary not only provides safety for the birds and other pets outside the aviary, but it helps lower the sound effects created by large birds.

Size

    An aviary gives your bird the illusion of being free but keeps it safe in a virtually indestructible environment. You'll need to build an aviary large enough to provide plenty of space for your bird. The width of an aviary should be at least two times the wingspan of the bird. The height should be 4 to 6 times the length of the bird. For example, an aviary that measures 4- to-8-feet-wide and 8-feet-tall will house 20 parakeets, two cockatiels or one Amazon parrot.

Location

    Like most bird owners, you want your birds to be with and be part of the family. Acrylic aviaries are either portable or secured to the interior or exterior structure of the home. An outdoor acrylic aviary protects birds from the weather, yet provides your birds with a sense of being out in the open where they live in nature. With indoor aviaries, acrylic provides a backdrop for attaching posters of outdoor scenery that complements your home dcor as well as gives your birds a sense of being outdoors.

Materials

    Large birds are extremely destructive and can severely damage people and property. Acrylic sheets used in the making of an aviary helps reduce damaging events caused by birds. Birds are also very messy with their food. An acrylic aviary prevents seeds from leaving the area, keeping your home clean. A wire floor a few inches above the acrylic bottom of the aviary catches seeds and droppings. Don't forget that the area should have good ventilation, which may mean installing a fan in the roof portion of the aviary or making one of the sides of the aviary out of strong wire.

Construction Tips

    Although sheets of acrylic are expensive, you save a lot of money when framing. Acrylic does not need framing; the panels you cut attach to each other using metal hinges or brackets and screws. When cutting acrylic, clamp a straightedge at both ends and scribe a break line at least half way through the acrylic to avoid uneven breakage. Predrill holes slowly while holding the drill at a 90-degree angle.

Selasa, 13 September 2011

How to Build a Wooden Bird Aviary

How to Build a Wooden Bird Aviary

Birds are happiest when they can flap and flutter freely within their living quarters. They love mirrors, hanging bead toys, natural branch perches, bells, cuttle bones and swings. Building a wooden aviary is a challenge, but you will be able to customize your bird's environment to ensure his health, safety and happiness. This aviary uses plywood and 1/2 inch metal mesh, and provides your bird with 6 feet by 4 feet of flight space. By making the aviary bottomless, and adding a door and a solid top, you will be able to use it indoors or outside, and be able to clean it easily.

Instructions

    1

    Lay plywood sheets flat across saw horses one at a time. Draw a rectangle 3 feet by 6 feet, 6 inches from the top and side edges of each of three plywood sheets. Drill a hole at each corner of the rectangle using a 1/2-inch drill bit. Use a jig saw or circular saw to cut out the three rectangles. Save them for other projects.

    2

    Affix the metal mesh to the plywood using carpenter's staples and a hammer to make screened windows in each of the three cut plywood sheets.

    3

    Cut a door 6 feet by 3 feet in the fourth plywood sheet. Be sure to leave 2 feet uncut at the top of the door to help prevent your birds escaping every time you open your aviary. Attach the door handle, hook and eye latch and hinges. One hinge should be 6 inches from the top of your door, and one should be 6 inches from the bottom. Be sure the spine of the hinge aligns properly between the door and frame. See the Resources section at the end of this article for advice on choosing and installing the correct hinge.

    4

    Attach plywood sheets using L-shaped 2-inch wall mounts and 1/2-inch wood screws, mounted inside the aviary. Stand the aviary upright. Attach the aviary top using eight 2-inch long wood screws, one in each corner of the top and one across from each other at the center point of the four sides.

    5

    Use the 1/8-inch drill bit to make four pilot holes on the right and left sides of the aviary, two holes across from each other about 2 feet from the top, and two holes across from each other about 4 feet from the top. Attach 1-inch diameter dowel rods or natural branches using 1-inch wood screws. These will be your perches.

    6

    Clip water dishes, feeders, cuttle bones and mirrors onto mesh at the front and sides of cage as desired. Place the aviary in a desired location. Place the birds in their current cage, with the door open, inside the aviary. Allow your birds time to accustom themselves to their new found freedom. Eventually, they will use their cage as a nesting or sleeping box and spend most of their time playing with the toys or flying in the cage. This cage will accommodate a pair of large birds, two or three pairs of medium sized birds, or six to 10 smaller birds.

The Best Way to Arrange Perches in a Parakeet Cage

The Best Way to Arrange Perches in a Parakeet Cage

Parakeets, also known as budgies, make great pets. You will be amazed at their intelligence as some parakeets can be taught to speak and have a vocabulary of more than 100 words. Parakeets are also active and need exercise regularly. If you are unable to let your parakeet out of his cage often, perches will help give your parakeet a workout.

Arranging Perches

    Perches should be arranged in several areas throughout the cage that allow your parakeet to hop easily from one perch to another. Perch hopping is a great form of exercise for your parakeet. A concrete, or mineral, perch should be placed in an area where your parakeet likes to do his grooming. It is a good idea to place perches at different levels of the cage; however, be sure they are not directly over the food and water dishes.

    Make sure to arrange the perches in a way that does not inhibit your parakeets movement or cause damage to his feathers as he moves around inside the cage. Another important thing to remember is that the perches should be placed in a way so your parakeet's tail does not touch the side of the cage when he is sitting on it.

Types of Perches

    There are different types of perches, and each type has a specific benefit to your parakeet. You can make a perch yourself using untreated cotton rope, but keep an eye on it to make sure your parakeet doesnt eat strings from the rope and that he doesnt get a claw caught in a frayed area.

    Your parakeets cage might come with basic wooden dowels to use as perches, but natural tree branches are actually better for your bird. The uneven shape of the branches means your parakeet will not always be putting pressure on the same part of his foot.

    You can use the branches from most fruit and nut trees such as magnolia, dogwood, ash and elm. Cut the branches to fit inside the cage, and always inspect the tree branch for insect egg pods before cleaning them by scrubbing with detergent, rinsing and then drying in the sun. According to Peteducation.com, heating natural branches in an oven at 200 degrees for 45 minutes to kill any insects is recommended.

    One of the most important perches to have in your parakeets cage is a mineral perch. Usually made of concrete, the mineral perch gives your parakeet a place to groom his nails and beak. If you are unable to have all these types of perches in your parakeets cage, it is acceptable to use the wooden dowel type perches, but be sure to pick up a mineral perch as well.

Minggu, 11 September 2011

Build it Yourself: Large Bird Cages

Large bird cages allow you to keep several birds in a single cage, house big birds, and give your birds room to fly. Although pet and bird stores often sell large cages and aviaries, you can build a large cage yourself. Building the cage will save you money, and allow you to construct it to the exact size that will best benefit your birds while fitting in your home.

Materials

    The two main elements of a large bird cage are the frame and the screen. Smaller bird cages can use thin wire metal frames, but to construct a large bird cage use a larger and sturdier material such as wood or PVC. PVC is often easier to work with because connection pieces can be used instead of nailing every joint. The downside to PVC is that the finished cage will not be as aesthetically pleasing. If you care about the appearance of the cage, wood is the best choice. For the screen, you can use either a mesh material or metal fencing with small holes. Make sure that the material you use for the frame is strong enough to prevent the birds from escaping, and that the holes are too small for a bird to fit through.

    You will also need nails or screws to construct the frame and fasten the screen to the frame, and hinges to create doors to the cage. In addition, you may wish to purchase or find materials to place inside the cage to make the environment more enjoyable to your birds. These materials could include branches and stones.

Construction

    Before beginning construction, find an area in your home that would be suitable for the bird cage. Take measurements of the space that you have available so that you will be sure your finished cage will not be too large.

    The frame of the cage can be constructed in any shape that will be convenient for your space. A simple box will work fine. If you plan to place the cage against a wall, consider attaching the frame to the wall itself. This will decrease the construction time, but will make it impossible to move the cage later. After finishing the frame, use the screen to create the walls of the cage. Make sure to space the nails attaching the screen closely together, so that your birds will not be able to escape through the edges of the screen.

    You will need to create at least one door for the cage so that you can feed the birds and remove them from the cage. Cut a hole in the screen bordering the frame which is large enough for your bird to move through. Then create a square wooden door frame, and attach the removed portion of screen to the door. Use hinges to attach the door to the frame.

Use of Rustoleum on Birdcages

Use of Rustoleum on Birdcages

Rustoleum is a brand name of a product that claims to stop rust from traveling throughout the entire surface of the metal it protects. Unfortunately, this product is harmful to humans and fatal to pets in any amount of contact (breathing, touching, or chewing) because of the toxic chemicals that constitute it. In short, this product is not safe to use on any birdcage (indoor or outdoor).

Warning

    Birds are particularly susceptible to toxins that may not be harmful to humans. As a result, birds should not be exposed to chemicals of any kind. Rustoleum contains acetone, liquid petroleum gas and titanium dioxide, along with several other chemicals that will kill any bird that inhales the fumes or ingests residue. Daily exposure or overexposure to Rustoleum will also cause cancer; therefore, no birdcage should ever be treated with this product or any product like it. The Material Safety Data Sheet on Rustoleum states that the Environmental Protection Agency has labeled this product as being an immediate health hazard, a chronic health hazard and a fire hazard.

Quality Verses Price

    High-quality birdcages should not rust, and if they are rusting, they should quickly be replaced because rust is toxic to birds as well. Quality bird cages are not cheap (even if they are small). Low quality birdcages that are made from zinc and other metals (and alloys) are fatal to all birds. Almost all birds will explore their surroundings by climbing around on the inside of the cage, so even if the bird is a songbird that does not have the chewing habits of a parrot, they are still at risk for ingesting the dried chemicals that are left behind to "protect" the metal.

Safe Cage Materials

    While there are many different styles (dome top, flat top, square, or round) the construction of a bird's cage is most important. When selecting a birdcage, the quality of the metal, bar spacing and size should be considered before style and color. All birdcages should be purchased from quality sellers or constructed from untreated, nongalvanized stainless steel. The bar spacing should be narrow enough to prevent the bird from poking its head out to prevent broken necks and injury. The larger the cage the better; smaller cages do not offer birds ample space to perform their natural instances of stretching, climbing, foraging and sleeping. At a minimum, a bird's cage should allow the bird to open his wings completely and turn around without touching the sides of the cage.

Other Types of Common Household Hazards

    Along with Rustoleum, there are several household chemicals that are fatal to all birds. Other types of chemical hazards that are toxic to birds include floor cleaners, anything that contains propellant as well as paint, hairspray, perfume and candle fumes. Cleaners such as ammonia, bleach, deodorized sprays and air fresheners contain chemicals that will quickly shut down the respiratory system of the healthiest bird. Cookware and kitchenware coated with Teflon or advertise that they are nonstick produce chemicals that will also collapse a bird's respiratory systems. Never use these chemicals near birds because these fumes are fatal to birds even in small amounts.

How to Create a Bird Bath For Little or No Cost

How to Create a Bird Bath For Little or No Cost

Not only people and pets look to water for relief from hot summer days; birds do too. Help out your feathered friends by placing a bird bath in your yard. You don't have to spend a fortune; anything around your home that will hold an inch or two of water will do just fine.

Instructions

    1

    Fill a ceramic or glass pie plate with 1 - 2 inches of water and place it on a tree stump or pedestal. It may take awhile for the birds to know there is a cool bath in your yard, but once they have discovered it, they will be repeat customers.

    2
    garbage can bird bath

    Turn a used aluminum garbage can upside down. The lid will hold the water for the bird bath. Cut an opening in the center of the bottom (which is now the top) of the can which will allow the lid's handle to fit securely. Again - no more than 2 inches of water in the bird bath; more than that, birds won't use it. You can really "cute" it up by painting the can with birds wearing bikinis or holding umbrellas.

    3

    Look at garage sales for doll sized plastic swimming pools; these make cute, cheap bird baths. You may even find one with a slide and diving board:)

How to Buy a Chicken Incubator

How to Buy a Chicken Incubator

Chicken incubators are readily available from online sources, farm supply stores and commercial hatcheries. You can chose an incubator that automatically turns the eggs, or one where the eggs can be turned by hand. They come small enough to hatch three eggs for the classroom experience or cabinet units that will hatch over 2,000 eggs. Expense depends on how many chicks you want to hatch.

Instructions

    1

    Purchase an egg tray to accommodate specific sizes of eggs. Will you be hatching bantam, quail, large hen, duck or goose? Each will require a different size cradle cup. Decide how large an incubator you will need by determining how many eggs you will hatch. Be aware that different species, for instance chickens and geese, will require different incubation periods and heat adjustment. Read the instructions before setting the eggs.

    2

    Start the automatic turner in two to three days according the incubator instructions. If you prefer to hand turn the eggs, the same instructions apply. Hand turning requires you to be present two times a day, morning and evening, to physically turn the egg over like the hen would do in her nest. Leaving them stationary will cause a malformed chicken or death to the embryo.

    3

    Test the warning buzzer on fully automatic incubators. This buzzer reminds you when to open the air ventilators. Familiarize yourself with the countdown read out to hatching day. If this is not automatic, place a calendar near the incubator so you can keep track of when to open air vents and stop turning eggs. Incubators can be fully automatic and can adjust temperature and moisture content while some require that you add water when the levels are too low and manually adjust temperature. Be sure and read the instruction manual to find out what the incubator does on its own and what is required of you.

Jumat, 09 September 2011

How to Make a Climbing Grid Out of Rope for Large Parrots

How to Make a Climbing Grid Out of Rope for Large Parrots

Birds of all sizes like to climb. Rope climbing grids help your large parrot feel like it is exploring its natural environment in the jungle. Such a grid can also give your parrot something to play with, allowing it to create its own games with the gird. Pet and bird supply stores carry climbing grids in different sizes and shapes; however, these can be expensive. You can easily make your own at home for little money and little effort.

Instructions

    1

    Measure the space you will be setting up your completed climbing grid using a measuring tape. Add 4 to 8 inches to the total measurement. This will determine the size you want the grid to be.

    2

    Choose a rope that is at least 1 inch thick. Sisal rope is the best rope to use; however, you can also use cotton, untreated rope. It is safe for your parrot if it gets in its mouth and will not unravel and tangle its feet. The amount of rope you need depends on the size of the space where you will be suspending your grid.

    3

    Cut four lengths of rope to match measurements you took in Step 1. These four pieces will be the edges of your grid. Place these pieces on your work surface to create the outline of your grid, making sure the ends of the ropes overlap at the corners, so that the ends stick out between 4 to 8 inches. The exact length of overlap depends on the size of the grid. These loose ends will be used to attach the grid to the space.

    4

    Tie the corners of the grid together using a square knot. You can use another knotting technique, such as a rolling hitch, but you want to avoid anything that will slip.

    5

    Cut the remaining ropes into lengths that will fit within the outline of the grid. Ensure each rope has an additional 4 to 8 inches to the length to allow for tying. The number of ropes you will need depends on the size of your grid. The actual squares inside the finished grid should be 7 inches by 7 inches, so you will place a rope every 7 inches on the grid.

    6

    Place the ropes onto the grid to check placement. Do not place them closer than 7 inches. Otherwise, your parrot may become stuck and entangled in the final product.

    7

    Use the knotting method you used in Step 4 to tie the ropes together at every intersection and at the edges.

    8

    Use scissors to trim away any excess rope from Step 7. Also trim away any loose threads from the rope that may be sticking out.

    9

    Attach four quick links to the four lengths you left in Step 3. To do this, tie a knot in the ends of the ropes and then attach the quick links to it. Quick links are metal hooks, similar to a carabineer; except they have a screw closure instead of a spring-loaded one.

    10

    Install four large eye hooks into the space you intend to hang your finished grid spaced out the size of your grid. Hook the quick links through the eye hooks to hang your grid.

Selasa, 06 September 2011

How to Sew Snuggle Huts for Birds

Snuggle huts are made from comfortable fabrics such as terrycloth, minky or fleece. They resemble a tent and are stabilized to hold your bird's weight. Birds, particularly parrots, love them. A snuggle hut provides security for your bird by acting as a hideout from the outside world. When a bird enters a snuggle hut, it is typically because it wants some alone time. A snuggle hut can be made at home with minimal supplies.

Instructions

    1

    Using a measuring tape to guide yourself, cut the two fabric pieces into six equal rectangular pieces. Cut the canvas into three equal rectangular pieces. You should use as much of the fabric as you can so that the end result is large enough for your bird.

    2

    Sandwich the canvas between two pieces of fabric so that you have three individual three-layer pieces of fabric. The right sides of the fabric pieces should be facing out with the canvas between them. Make sure no canvas peeks through and that all three layers are straight. Pin in place using straight pins

    3

    Set up your sewing machine for a tacking or basting stitch. Sew around the edges of each three-layer piece starting 1/4 inch away from the raw edge. Pull the pins out of the fabric as you sew. You should still have have three three-layer pieces of fabric.

    4

    Stack two of the pieces together. Sew the left sides together using a straight stitch, starting 1/4 inch away from the raw edge. Pull up the top fabric layer and then line up the final fabric piece's left side edge with the bottom fabric piece's unattached edge. Sew the sides together using a straight stitch starting 1/4 inch from the raw edge.

    5

    Pull up the two loose edges of the fabric. Line the edges up so you have a shape that resembles a triangle. Fold each piece of ribbon in half to make a loop. Tuck each folded ribbon between the fabric pieces that form the top of the triangle about 2 inches from each edge. The loops should extend to the outside of the hut because you will attach clamps to the loops to hang inside your bird's cage. Pin the ribbons in place with straight pins, and sew a straight stitch 1/4 inch away from the raw edge all the way across the top of the tent and through the ribbon ends. Pull the straight pins out as you sew. Attach the stainless steel bird toy clamps to each of the loops.

Minggu, 04 September 2011

How to Build a Cockatiel Play Gym

How to Build a Cockatiel Play Gym

The cockatiel is a popular pet in the United States. With an average size of 12 to 14 inches long, the cockatiel is usually a gray and white bird with a yellow head and peach-colored cheeks. They like to whistle more than talk, but you can train cockatiels to do a variety of sounds. Cockatiels enjoy social interaction and grow attached to their keepers. Cockatiel play gyms include a variety of toys depending on the personality of your pet. Along with plenty of fresh veggies and fruits in the cage, you can build a play gym with a T-stand and various toys from the pet store.

Instructions

    1

    Buy a large T-stand at a pet supply store. The T-stand should be a perch stand with a thick dowel base and a horizontal dowel at the top.

    2

    Wrap leather string around vertical dowel, crisscrossing with rawhide until tight and secure to the dowel.

    3

    Drill a hole into the horizontal wooden dowel on one end. Buy a bird-safe rope that measures the height of your T-stand to 3 inches from the ground. Push one end of the rope through the hole and make a knot larger than the drilled hole.

    4

    Cut bamboo sticks the height of your cage, about 3 feet. Then cut about two dozen smaller lengths to make the ladder rungs, about 3 inches in width. Use a non-toxic glue and a hot glue gun to attach the rungs to the longer bamboo sticks. Place the ladder so that it sits near the opposite end of the T-stand from the rope. Attach the ladder to the cage's bars with raffia string. Additionally, slip beads onto the ladder rungs before attaching them with glue to give your bird something else to play with.

    5

    Drill more holes into the T-stand and mount other toys like hanging bells, mirrors, rainmakers and other treats. Place a small wooden basket in the corner of the gym to store additional toys. See Resources for multiple links to bird toys and other play gym ideas.

    6

    Cover the bottom of the cage with newspaper to catch droppings.

Sabtu, 03 September 2011

DIY Chicken Pens

DIY Chicken Pens

Keeping backyard chickens, either primarily as pets or for their eggs, is a way to enjoy farming on a very small scale. Unfortunately, humans are not the only animals that like eating chickens. Completely free-range chickens are at risk from foxes, weasels, birds of prey, coyotes and even domestic dogs and cats. In some places, there are restrictions on free-range livestock, and, of course, your neighbors might not appreciate your chickens scratching about in their gardens. You need a chicken pen to protect your chickens and stop them from wandering off. They'll also need a coop to roost in. You can build a simple, secure chicken pen over one weekend. Whether you also build the coop or buy one ready-made is up to you.

Instructions

    1

    Buy or make the chicken coop first, as you need to know how big the coop is when measuring for your pen.

    2

    Measure the length and breadth of your planned pen and the height of the coop. Add at least 6 inches to the height of the coop.

    3

    Buy enough wire mesh to cover these measurements, with a bit extra if possible. For example, if you want to construct a 10-foot by 5-foot pen that is 3 feet high, you'll need at least 30 feet of 3-foot-wide mesh (2x5 + 2x10). You will also need a roof, so buy at least 10 feet of 5-foot-wide mesh.

    4

    Measure off the first side and bend the mesh accordingly with the pliers. Repeat for each side until you have a rectangle.

    5

    Fix the open ends together by weaving the wire through them using the pliers.

    6

    Attach the roof in the same way.

    7

    Place the pen over the chicken coop and secure it in the ground by hammering in the tent pegs.

    8

    Make a door at the back that is big enough to access the coop through. Cut away a square of mesh to create the door. Attach the door back at the top with another piece of wire and temporarily secure it closed with string.

    9

    Bend all sharp ends of wire and mesh out of the way with the pliers so neither you nor the chickens get scratched later.

Jumat, 02 September 2011

How to Build a Bird Perch Stand

How to Build a Bird Perch Stand

All birds require a perch to sit on, replicating how they would act in the wild. Perches can be found in elaborate designs, making them look more like trees, but these can be costly. A less-expensive alternative can be made at home using plastic piping, which is just as effective for birds of any size.

Instructions

    1

    Cut the 1-inch-diameter PVC piping into four 10-inch sections, two 20-inch sections and two 40-inch sections. The 1/2-inch-diameter PVC pipe should be 20 inches long.

    2

    Slot two of the 10-inch sections into a T-connector so the remaining opening of the connector faces up. Repeat for the other 10-inch sections and T-connector. You will have with two 20-inch-long parts, each connected by a T-connector.

    3

    Attach the two 20-inch sections to the parts made in Step 2, using 1-inch elbow connectors. This should leave a square, which is used as the base of the perch.

    4

    Fit the two 40-inch sections into the opening of the T-connectors, so they rise vertically from the base. Fit a 1-inch to 1/2-inch connector to the top of each vertical section.

    5

    Attach the 1/2-inch-diameter pipe across the top, between the connectors, to make the perch.

    6

    Secure the pipes into the connectors using duct tape or an animal safe glue.