Kamis, 30 Juni 2011

What Are Basic Needs to Own a Parakeet?

What Are Basic Needs to Own a Parakeet?

Parakeets are popular and sought after companion birds in the United States. These attractive little birds are hardy and playful and with patience, can be taught to speak. Although parakeets can be housed in large outdoor aviaries, most enthusiasts prefer to keep their birds indoors, where they can enjoy the parakeet's company and train it easier.

Cage

    The cage for your parakeet should be as spacious as possible. A cage that is 16-by 16-by-16 inches should be considered the minimum size for a single parakeet, the size of a budgie. Parakeets do not typically fly upward, so long and wide cages are preferred over tall ones, provided the bird's head does not touch the top of the cage. The parakeet's tail should also not touch the cage floor. These active little birds enjoy climbing and horizontal bars are preferable to vertical ones. Bars should also not be spaced more than -inch apart, or the parakeet may get its head stuck. Cages must not be made of zinc, which is toxic to birds, particularly to parakeets, which sometimes bite the bars of their cage. Gates that open sideways are better than guillotine gates, as these may injure the parakeet.

Cage Furniture

    Food and water dishes must always be available and kept clean. Parakeets enjoy bathing and should be provided with a bath bowl. These inquisitive members of the parrot family readily play with toys and are fascinated by their own image in a mirror. A metal bird's mirror and assorted toys are always welcome in the parakeet's cage. The parakeet should be offered at least two perches placed at opposite ends of the cage. Grit-covered paper sheets can be placed on the bottom of the cage. These commercially available cage liners keep the parakeet's nails short, as the bird walks on them. They are easily removed and disposed of when the cage floor becomes too dirty.

Diet

    Parakeets require a high-quality budgie seed mix as their staple diet. This seed mix must be supplemented daily with vegetables and fruit. Parakeets enjoy a wide variety of both fruit and vegetables, but avocado pear is highly toxic to them. It is important to provide the parakeet with a mineral block, both to keep its beak in trim and to provide trace elements. Parakeets will also enjoy nibbling on cuttlebone and will readily accept grit when it is offered. Grit helps to mechanically break down seeds and is required for optimal digestion in parrots and their relatives. Parakeets must always be provided with clean and cool drinking water and a liquid, avian multivitamin can be added to this drinking water.

Wing, Beak and Nail Trimming

    The wings of parakeets are trimmed to prevent them from escaping, once they have been allowed out of their cage for exercise. Wing trimming will also help during training, as the parakeet is less independent and more focused on the owner and its lessons. Parakeets may need both their nails and beak to be trimmed periodically. Many owners are capable of cutting their bird's nails, but a parakeet's beak should be trimmed by a veterinarian.

Rabu, 29 Juni 2011

How to Sanitize a Bird Play Gym

How to Sanitize a Bird Play Gym

It's important to sanitize your bird's cage, toys and play areas on a regular basis. Failure to keep these areas sanitized can have a negative effect on the overall health of your bird, and possibly even the other inhabitants of the home. While smaller daily cleanups can be done with regular soap and hot water, experts recommend that you thoroughly sanitize your bird's play gym at least once a month with a nontoxic disinfectant. It may even be necessary to do this on a weekly basis if you have a larger bird or a bird that tends to make more of a mess.

Instructions

    1

    Mix 1/8 cup bleach with 1 quart of water in a 40-oz. spray bottle. If you don't have an empty 40-oz. spray bottle handy, you can also mix this mixture in a large bowl or other container, and pour it into a few smaller spray bottles.

    2

    Fill your bathtub with hot water and allow the play gym to soak for about 5 minutes.

    3

    Drain the water out of the tub.

    4

    Apply 2 to 3 drops of dish soap to your scrub brush and scrub down the entire gym along with any debris sticking to it. If you have a large play gym, you may periodically have to add a few more drops of dish soap to your brush.

    5

    Rinse off the entire gym with clean water.

    6

    Spray down the entire gym with the bleach-and-water solution you made. You'll want to thoroughly coat everything and let it sit for approximately 5 to 10 minutes.

    7

    Rinse off the entire gym again with clean water.

    8

    Dry the gym with some paper towels, or allow it to dry naturally in the air, preferably in the sun, before allowing your bird to use it again.

The Best Way to Arrange a Parakeet Cage

Budgies, more commonly known as parakeets, make great pets. These birds are very intelligent and lots of fun, but they can be messy too! It is very important to get a cage that is the appropriate size for your parakeet to enjoy playing in as well as eating and grooming. A cage that is too small or not arranged properly results in a poor environment for your bird.

Cage Placement

    First pick a spot for the cage. Place the cage so your parakeet perches close to your chest level. Lower than that will make your parakeet feel anxious and vulnerable. Don't place the cage on the floor for this reason. Being up higher means "superior" to birds. In the wild, dominant birds perch on higher branches; so, it is not recommended to place the cage up higher than your chest level.

Arranging Cage Supplies

    There are various ways you can set up your parakeet's cage, but setting up special areas within the cage is the best way to ensure your parakeet's happiness. First make sure there are perches placed throughout the cage. One should be near the food and water dishes, one by the toys and one in an area where the parakeet can groom itself.

    Food and water dishes should be near the door area of the cage so you can easily access them on a daily basis. It is best to have the type of food and water dishes that attach to the side of the cage for your parakeet to perch on while eating and drinking.

    Toys need to be put where the parakeet can easily access them. A good place for toys is at the end of perches. Spread out the toys so your parakeet will get much-needed exercise going from perch to perch to check out the different items.

    The grooming area of the cage should have a concrete or mineral perch for your parakeet to groom his beak and nails. You can also place a small mirror on the side of the cage in that area.

Tips

    Make sure you have a wide variety of toys for your parakeet. Boredom can lead to behavioral problems as well as health problems. It may take a while to find the toys your parakeet will absolutely love, but once you find them, you will have a very happy bird in the fun and safe environment you've provided.

Kamis, 23 Juni 2011

How to Make a PVC Bird Perch

How to Make a PVC Bird Perch

PVC bird perches are inexpensive to make and require a nominal amount of time to finish. Do-it-yourself bird enthusiasts enjoy creating perches out of PVC in different circumferences to accommodate several birds in one cage. Birds prefer to sleep on a horizontal perch but also enjoy slanting perches to exercise and climb in different directions.

Instructions

    1

    Measure the area with a measuring tape from each side of the cage where the perch will install. Add one inch to the measurement.

    2

    Cut a piece of PVC pipe to the measurement size including the extra inch. Use a hacksaw to cut the pipe. Saw on one side about half way through the PVC then roll it over and saw through the second side until it is completely cut through.

    3

    Sand the ends of the PVC with medium grit to remove any burrs caused by the hacksaw.

    4

    Mark a dot with a marker on one end of the perch 1/2 inch from the end. Mark a dot on the same end of the perch on the bottom of the PVC 180 degrees around the pipe. Draw a circle around the circumference of the pipe to connect the two dots. Repeat this process on the other end of the perch.

    5

    Cut a deep "V" shape into the top and bottom of the PVC pipe that ends at the circle. This will make two pointed areas with a space in between them that is shaped like a traditional wooden perch. Repeat this process on the other end of the perch.

    6

    Drill a hole in each of the two tips of the perch on each end with a 1/4-inch drill bit. Place the holes directly in line with each other on each end so that one is above the other at the same position.

    7

    Sand the entire perch with medium grit sandpaper so that it is roughed up and easy for the birds to grip.

    8

    Place the perch into the cage with the opening on each end above and below a horizontal bar of the cage.

    9

    Cut a 6 inch length of baling wire and insert it through the two holes on one end of the perch that protrudes 1/2 inch on the outside of the cage. Feed one end of the baling wire through both holes and twist tightly together with hands. Repeat for the other end of the perch.

How to Use a Bird Incubator

Using an incubator is the most effective way to hatch birds that do not have a mother. Incubators are boxes with soft heat lamps pointing down to a nest area that create the perfect environment for chicks and other baby birds to develop in their eggs. Incubators come in different sizes for different uses, but all work on the same principles. In the incubator, the eggs will have to be turned to keep their core temperature even.

Instructions

    1

    Store freshly laid fertile eggs in a cool damp place while setting up the incubator. Do not allow eggs to become frozen. Set up the incubator in a temperate room that generally stays around 60 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit.

    2

    Make sure the fine wire netting of the incubator is on the bottom. Ensure the walls are sturdy and not loose. Tighten any screws with a screwdriver if the incubator is not stable. Set the lamp on the top of the incubator and plug it in.

    3

    Place the thermostat in the incubator in the middle of a wall. Turn the dial of the lamp to 100 degrees. Wait for the incubator to warm, and adjust the heat dial higher and lower until the thermostat consistently reads 100.5 degrees.

    4

    Place the eggs gently inside the incubator onto the wire netting, with the smallest side of the egg facing slightly down (the fine wire netting will keep them in place). Mark a calendar for 21 days from the start of incubation as this is when the hatching will begin.

    5

    Turn the eggs three times a day to keep them evenly warm. Place both hands in the incubator and gently pick up the egg to turn. Place the egg in a palm and slowly rotate it until the bottom is the warmest area. Place the egg back down, smallest side facing slightly down.

How to Buy a Bird Atrium

How to Buy a Bird Atrium

Now that you've added fine-feathered friends to your family, you need to find the perfect home for your birds. Atriums come in all shapes and sizes and are lovely additions to all-season porches and solariums. Here's what you need to know to make the right choices.

Instructions

    1

    Buy the biggest and best quality atrium you can for your birds. Select an atrium that is wide and tall enough for your birds to stretch their wings and fly around. Ideally the atrium should be tall enough for you to walk through as well.

    2

    Look for solid construction, especially for your larger birds. Larger structures (which are 6 feet by 8 feet and bigger) usually consist of a frame made of wood or PVC pipe over which mesh or a fine gauge screen is attached. This gives birds exposure to fresh air and sunlight. If your atrium is large enough for you to enter, get a double door to prevent escapes. After entering the first door and closing it, you open a second one to enter the aviary. Also, access doors for nest boxes and feeding dishes make maintenance easier.

    3

    Look for an atrium that will blend in with the surrounding environment. Plants make natural perches that emulate a bird's wild environment. Trees make beautiful and practical focal points as well. Large terracotta plant saucers are great for food, water and bathing.

Selasa, 21 Juni 2011

How to Use a Bird Harness

Placing a bird harness over your pet will allow it to fly. In fact, bird-supply outlet Parrot University states that flying improves the intelligence, visual acuity and health of parrots. Flying is "fundamental to every component of a parrot's mind and body," they say. But the bird harness isn't only designed for parrots; other birds can use it and you can be more confident that your animal won't fly away. Getting your bird adjusted to the harness can be challenging.

Instructions

    1

    Slide the middle of the harness slowly over the bird's head. Some birds will be extremely resistant, but if your bird is familiar with you and you have had it for a pet since it was very young, then the bird should cooperate. Try not to push the bird off-balance as you adjust the harness or your bird could become extremely resistant. Hold food through the head of the harness to get the bird to poke its head through the first loop.

    2

    Lift the left wing slowly through the side loop, then lift the right wing slowly through the other side loop. Reward your parent through each phase of fitting it to the harness. You can give it a treat or a rub on the head if it likes to be touched.

    3

    Adjust the strap on the harness by gently sliding the fabric up the buckle. Make sure you don't adjust it so tight as to render your bird uncomfortable and unable fly. You should be able to slip your index finger between the bird and the belt.

    4

    Tie the end of the harness to an object or hold on to it. The harness will act as a leash, keeping your bird from flying away. Tie the leash to a rope to give your bird more flying freedom.

Minggu, 19 Juni 2011

How to Build an Outdoor Bird Aviary

How to Build an Outdoor Bird Aviary

Keeping birds as pets, especially indoors, can be a messy affair. Issues of cleanliness result from molting and the need for waste removal. Daily upkeep is necessary to keep food and water containers, perches and the cage itself clean. A solution is to build your own outdoor aviary.



The type and number of birds you are housing will dictate the size of your aviary. An average outdoor aviary size is 8 feet tall, 8 feet long and 4 feet wide. You can alter these measurements to meet the needs of your specific birds, but you will need to have a size and design in mind before purchasing your supplies.

Instructions

How to Build an Outdoor Bird Aviary

    1
    Wooden board
    Wooden board

    Construct a frame with two inch by four inch wooden boards. Set the boards on their edges in a rectangular form and secure the corners with nails -- at least two at each of the four corners. Separate a large, rectangular frame into two squares if you are building a hefty-sized outdoor aviary.

    2
    Man pouring concrete
    Man pouring concrete

    Fill the frame with wet concrete, at least 12 inches think and level. This will serve as the base for the bird aviary and it will be easy to clean after it hardens. Remove the boards after the concrete has set firmly but do not wait until it is 100 percent dry. The boards will be difficult to remove if they are allowed to firmly secure themselves to the dry base.

    3

    Sink at least four untreated wooden posts, measuring four inches by four inches, into the wet concrete at the four corners. Sink another post close enough to one of the corner posts in order to attach a door. Measure your gate or door beforehand to guarantee that you space the posts correctly.

    Brace each post by loosely nailing two inch by four inch boards at an angle reaching from half way up the pole to the ground. Remove the boards when the concrete hardens around the poles and they can stand on their own.

    4
    Gate
    Gate

    Attach a gate between the pre-positioned poles with hinges and screws. Either purchase a pre-made gate or construct a simple wooden one with two inch by four inch boards. Do so by lying the boards on a flat surface so their edges are flush. Nail additional planks down the row of boards to hold them together.

    5
    Staple gun
    Staple gun

    Unroll and attach galvanized wire mesh around the four walls and across the top of the outdoor bird aviary. Use galvanized staples and a staple gun to fasten them to the posts. Ensure the mesh will be flush with the top of the door when it is closed. If this poses a problem, add a two inch by four inch plank across the top of the two posts serving as the door frame.

    6

    Protect your birds from rain by securing a corrugated plastic sheet over at least 1/3 of the aviary's top. This is best accomplished on an end, not across the middle, of the aviary. Fasten the wooden posts at two corners Allow a couple inches of plastic to overhang each edge, and consider bending the edge that runs across the middle of the aviary upward. This will keep rain from running down into the bird cage.

    7
    Birds in cage
    Birds in cage

    Secure perches inside the bird aviary. A basic way to accomplish this is to run an untreated wooden pole across the width of the cage and connect it to two parallel posts. At an angle, drill pilot holes through the ends of the pole and into the posts. Make sure your screw is long enough to reach through the pole and deep into the post. Secure it tightly.

Sabtu, 18 Juni 2011

What Do You Need in a Parakeet's Cage?

Parakeets are lively, curious, affectionate pets. These brightly colored birds can be taught to talk and perform tricks that will keep you amused for hours. Parakeets are not difficult to care for, but they do have a few special requirements. Purchase the largest cage you can afford in order to provide room for your pet to fly around, and then learn about the items you will need in your parakeet's cage.

Toys

    Toys will provide the mental stimulation your parakeet needs. Be prepared to provide new toys on a regular basis, as these intelligent birds soon get bored with the old ones. This need not be an expensive proposition; some objects found around the house can be used for toys, such as toilet paper rolls, bits of thick rope or a string of plastic beads. You can purchase bird gyms, mirrors, bells, rings and many other colorful, shiny toys your parakeet will enjoy.

Perches

    Provide a variety of perches for your parakeet. Variety will provide mental and physical stimulation for your pet. Choose wooden, plastic, rope or concrete perches, as well as swings and ladders made especially for parakeets. You can place a natural branch in your parakeet's cage---just be sure to use a nonpoisonous wood such as willow, poplar or a branch from a fruit tree. Place the perches at varying heights and distances, and place one diagonally in the corner. Be sure that at least one of the perches provides access to the food and water bowls.

Food and Water

    Provide clean water daily, either in an open bowl or water bottle designed to hang in a bird's cage. Offer water for bathing at least twice a week by placing a shallow pan of water in the bottom of the parakeet's cage. Place high-quality bird pellet food in the cage along with fresh foods such as bean sprouts, broccoli, mangoes, green peppers, peanuts and dandelions, but be careful---some human foods such as avocados and grapefruits are poisonous to parakeets. Millet, oats and dry greens also make healthy additions to a parakeet's diet.

Cuttlebone and Mineral Block

    Cuttlebones and mineral blocks are available at pet stores. They provide important minerals, including calcium, that are essential for parakeet health. They also provide a way for parakeets to trim and sharpen their beaks and claws.

Newspaper

    Use newspaper to line the bottom of the parakeet's cage. If you place several layers together at a time, you can quickly remove the top layer each day, giving your bird a clean space. Remove all the newspapers each week and wash out the cage thoroughly.

Senin, 13 Juni 2011

About Parakeet Bird Cages

About Parakeet Bird Cages

Although parakeets enjoy perching on their owner's shoulder, the sociable birds require a secure enclosure to call home. A parakeet's cage provides safety from other pets, young children and household hazards, according to veterinarian Louise Bauck of the Hagen Avicultural Research Institute. Consider cage size, materials and features when selecting a parakeet cage.

Size

    The recommended cage size for one parakeet is a 16-inch cube. For a pair, upgrade to a 20-inch cube. When housing several parakeets together, increase the cage size by four cubic inches for each bird added. When in doubt, The Humane Society for Seattle and King County (Washington) recommends purchasing the largest cage that fits the budget and space in the home.

    A cube-shaped cage is not necessary, but choosing a cage with an equivalent amount of space is important. Parakeets fly forward, rather than vertical. The small parrots prefer a cage with a width greater than the height.

    Cages with bars spaced no more than 1/4-inch apart reduce chances of strangulation of parakeets. The small parrots enjoy climbing. To satisfy this desire, choose a cage with horizontal bars on the largest walls.

Features

    Parakeet cages come with a variety of opening features including doors and pop-up tops. Cages with guillotine-style doors pose safety hazards for parakeets. Cages with book-style doors will not accidentally fall, trapping the bird underneath. Parakeet cages with a top that opens allows curious parrots to explore outside the cage while staying close to food and water sources. Before placing the parakeet in the cage test each opening for a secure, snug closure.

Materials

    House parakeets in non-toxic stainless steel cages. Avoid cages with bars made of zinc, lead or plastic, as these can poison a parakeet if chewed and ingested.

    Accessorize the cage with perches, swings and toys made of natural elements. Choose pesticide-free branches from fruit trees, unvarnished wood and plain rawhide-based toys. Finish accessorizing the cage with durable ceramic or stainless steel food and water bowls.

Transitions

    Parakeets take time to transition to a new cage. Set up the cage before bringing home a new bird. During the first two days in the new cage, the bird assimilates to new owners, a new environment, new smells and the new cage. The Bark Rescue in Belleville, Illinois recommends placing a new caged parakeet in a well-lit room with lots of human activity. Talk to the bird through the cage wires with a soothing voice for the first few days. Allow the pet to learn the layout of his cage and feel secure. Cover the cage in the evening to promote restful sleep. After his first week in the new cage, allow the parakeet to come out daily for supervised socialization and exercise.

Maintenance

    A parakeet cage requires routine cleaning. Each day sanitize, dry and refill the water and food dishes. Once every two weeks remove the bedding from the cage floor. Then, scrub the floor to remove dried feces and old bird food. Parakeets will eat fallen seed from the cage floor if the seed is accessible. Keeping the floor clean keeps birds healthy. Wash additional cage accessories including perches, toys and treat cups every two weeks.

Sabtu, 11 Juni 2011

How to Make a Bird Aviary from PVC Pipe

How to Make a Bird Aviary from PVC Pipe

Bird aviaries are a type of bird cage that can be used outdoors to keep many types of birds. This type of bird cage is large enough to walk into and can have perches or ledges for the birds to sit on. In order to build this type of structure you will need to first determine where it will be located and how big it will be. You will then need to obtain the tools needed to build the aviary from materials which include PVC pipe.

Instructions

    1

    Apply PVC cement to the ends of two 3-foot pieces of PVC pipe. Place a T-fitting in between the two 3-foot pieces of PVC pipe. Repeat this step with another T-fitting.

    2

    Place the pieces of PVC pipe, with the T-fitting, on the ground. Use the tape measure to separate them to a distance of four feet.

    3

    Set two of the 4-foot pieces of PVC pipe at the top and bottom of the two pieces of pipe, with the T-fitting, to form a box shape. Apply PVC cement to the ends of the 4-foot pieces.

    4

    Connect the ends at each corner of the PVC pipe into a three-way 90-degree connector. The third hole of the 90-degree connector should be facing upward. This will be the bottom section of the aviary.

    5

    Repeat steps one through four to assemble the top section of the aviary. Set it aside.

    6

    Apply PVC cement to each end of the 6-foot pieces of PVC pipe. Place the 6-foot lengths of PVC pipe into the holes on the 90-degree connectors of the bottom section. These pieces will be the supports or walls for the structure.

    7

    Place the top sections of the aviary on top of the 6-foot pieces of PVC pipe. Adjust the PVC pipe to fit into the T-fittings and the 90-degree connectors.

    8

    Place wire mesh over the completed aviary. Cut any sharp edges with the wire cutters. Secure the wire mesh to the PVC pipe with zip ties.

    9

    Cut the wire at one end of the aviary for the door. Cut any sharp edges with the wire cutters. Place the 4-by-6-foot piece of clear plastic over the opening. Place holes in the top of the plastic. Secure it to the PVC pipe with the zip ties.

Timneh African Gray Cage Requirements

Timneh African Gray Cage Requirements

Timneh African grays need lots of space to stretch their wings. Generally you want your bird to be able to spread his wings out completely and turn around while sitting in the middle of the cage. Provide one or two stable perches of about 1 to 2 inches in diameter for your bird to rest on while eating, chewing or sleeping. Also, provide and rotate three to five bird-safe toys at a time to keep your bird busy and active when it is inside its cage. These toys should be rotated regularly and new toys provided.

Cage Size

    Timneh African grays reach a size of about 11 to 13 inches long, which means they need a cage large enough to accommodate their height and wingspan. Some timneh owners prefer a cage that is 30 inches long, 30 inches high and 30 inches deep. However, other timneh owners feel a cage that is 36 inches wide and 24 inches deep will work just fine, too.

Cage Bars

    The bar spacing for timneh African grays needs to prevent the bird's head from reaching the outside of the cage; thus, the spacing between each bar needs to be at least half an inch to 1 inch between each bar. Bar spacing smaller than this is generally found in cages that cannot accommodate larger birds such as the timneh African gray.

Cage Materials

    Timneh African grays require a cage that is specifically manufactured for pet birds. Metal is best because it can withstand the chewing and climbing of large birds. The safest and most resilient cages are veterinary-approved, constructed from stainless steel, and completely zinc-free.

Cage Door

    The cage door needs to be able to comfortably accommodate your hand and your bird. The door should allow you to bring the bird out of its cage and place it back inside of its cage while perched erect (not bent or hunched over) on your hand. Additionally, because of the intelligence level of timnehs, some owners will use a locking mechanism such as a bird-safe cage clip to prevent timnehs from escaping.

Jumat, 10 Juni 2011

How to Make a Bird Climbing Net With Manila Hemp

How to Make a Bird Climbing Net With Manila Hemp

Many parrots come from the rain forest and like to climb. A rope climbing net provides a pet bird with a climbing area that mimics the bounce and sway of the hanging foliage and vines they would find in their native habitat. Purchasing a bird climbing net can be expensive; as of early 2010, a medium-size, 3- by 4-foot manila hemp rope net costs about $120. Making a bird climbing net at home is a much less expensive option. And your bird won't know the difference.

Instructions

    1
    An example of a natural fiber rope.
    An example of a natural fiber rope.

    For a 3- by 4-foot climbing net with 6-inch squares, 3-inch rope frays around the outside and a hanging loop in each corner, cut seven pieces of rope 84 inches long, five pieces of rope 108 inches long, and one piece of rope 34 feet long. Wrap masking tape around all cut edges of the rope to keep them from fraying.

    2
    An example of an overhand knot.
    An example of an overhand knot.

    Find the exact middle of the 34-foot rope. Fold the rope in half at the middle and measure 12 inches down. Make a loop, and tie an overhand knot.

    3

    Measure 6 inches from the base of the overhand knot and, using one side of the 34-foot rope and one piece of the 84-inch rope, create a Japanese bend knot. Leave about 3 inches of overhang from the 84-inch rope to fray later. Measure 6 inches from that knot and create another Japanese bend knot, leaving a 3-inch overhang. Repeat with all seven pieces of 84-inch rope.

    4

    Measure 6 inches from the seventh Japanese bend knot, then measure 24 inches of rope, fold it in half and make another overhand knot so that it lands at the 6-inch mark.

    5

    Turn it so that the 84-inch pieces of rope are horizontal and the new overhand loop is in the top left corner. Measure 6 inches from base of the overhand knot, and make a Japanese bend knot using a piece of the 108-inch rope, leaving 3 inches for fraying.

    6
    The familiar box pattern of a net will start to emerge.
    The familiar box pattern of a net will start to emerge.

    Measure 6 inches down the piece of 108-inch rope and 6 inches to the right on the 84-inch rope to make the first link in the net. Make a Japanese bend knot at the cross point. Repeat down the entire length of the 108-inch rope.

    7

    Measure 6 inches to the right of the first Japanese bend knot, and start another length of 108-inch rope. Repeat until all five lengths of rope are used.

    8

    Measure 6 inches from the last length of 108-inch rope, then measure 24 inches of rope, fold it in half and make another overhand knot so that it lands at the 6-inch mark.

    9

    Measure 6 inches down from the overhand knot, and make a Japanese bend knot with the remaining length of 84-inch rope. Repeat to the end of the rope, including the last link in the bottom right corner.

    10

    The bottom right corner of the finished net will have two strands of unconnected rope; connect them using an overhand knot to create the last hanging loop.

Selasa, 07 Juni 2011

How to Make a Climbing Grid Rope for Birds

Climbing ropes are an excellent form of enrichment for birds, which is why they have become popular with bird owners. Birds can climb on ropes, hang upside down on them and chew them, which results in lots of exercise. Large rope grids for macaws and cockatoos can cost more than $100 at specialty bird retailers, but you can save money by making your own.

Instructions

    1

    Determine how long and wide you want your grid rope to be. Measure the space it will hang from to decide just how big you want to make it.

    2

    Purchase your rope and quick links. Choose the rope thickness that works best for your bird; for example, use 1/2 inch for a parrotlet or 1 inch for a macaw. You will need to buy about 15 to 20 times the length of the longest side of your grid. For example, if the longest side is 6 feet, you will need at least 90 feet of rope.

    3

    Cut the first four lengths of rope that will be your edges.

    4

    Lay out the four pieces of rope to make the outline or frame of your grid. Overlap the ropes at the corners. At each of the four corners leave one long piece of rope hanging beyond the grid frame. These will be used to attach the rope grid to the parrot's play area.

    5

    Tie the corners of the grid using a knot that will not slip. A square knot or a rolling hitch will work well.

    6

    Cut the pieces of rope that you will need for the horizontal and perpendicular lines of the grid.

    7

    Lay the rope lines down on the grid where you want them. There should be enough space in the holes of the grid for your bird to climb through and not get strangled. Suggestions for hole sizes are 7 inches by 7 inches for a macaw, cockatoo, or Amazon, or 4 inches by 4 inches for cockatiels or lovebirds.

    8

    Tie all of the ropes at connection points. Use the same knot throughout to have a consistent look.

    9

    Cut off any loose pieces. There should only be four long pieces of rope coming from the corners to hang the grid by.

    10

    Attach a quick link to each of the long corner pieces. Your bird's grid rope is now ready to be hung for him to enjoy.

Senin, 06 Juni 2011

How to Buy a Finch Cage

Buying a cage for your finch is one of the most important things you'll do for your pet. Consider the species' unique needs, and you can easily make the right cage choice. With the right finch cage, she'll get plenty of safe exercise and will be a content and healthy bird.

Instructions

    1

    Choose a cage that's big enough for your finches to fly from one side to the other. They don't need a tall cage, but they do need a long one to get enough exercise. A common name for this style of cage is a flight cage.

    2

    Consider the number of finches you have. A pair of finches needs a cage at least 30 inches long. House larger groups of finches in longer cages. If that isn't possible, get a tall cage that's at least 30 inches long so your finches can establish their own flight paths across the cage.

    3

    Measure the spaces between the bars to make sure your finches can't get stuck in them. A safe size for breeding finches and for small varieties is -inch-by--inch mesh, but larger non-breeding finches won't slip through -inch-by-2-inch mesh.

    4

    Accessorize the cage minimally. Finches aren't interested in bird toys, and they need to be able to fly easily through their cage. Install a few perches at the ends of the cage. Finches enjoy swings, so you can add a couple of them out of the way of their flight paths.

Jumat, 03 Juni 2011

Homemade Finch Cage

Homemade Finch Cage

Finches, like all pet birds, need adequate shelter. Bird enclosures can become quite expensive, so, for those bird owners who are handy with a hammer, building a cage themselves can be a feasible option. Every good pet owner wants to ensure his bird's health and happiness in its new home. When constructing a cage yourself, consider several important aspects before you start to build. Finches are small birds, so a cage designed for flight can be as small as 36 inches wide by 15 inches high and deep.

Use Nontoxic Wood for Framing

    Because finches, and all birds, are such sensitive creatures, the materials used should not be toxic or harmful in any way. Any wood products used must be completely untreated and well sanded to avoid any splinters which might harm your bird. Explain your situation to any salespeople helping you when purchasing the wood for this project to ensure that you get the correct type of wood.

Choose Nontoxic Metal Products

    Like wood, choosing nontoxic metal is key to ensuring your finch's health when building your own bird cage. Any metal that is treated with zinc or lead should not be used, as both are toxic. Galvanized metal is also toxic for birds and should be avoided. Stainless steel or powdercoated wire mesh will work fine, although it may be costly. When working with wire mesh, make sure all wire edges are properly finished so that there are no exposed ends which may cut you or your bird. For finches, a wire mesh that has a 1/2-inch opening size works well, but you must regularly clip their nails so they do not get caught in the fine mesh.

Keep Cleaning In Mind

    It is easy when building to get caught up in the process and forget practical aspects of the structure you are building. All bird cages need to be cleaned regularly, so any building plan you are using should have a removable drawer at the base of the cage for cleaning purposes. If it does not, it should at least have a door large enough to make cleaning easy. Reevaluate your plans if neither of these aspects are included.

Appropriate Climbing Structures

    Having finished assembling your bird cage, you will need to include climbing structures for your finches. Wooden dowel may seem like the best option, but in fact it provides your birds with little exercise. Instead, use real branches from nonpoisionous trees such as fruit trees. Choose branches free of any visible mites or other insects which might infect your bird. Wash the branches before fitting them in your cage to remove any pollutants such as pesticides, which could harm a finch. When selecting branches make sure they can easily fit through the cage door so they can be removed for cleaning. To clean, simply wipe them down with a damp cloth and replace them when they become brittle.

Kamis, 02 Juni 2011

How to Buy Syntrax Nectar

Syntrax Nectar is a brand of protein drink popular with bodybuilding and health enthusiasts. This product was developed as an alternative to heavy protein shakes and is made strictly from whey protein isolate. Whey protein isolate allows Syntrax Nectar to have a sweet, fruity taste without additional sugars that add unnecessary calories. Syntrax Nectar is normally mixed with water, although it can be blended with fruit and ice if desired.

Instructions

    1

    Speak with your doctor before beginning any diet or bodybuilding routine. He will give you a complete physical to make sure you are healthy enough for physical activity. Ask your doctor any questions you might have about Syntrax Nectar during this appointment.

    2

    Visit your local nutritional center to purchase Syntrax Nectar. Nutritional stores and other vitamin retailers should carry the product.

    3

    Call health food stores in your area to see if they carry Syntrax Nectar. Most health food stores have a section dedicated to diet and bodybuilding supplements and stock a variety of protein supplements, including Syntrax Nectar.

    4

    Log on to Syntrax's website and purchase the product directly from the company. Syntrax Nectar comes in a number of flavors, including pink grapefruit, fuzzy navel and lemon tea. If you have never made a purchase over the Internet or prefer to speak to a representative directly, you can call the customer service number listed on its website.

How to Build Boxes for a Mandarin Duck Nest

The mandarin duck is originally from China but is now found throughout China, Japan, Southern England and Siberia. They are often found on exhibit in zoos. They prefer a habitat that is mostly wooded, but ones that have water nearby. The typical brood is eight to ten eggs. They typically nest in holes in trees that overhang the water. You can, however, help them find a place to nest by building a nesting box for them.

Instructions

    1

    Utilize cedar lumber that is unfinished and 1 by 10 inches (3/4 of an inch thick by 9-1/4 inches wide).

    2

    Cut the wood into six pieces. Cut the first piece measuring 31 inches by 9.25 inches; the second, third, and fourth measuring 23.5 inches by 9.25 inches; the fifth measuring 7.75 inches by 9.25 inches; and the sixth measuring 14 inches by 9.25 inches.

    3

    Label the first piece one--back; the second two--side; the next three--front; the next four--door; the next five--floor; and the last six--roof.

    4

    Attach the back and the side pieces together. Use four screws, two on each side. Insert the screws from the back piece into the side piece.

    5

    Utilize a drill to add five drainage holes along the bottom piece measuring a half inch each.

    6

    Use two screws to attach the floor to the side and back. Attach the screws from the back to the floor.

    7

    Draw an oval for the entry hole on the front. Measure the hole to be 4-1/2 inches by 3-1/2 inches. Use an electric jigsaw to cut out the hole once you have made a pilot hole with a drill.

    8

    Use a handsaw to make score marks on the inside of the front piece to give a place that helps the duck to climb out of the nest box.

    9

    Attach the front to the box using six screws.

    10

    Use an electric sander to round off the top front of the door. Attach the door to the box on the opposite side of the side piece. Screw one screw through the front into the door and one from the back into the door to create a hinge you can lift the door by, giving you access to clean the nest box.

    11

    Add wood shavings to the bottom of the box, approximately five inches thick.

    12

    Attach the roof by using seven screws. Place three screws through the back into the roof, avoiding the door, and four screws from the front into the roof.

    13

    Attach your nest box to a six foot tall two by four that has been embedded in the ground. Use six screws to attach it through the back of the two by four into the back of the box.