Sabtu, 30 April 2011

How to Sew a Birdcage Cover

How to Sew a Birdcage Cover

Many domestic birds require peace and quiet at night to sleep peacefully, and a birdcage cover can help. When you cover the cage, it dampens sound and light to provide the bird with a safer habitat for sleeping. Create a birdcage cover at home for a custom fit in a style that suits your home.

Instructions

Planning

    1

    Measure all sides of the cage including width, height and depth to create your pattern. Take both size and shape into account when designing a birdcage cover pattern.

    2

    Draw the birdcage cover pattern on butcher paper. Add seam allowances of at least 1/2 inch to all sides. Make sure that the pieces for the cage sides and top are sized to fit the dimension of your cage. The finished cover should be larger than the cage so that you can easily pull it on and off.

    3

    Choose a fabric that suits how cool or warm the cover should be. If it gets cold at night, choose a thicker, warmer fabric. Cooler, lighter fabrics are ideal for warmer and more humid climates where providing warmth is not required.

Construction

    4

    Cut out the pattern pieces and pin them to the fabric. Use one pattern piece for front and back, one for the sides and one for the top. Cut out two sides, one front, one back and one top piece.

    5

    Pin the side, front and back pieces to one another. Sew these pieces together by hand or using a sewing machine. Trim excess threads.

    6

    Pin the top pieces to all four sides of the cover. Sew the top piece on by hand or using your sewing machine. Remove any excess threads.

    7

    Fold and pin in the bottom hem of the bird cage cover with enough allowance for the elastic. Sew all around the bottom hem, leaving an opening to insert the elastic.

    8

    Insert the elastic into the bottom hem of the bird cage cover. Sew the elastic together to form a single ring, then sew closed the opening to finish the hem. The elastic will keep the bird cage cover tight around the cage, providing additional security and comfort for the bird.

Jumat, 29 April 2011

How to Set an Incubator

How to Set an Incubator

Obtaining the best results from a hatch depends on the accurate functioning of your incubator. Two fundamental types of incubators are available, these being the still air and the forced air models. Forced air incubators incorporate a fan, which still air incubators do not. Be familiar with the manufacturer's instructions before turning your incubator on. In order to function correctly, the incubator needs to maintain a select humidity and temperature. The humidity in an incubator is read from a hygrometer and is best controlled by adjusting the surface area of water that has been placed in the incubator.

Instructions

    1

    Fill the glass vile that contains the wick of the wet-bulb hygrometer with water. Position the hygrometer into the incubator.

    2

    Fill a small bowl with water and place it carefully onto the floor of the incubator.

    3

    Set the thermostat on the heater for 101.5 degrees Fahrenheit.

    4

    Close the door of the incubator and wait at least 24 hours for the temperature and humidity to stabilize.

    5

    Open the door of the incubator and read both the temperature and the humidity. Use the humidity conversion chart to obtain the correct humidity, which should be between 60 and 65 percent during the first 18 days of incubation.

    6

    Adjust the temperature either up or down as required, by turning the thermostat control knob on the heater.

    7

    Fill a second bowl with water and position it next to the first bowl, if the humidity is lower than 50 to 55 percent. Be aware that the humidity within the incubator is influenced by the humidity in the environment. During January and February, because of the low humidity that is associated with these months, it is difficult to maintain a high humidity in an incubator.

    8

    Remove the first bowl and replace it with a smaller bowl, if the humidity is higher than 50 to 55 percent. This situation is likely to develop during June and July, when the humidity around the incubator is high. Humidity is influenced by the available surface area of water. The larger the surface area of water in the incubator, the higher the humidity will be.

    9

    Close the incubator door and wait for 24 hours to check if the humidity is closer to the desired reading.

Senin, 25 April 2011

How to Hang an Outside Mounted Nest Box

When breeding birds, hanging nest boxes on the outside of the cages or aviaries can make them considerably more accessible to the owner. Outside mounted boxes also don't take up space within the cages, giving your pairs more room to move around, play and fly. Most outside mount boxes come without instructions or mounting hardware, but they are not difficult to hang with a few inexpensive supplies from your local hardware store.

Instructions

    1

    Hold the box up to the cage, exactly where you want to mount it. If the cage has a nest box door, be sure to hold the box in such a way that the entry hole on the box lines up with nest box door.

    2

    With the nest box held against the outside of the cage, use a pencil to mark the location of horizontal cage bars. Making sure that the box is level, mark where the horizontal bars are on the front of the box in two or three places.

    3

    Take down the box and use a ruler to extend your markings into horizontal lines across the front of the box. This will let you see where the screw hooks can go so that they will attach the box to the cage at the proper height.

    4

    Choose four spots to insert the screw hooks. Ideally, two should be about an inch from the top of the box, and two should be about midway down the box. The screw hooks will need to go into the edge of the side panels that face the front of the box, so that they do not extend into the box itself. Mark the spots to drill 3/8 inch higher than the lines you drew showing the location of horizontal bars. This is so the top of the screw hook rests on the horizontal bar when the box is mounted at the location you chose.

    5

    Drill holes in the four spots you made, using a drill bit slightly smaller than the diameter of the the screw hooks. The holes should be about 1 inch deep.

    6

    Screw in the no. 10 screw hooks. You can do this by hand most of the way, but the last few turns will probably require a pair of pliers. Make sure that the entire straight portion of the hook is within the wood and the hook itself is straight with the rounded part at the top.

    7

    Remove the nest box door entirely, if your cage has one. How to do this varies by cage manufacturer, but usually you will need to open the connecting hooks of the door using a pair of pliers. If your cage does not have a nest box door, you will need to use wire cutters to create a square or rectangular opening large enough for the entire entry hole of the nest box to be unobscured. If you do need to cut a hole, make sure to file down the edges until smooth to avoid injury to the birds.

    8

    Lift the box up and hang it by placing the hooks over the horizontal bars. There may be a small gap between the box and the cage itself, but this should not be large enough to cause a problem. The weight of the box should keep it firmly in place.

Minggu, 24 April 2011

How to Build a Nest for a Single Male Dove

How to Build a Nest for a Single Male Dove

A male dove may rest inside of a nest in its cage. Depending on the bird, he may not use the nest much without a female. If you decide to add a female bird to the cage, she will use the nest too. Doves build rather weak and loose nests in the wild. This makes it easier to make one. Generic nesting materials from a pet store will be sufficient to create the male doves nest.

Instructions

    1

    Rinse out the plastic bowl. If you use wood, don't rinse it. Dry the bowl. Select a bowl big enough for the dove to sit in.

    2

    Place the woven nesting material into the bottom the bowl. Push it down so it lines the bottom of the bowl.

    3

    Rest the bowl inside of the cage. Place it in a relatively clear area near a perch, but not toys. The perch should sit level to the nest, but not next to it.

    4

    Place one to two handfuls of nesting materials in the bowl. The male dove may rearrange the materials.

Rabu, 20 April 2011

How to Make Your Own Toys for Love Birds

How to Make Your Own Toys for Love Birds

Parrots, such as love birds, require frequent stimulation. One way to do this is through a variety of toys that the bird can bite, chew, tear, and shred. To keep your bird healthy, toys should be rotated weekly, and new toys added often. Since new toys are so often needed, they can quickly become a burden on the pocketbook. Making your own bird toys not only saves you money, but it also protects your bird from harmful chemicals.

Instructions

    1

    Select a variety of toy parts that are a mixture of bright colors, textures, and materials. Peacock feathers, feather boas, and loose feathers make excellent preening toys.

    2

    Clip feathers, strings, and sticks into manageable pieces using nail clippers. Work them in between cage bars or stick them into other toys.

    3

    Distribute different fruits and vegetables around the cage by staking them to natural-fiber rope. Make sure to remove them daily.

    4

    Drill holes into the center of baby blocks, string them onto rope, and attach them to the inside and outside of the cage. You can also add other toys parts in between the blocks to give the love birds some variety.

    5

    Cut the tips from both sides of toothpicks using nail clippers, and add them to the bottom of the cage. Birds love to maneuver them into cage bars or toys.

Selasa, 19 April 2011

Information on Cages for Poultry

All types of poultry need a place to roost. Even free-range birds needs a place where they feel safe. Poultry cages can provide that safe roost. Sometimes called a comfort cage, poultry cages come in all sizes and shapes and can fit into any poultry shed. Some chicken cages and larger poultry cages are portable so you can easily take your birds for exhibition at fairs or sales.

Function

    A comfort cage allows the producer better control over the food that the birds eat. This is essential to the health of the flock as well as to egg production. The nest in the comfort cage helps to protect the eggs from breakage. The eggs also stay cleaner. Poultry cages also serve to protect the flock from predators and help keep the birds safe.

Features

    The roost inside the cage should be an appropriate size for the bird to sit on. Allow enough room for all the birds in the cage to roost at the same time. Chicken nests should be approximately 13 inches deep, 12 inches wide and 15 inches long. All wires should be smooth so the birds can't hurt themselves as they brush against them. The wire mesh on the floor must be small enough that the birds can't get their feet caught. Waterers and feeders attached to the outside of the cage makes it roomier for the birds inside the cage. Doors should open out and have a mechanism to latch it in the open position if the birds are able to roam. Unless the cage is set directly on the floor, the birds must have a ramp so they can get to the ground safely.

Size

    Chickens need at least two to three square feet per bird in their cage. Larger birds need more space. Whether the cage is homemade or purchased from a farm supply store, it's important that the cage be large enough for the birds.

Benefits

    One of the key benefits of a poultry cage is it allows the owner to easily clean up after the chickens or other birds. It's simply a matter of moving the cage and removing the excrement. There is less likelihood of soiled shoes every time eggs are gathered. Nests are easier to keep clean as well, which means the birds stay cleaner. A clean bird is more likely to be a healthy one. The bird's diet is easier to regulate as well.

Warning

    If the birds don't have enough space, egg production drops off. The birds that share the cage may begin picking at each other's feathers. They may even cannibalize each other, so making sure the chicken cage is large enough is essential.

How to Build a Blue Bird House

How to Build a Blue Bird House

Because of man-made establishments, most bluebirds have lost their homes and are in need of places to nest. Building bird houses for bluebirds and placing them in scarcely populated areas has become a viable alternative. If you would like to contribute to the bluebird population by building them a home, follow these steps.

Instructions

    1

    Start with four 12-inch pieces of 1 x 6-inch cedar board. Cut one 8-inch long piece for the front. Leave one piece the full size for the back. Cut the tops of the two side pieces angled down 1 inch from back to front. Use the 4-inch piece, left over from the front piece, for the bottom.

    2

    Use a power drill with a spade bit to create a hole in the front piece, about 1 1/2 inch. Make the hole 2 inches from the top. Use a table saw to cut a slight angle on the top of the front and back boards, so the roof lies flush after it is attached.

    3

    Attach both side boards to the front board. Create a hinge using 2-inch finishing nails on the right side and a 1 5/8 inch wood screw near the top of the left side.

    4

    Lay the back board on top of the front and side boards. Make sure the back board is 1/4 inch higher than both side boards, leaving a gap on each side for ventilation. Create the other side of the hinge on the left side using a 1-5/8 inch wood screw. Attach the right side to the backboard with 2-inch finishing nails.

    5

    Angle cut each corner of the floor board 1/4 inch. This provides the bluebird house with drainage. Nail the floor to the front, back and right side boards using 2-inch finishing nails. Do not nail the left side to the floor. This is the door and must be able to swing up.

    6

    Create a lock for the hinged door by drilling a hole through the front board into the left side board. Slip a nail into the hole to keep the door closed. The nail should pull out easily to provide access to the inside of the bird house.

    7

    Place a 1 x 10-inch cedar board on top of the bird house box and attach it using 1 5/8-inch wood screws. Pre-drill the holes for the screws to make them easier to install.

    8

    Mount the box to a 6-foot conduit pipe, using straps so that the hole is 5 feet from the ground.

Senin, 18 April 2011

How to Clean Bird Perches

Pet birds spend much of their time standing, walking, and climbing on perches. Since bird perches are almost always made of wood, they can harbor bacteria that a surface cleaning will not eliminate. This is especially true when using natural perches with the bark intact, although these are superior to dowel perches in every other way. Perches should be cleaned thoroughly every week, and disinfected or discarded every month to prevent infections in your bird's feet.

Instructions

    1

    Spray down the entire perch with an enzymatic cleaner such as Poop-off. Make sure to saturate the entire perch, including the mounting hardware. Wait a few minutes for the solution to loosen droppings and food debris.

    2

    Scrub the perch using a stiff brush, while holding it under running water. Continue scrubbing until the perch is completely clean. Take special care to thoroughly scrub any cracks, holes, chewed areas, or other imperfections in the wood.

    3

    If you will be disinfecting the perch, continue to Step 4. Otherwise, allow the perch to dry completely (preferably in the sun) before remounting it in the bird's cage.

    4

    To disinfect the perch, you will need to make a bleach solution. Wear gloves and eye protection when handling this mixture and be sure to work in a well-ventilated area, ideally outdoors. Mix one part chlorine bleach to nine parts water in a clean mop bucket. Submerge the perch in the solution and leave it in for 10 minutes.

    5

    Remove the perch from the solution, and rinse very thoroughly under cold running water. Allow the perch to air dry completely, preferably outdoors in the sunlight, before reinstalling it in the bird's cage.

Rabu, 13 April 2011

How to Build an Aviary Roof for Budgies

How to Build an Aviary Roof for Budgies

A correctly designed aviary roof will keep your budgies safe and protect them from the elements. Pitched roofs are popular among budgie fanciers as they extend the amount of available space within an aviary. Nest boxes can be placed within such roofs and budgies can also perch or roost in this area, if sticks are provided for this purpose. Bird keepers, with the help of an assistant, can construct their own budgie aviary roof at home.

Instructions

    1

    Ensure that zoning regulations do not dictate the aviary height. If such exist, they will influence the design of roof. Such regulations may require that the aviary itself be relocated to another site on the property.

    2

    Lay the different pieces of timber on level area, as close to the aviary as possible.

    3

    Set the circular saw to cut at a 30 degree angle. Cut each end of six, 65-inch long, 2-inch-by-3-inch wooden planks, so as to form a 30 degree angle.

    4

    Nail three of these together to form an equilateral triangle. Nail each plank so that it abuts against the other. Repeat this process with the remaining three planks.

    5

    Position two 90-inch long, 2-inch-by-3-inch wooden planks, parallel on the ground and 65-inches apart.

    6

    Place one of the two equilateral triangle frames vertically across each end of the two 90-inch long planks. Ask an assistant to hold the frame in place. Nail the triangle frame onto the two 90-inch planks.

    7

    Repeat with the second equilateral triangle frame. Place this second equilateral triangle frame vertically across the opposite ends of the two 90-inch long planks. Nail this second triangle frame onto the two 90-inch planks.

    8

    Position the third 90-inch plank against the left hand side of both triangles, at their apex. Request that the assistant holds this plank in place and nail it onto each of the two triangles.

    9

    Position the forth 90-inch plank against the right hand side of both triangles, at their apex. Request that the assistant holds this plank in place and nail it onto each of the two triangles.

    10

    Position the fifth 90-inch plank against the left hand side of both triangles, at their base. Request that the assistant holds this plank in place and nail it onto each of the two triangles.

    11

    Position the sixth 90-inch plank against the right hand side of both triangles, at their base. Request that the assistant holds this plank in place and nail it onto each of the two triangles.

    12

    Nail one of the 2-inch-by-3-inch wooden planks, 65-inches long, from the apex to the bottom on the left hand side of the structure, at the one end.

    13

    Nail a second 2-inch-by-3-inch wooden plank, 65-inches long, next to the first and then nail a third, forth, fifth and sixth.

    14

    Nail a 2-inch-by-3-inch wooden plank, 65-inches long, from the apex to the bottom on the right hand side of the structure, at the same end that the six pieces have been nailed to the left hand side.

    15

    Nail a second 2-inch-by-3-inch wooden plank, 65-inches long, next to the first and then nail a third, forth, fifth and sixth, on the right hand side. These wooden sides create the solid portion of the roof, to protect the budgies from sun and rain, as required.

    16

    Cut sufficient 16-gage wire from the roll, to cover the open section of the roof.

    17

    Drape the 16-gage wire over that section of the roof that does not have solid sides. Use the staple gun to attach the wire to the roof frame. Attach the wire securely to prevent budgies from escaping and predators, such as domestic cats and vermin from trying to enter.

    18

    Cut a piece of wire from the roll, the shape of a 65-inch-sided triangle. Position and secure this mesh with staples along one side of the open end of the roof. Repeat for the opposite open end of the roof.

    19

    Request the assistant to help you lift the roof onto the aviary. You may require a ladder, depending on the height of the aviary.

    20

    Nail the roof securely onto the aviary frame.

How to Make a Bird Collar

How to Make a Bird Collar

Pet birds occasionally damage themselves by pulling out feathers or biting themselves. This is especially true for Quaker parrots, and even has a name: Quaker Mutilation Syndrome. When your pet bird is mutilating itself, it might be necessarily to construct a collar. The collar will inhibit movement of the neck, so that it can't reach down to hurt itself. Elizabethan collars, which look like cones, are commonly used to encourage a bird to stop biting itself, but they can be cumbersome and uncomfortable. Making a collar from foam tubing will be less traumatic for the bird, and just as effective.

Instructions

    1

    Look at the different sizes of foam pipe insulation to determine which size will fit best around your parrot's neck. For example, an average-sized Quaker parrot should have collar with a penny-sized hole in the center. The tubes made to insulate a 3/8-inch iron pipe and a 1/2-inch copper pipe both have a hole with this diameter.

    2

    Use a sharp knife to saw the tube to the appropriate length. For the average sized Quaker parrot, the collar should be between 1 1/2- and 1 5/8-inches long. The shorter the collar is the more comfortable it will be for your parrot to wear; however, you want to make sure the collar isn't short enough for your bird to tuck its beak into it. Start with a collar at 1 1/2-inches long, and if this size is too short, cut a new piece 1/8-inch longer. Continue increasing the collar length by 1/8-inch until the bird can no longer stick its beak in it.

    3

    Remove the protective papers if your tube came with a slit with adhesive applied to it already. Then close the slit so that the adhesive is secure. Cut a new slit on the opposite side of the collar using scissors.

    4

    Hold the collar open and mostly flat with one hand, and cut the outside edges off using a pair of scissors in your other hand, so that the edges are more smooth.

    5

    Cut a piece of cloth tape about 6 or 7 inches in length and set it aside.

    6

    Have one person hold the bird's neck out by placing their thumb on the back of the parrot's head, and a pointer finger beneath the beak.

    7

    Put the collar on the bird from beneath the bird, so that the slit is on the back of the bird's neck. Make sure there are no feathers in the slit and squeeze it together. Then wrap the cloth tape around the collar to secure it. Be careful not to catch any feathers in the tape as you wrap it around.

    8

    Cut the tape on the slit to remove the collar. If you need to remove the collar often, always put a new piece of cloth tape over the slit.

How to Build a Hummingbird House

Hummingbirds don't use conventional type bird houses, they much prefer their homes to be open. That is good for us bird watchers because it allows for an complete view as they come and go and raise their young. Hummingbirds make their nests in the fork of the branches on a tree. They don't like a lot of wind and their nests can't be open to a downpour, so proper placement of your hummingbirds new house is also important. This nesting station by itself will not attract the bird, however, their are plants and feeders you can use to get them to your yard.

Instructions

    1

    Cut your piece of copper pipe at about 12 inches. At one end take a hammer and flatten the end. Drill a hole for your wood screw. Bend the pipe to form a half circle leaving about 3 1/2 between the top and bottom and extending the extra few inches out straight. At the bottom of the half circle, you need to make a corner leading to the piece that goes straight. Right after the corner, flatten about 3/4 with a hammer and drill another hole, this time for your bolt.

    2

    Flatten a 3/4 circle in the remaining piece of pipe at the center and drill for your bolt. Bend the pipe at each side of the flattened part to form a V.

    3

    Attach your two pieces of pipe with the bolt coming from the bottom and nut being on the top. The bolt should stick through just a little. Take a couple of cotton swabs and hot glue them to the bolt sticking up. The pieces should look like a fork in branches. They will use two to build their nest on and the other to stabilize the house.

    4

    Cut your water jug and use one of the flat sides for the roof. You can get fancy here and make it look like leaves and paint it green or brown and make it look like branches.

    5

    Drill a hole through the center of your piece of dowel. Now you can put it all together. At the top of the pipe place your roof, then the washer and last the dowel. Put your wood screw up from underneath and screw into an eve of your house or shed. Pick the side that has the least amount wind and a couple inches away from the wall. Now all you have to do is wait for your hummingbird.

Selasa, 12 April 2011

Bird Supplies for a Canary

Bird Supplies for a Canary

What Are the Stones for Budgies?

What Are the Stones for Budgies?

Budgies swallow tiny stones, pebbles and grit to aid digestion. Hobbyists typically feed fine oyster shells to their budgies, particularly during breeding season. Oyster shell grit has a high calcium content, which assists the female budgies or hens to produce eggs with strong shells. Grit is required as a nutritional supplement and as an aid to grind up seeds and other particulate items in the budgie's muscular stomach. Grit is an integral part of a wild parakeet's diet and should be fed to captive budgies.

Ingredients in Grit

    Mineral grit is packaged by various bird food manufacturers and contains tiny pieces of limestone, quartz, charcoal and the sterilized shells of mollusks. These commercial grit products also contain a variety if additional ingredients, including sterilized egg shells, refined bone meal, fine sea sand, calcium carbonate, salt and copper sulphate. Soluble grit provides a source of trace minerals, including calcium carbonate, for budgies. Calcium carbonate is digested in the first part of the budgie's stomach and provides a valuable source of calcium.

Grit Considerations

    Some aviculturists believe that grit causes the budgie's crop to become compacted and refrain from feeding it. According to Rosemary Low, a parrot specialist and Dr Stacey Gelis, a bird veterinarian, budgies benefit from eating soluble grits. They believe that a budgie's crop becomes compacted when it has been denied correct mineral supplements for extended periods and subsequently gorges itself on grit, once it is eventually offered the product. Rosemary Low says that budgies that died from compacted crops were also likely suffering from a digestive or other type of illness.

Role of Grit

    Budgies have a high metabolism and store food in their crop while their gizzard and stomach are digesting the previous meal. Food then passes from the crop to the gizzard, where pieces of grit and tiny stones assist the keratin plates to grind it into smaller pieces in preparation for digestion. Grit, therefore, plays a part in mechanically breaking down food and is not totally responsible for the process. Grit is eventually worn down in the gizzard and finally passes into the digestive tract. Minerals that make up the grit are then absorbed by the lower digestive tract.

Feeding Grit

    Budgies have individual temperaments and behaviors. You can leave a bowl of grit with many budgies that will eat in healthy and safe ways. However, you should not allow fledgling and ill budgies to help themselves to grit. In these cases, you should sprinkle a pinch of grit over their food. Mineral grit sticks to diced pieces of fruit and, by offering small amounts once a week, hobbyists should not be concerned about giving too much.

Sabtu, 09 April 2011

How to Build a Breeder Cage

How to Build a Breeder Cage

Many birds do not need a large breeder cage for breeding. The cage doesn't have to be as sophisticated as decorative store-bought cages either. A simple cage used for breeding birds can be built easily with basic lumber supplies, wire mesh and hardware. These kinds of cages are used by private breeders that do the work at their home and also breeders in pet stores. Build your own breeder cage in less than an hour spent in a wood shop.

Instructions

    1

    Lay two 24-inch boards flat, parallel and 15 inches apart. Position two 18-inch plywood on edge, parallel and 24 inches apart so the ends of the two boards are against each sheet of plywood. The plywood sheets function as the top and bottom of the cage. Glue the boards to the plywood in this position and screw through the plywood, into the ends of the boards. Use four screws. Repeat this step so another pair of 24-inch boards are secured between the plywood sheets on the opposite pair of 24-inch edges. This is your breeding cage frame.

    2

    Lay two 24-inch boards flat, parallel and 15 inches apart. Set two 15-inch boards between them at right angles so the corners are flush. Screw through the 24-inch boards and into the 15-inch boards using four screws. This is the door to your frame.

    3

    Fold your 54-inch wire mesh around the cage frame so you have one open side, and so the 54-inch edges are flush with the top and bottom of the cage. Pound 16 evenly spaced staples into each of the three covered sides. Pound eight staples into each board, and four into each edge of the plywood sheets.

    4

    Lay your last 25-inch mesh over the door frame so the edges are flush and staple it down using 16 staples.

    5

    Position a pair of half hinges against one of the 24-inch boards on the cage frame that make up the open side. Space the hinges 20 inches apart and check to make sure they can fold 270 degrees around the outside of the board. This will ensure the door on the cage opening freely. Screw the hinges in this position using the screws provided. Screw the other pair of half hinges to the door so when the door closes it is flush with the cage.

    6

    Screw the swivel latch pieces to the cage and cage door, opposite the side with the hinges and so it is 11 inches away from the top and bottom of the cage. The swivel latch cannot open on its own. This is your completed breeder cage.

Kamis, 07 April 2011

How to Organize a Parrot's Cage

Your parrot will need to have a cage set up in your home in order to protect it and to offer it a place to live, eat, drink and sleep. You will need to understand how to set up and organize these materials so that your parrot will feel comfortable when it is in or around the cage.

Instructions

    1

    Make sure the parrot's cage is large enough to house the parrot and all of its supplies.

    2

    Place a food dish, a water dish and a treat dish inside the cage. Make sure these dishes are always clean and full of fresh food and water. Parrots like to dip their food in water, so you should clean the water a couple of times each day for the parrot.

    3

    Add chew toys inside the cage. Parrots will chew on anything made out of wood, so wooden chew toys are a good option. Otherwise, the parrot may try to chew on wooden things around your house. Add some brightly colored toys that make noise to keep the parrot entertained.

    4

    Change the paper on a daily basis. Most cages have a sliding tray that makes paper changing easy. Never allow your parrot to have dirty cage, because this could cause illness for the bird.

    5

    Set the cage by a nice window. This will allow the parrot an opportunity to look out the window and get fresh air on nice days.

Senin, 04 April 2011

How to Make a Bird House for Doves

How to Make a Bird House for Doves

Doves prefer shallow nests made from twigs and pine needles on ledges and limbs. Nests are between five and 25 feet off the ground and hold two white eggs. Both parents take part in incubating the eggs for two weeks and feeding them for another two weeks before they fledge. Providing nesting areas for doves helps combat habitat loss and increases their chance of survival.

Instructions

    1

    Trim the edges of the wire to make a 12-inch diameter circle.

    2

    Cut out one small wedge in the wire using the wire cutters.

    3

    Roll the circular wire into a cone the largest end 10 to 12 inches in diameter.

    4

    Wire the cone into place using the stainless steel wire.

    5

    Fold back about one inch of the largest end to make a smooth surface. This prevents the doves from getting injured if they bump the opening of the wire cone.

    6

    Wedge the cone in a sturdy branch in tree and secure it in place using the stainless steel wire.

Types of Brooders

Types of Brooders

Brooders are temperature-controlled enclosures for hatching and raising baby birds. They are used by agricultural breeders of poultry, commercial purveyors of domestic birds such as parakeets and canaries, and wildlife rescue. They are also employed by rehabilitation and repopulation scientists for saving endangered species, and for individuals who make small-scale purchases of baby chickens and ducklings or need to nurse a sick or injured bird. Brooders are available commercially or can be built as a do-it-yourself project.

Commercial or Hospital Brooders

    If you are unsure of the features you'll need in your brooder, consult with local sellers of commercial brooders, such as farm and ranch supply stores and breeders. Commercial brooders are built to maintain the ideal temperature, humidity, air quality and airflow for baby birds, who do not respond well to variations in temperature and can die if chilled or overheated. They are also equipped with darkening shades and appropriate lighting; some young birds are stressed by bright light and prefer a dark nest-like environment, while others do well in lit enclosures. Your commercial brooder should know which style will make the best home for your fledglings. Commercial brooders are often called hospital brooders and are used as a habitat for birds that are ill or have been injured.

Aquarium Brooders

    Many bird hobbyists and professional breeders use modified aquariums as brooders. These should be equipped with light, heat, air filters and humidity control that can be monitored with an attached thermometer and hygrometer (humidity measurer). Many pet stores have lid attachments for aquariums with these features built in. You can DIY an aquarium into a brooder by placing it on a heating pad turned on to the low setting, lining it with towels covered by a layer of paper towels for easy cleanup, and screening the top. Add a dish of water for humidity and keep the temperature set and steady at the setting the breeder or vet advises. Use another towel to cover all or part of the aquarium to maintain the correct temperature and make the bird(s) feel secure.

Box Brooders

    If you purchase baby chickens, ducks or other poultry, they should be of an age where they do not need much time in a heated brooder, if any. Once the babies have graduated from the commercial or aquarium brooder, move them into a box-style brooder that gives them room to move around and eat and drink water without being crowded. Box brooders can be made out of anything from wood panels to large Plexiglas or plastic containers. Rabbit hutches made of small-gauge wire mesh make good intermediate brooding boxes. Keep these containers in a warm environment---inside the house or a heated barn or garage---and keep them stocked with food and water. Brooder cleanliness is also very important to the health of your flock, so clean the habitat daily.

How Big a Cage Should an African Grey Parrot Have?

How Big a Cage Should an African Grey Parrot Have?

    African Greys need room to explore and entertain themselves.
    African Greys need room to explore and entertain themselves.

Minimum Cage Size

    The minimum size cage that an African Grey should be kept in is 40 inches tall with a 36-inch base. The cage should be large enough that your parrot can extend and flap its wings without hitting the sides or other obstructions. Any shape besides round is acceptable. Round cages have cause problems with parrots' sense of orientation and have even caused psychological problems.

Larger is Better

    Generally the larger the cage you can afford, the better. A larger cage will allow your Grey more room for activity and exercise making it a healthier and more mentally active bird.

Bottom Line

    According to the African Grey Parrot website, you should give your parrot as much room as you can afford to walk and climb. Round or undersized cages prevent the area from serving as the place of refuge it is intended to be.

Minggu, 03 April 2011

How to Make an Aviary for a Cockatiel

How to Make an Aviary for a Cockatiel

Cockatiels were first discovered in Australia in 1770, but didn't become popular until the 20th century. With approximately 340 species, the popularity of cockatiels as pets is second only to the Budgie. Cockatiels have a life span ranging from 15 to 20 years and are highly social birds that require plenty of attention. In the wild, cockatiels are ground feeders, so an aviary that is wider as apposed to taller is preferable. You can build your own cockatiel aviary using items found at most hardware stores.

Instructions

    1

    Clear a space in a well used area of the home, preferably a corner of a living or dining room.

    2

    Construct four equal size frames using 2-by-4's and galvanized nails. The size and number of birds will determine the height and width of the frames. A good rule of thumb is that a single cockatiel will need at least 14 inches of width to accommodate wing span and at least 16 inches of height to fly from perch to perch.

    3

    Wrap each panel in 1 /4-inch wire mesh. The finished side will be the outside of the panel. Secure the mesh to the inside of the frame using a staple gun and galvanized staples. Make a small cut on each corner so the mesh wraps neatly around corners.

    4

    Place one panel against a wall or lay it down on a flat surface, finished side out. Construct the first three walls of the aviary by aligning the long ends of the panels and securing them with a hammer and galvanized nails. This will make a three sided box.

    5

    Install two metal hinges about two inches from the top and bottom of the fourth panel. Align the hinged panel to the open side of the three sided box. Secure the top hole of each hinge to the frame of the box. Test it to make sure it closes properly. Make adjustments if necessary, then secure the remaining holes.

    6

    Install a locking mechanism to the unhinged side of the door. A hook and eye is simple. Use a small pilot bit and an electric screwdriver to make pilot holes in both the frame and door, then screw the hook into the door and the eye into the frame.

    7

    Staple wire mesh over the top of the aviary using galvanized staples. If the wire mesh is not wide enough to cover the entire aviary, overlap each section at least 4 inches.

    8

    Place the aviary in the desired location. Use newspapers to line the bottom. Install perches at varying heights, then release your cockatiels into their new home.