Selasa, 31 Agustus 2010

How to Make a Quaker Parrot Cage

How to Make a Quaker Parrot Cage

Quaker parrots are small, talkative, intelligent birds that are popular as pets because of their size and sociability. Their intelligence and skill with puzzles can make building a cage for a Quaker parrot difficult. Left alone with a simple latch gate, a Quaker parrot will quickly manage to escape. Making sure there is adequate space in the cage and a complex latch is the best way to ensure that your bird stays put.

Instructions

    1

    Using the plywood pieces to create the top, bottom, back and two sides, glue the edges into place one at a time so that only the front side of the cage is open. Once the glue has dried and is temporarily holding the sides, screw the walls into place.

    2

    Set a 1-by-4-inch piece of wood horizontally in front of you. Use the drafting compass to draw a line from the top left corner coming toward the center of the plank, creating a 45-degree angle in relation to the top. Repeat on the top right corner, with the line coming toward the inside. Saw along each pencil line, removing two corners and creating a trapezoid. Repeat with the other three 1-by-4 pieces.

    3

    Align the cut sides of each 1-by-4 piece to create a frame. Glue the cut sides in place one at a time, then screw them together securely.

    4

    Sand down any rough edge on the cage sides and frame, then apply the nontoxic paint. Let dry.

    5

    Set the frame down flat on a steady surface. Position the weld mesh so it is centered on top of the frame. The mesh and frame will have a 1-inch overlap on each side. Firmly secure the mesh to the frame, using the staple gun.

    6

    Attach one side of each hinge to one side of the frame, about 8 to 10 inches apart. Attach the other side of each end to the left side of the cage box, so that the door will open out.

    7

    Install the latch mechanism to the right side of the door frame. If possible, use a small padlock to make sure your Quaker parrot won't escape.

Senin, 30 Agustus 2010

Instructions for a Purple Martin Bird House

Instructions for a Purple Martin Bird House

Purple martins are migratory birds, with striking glossy purplish-black feathers. These birds are beneficial near a home or garden, because they eat a large number of insects each day. The presence of purple martins will greatly reduce the number of insects that attack a yard, and they are interesting to observe, as well. Purple martins return year after year to a nesting site, creating a tradition that will last until the housing is destroyed.

Instructions

    1

    Draw a 2 and -inch-diameter circle 3 to 5 inches from the bottom base of the gourd. Drill a small hole in the center of the circle with a small drill bit. Make the hole large enough to fit the saw blade into.

    2

    Saw out the rest of the circle with the jigsaw. Throw the gourd plug away. Use a spoon to scoop out all of the gourd insides, including all seeds and gourd flesh.

    3

    Drill several -inch-diameter holes in the bottom and top of the gourd for ventilation and drainage. Repeat the process for all the remaining gourds. Set the gourds aside while you build the roosting pole.

    4

    Tie the 8-foot pole horizontally across the top of the 15-foot pole with the 1-inch-thick rope. Make sure to secure the poles together tightly, so that the horizontal bar cannot fall. Glue the rope into place after tying for further security. Allow to dry for two hours.

    5

    Screw the eyelet screws into the tops of the gourds. Tie a 6-inch piece of 1/4-inch rope through each eyelet screw and onto the horizontal pole. Place one gourd every 12 inches along the horizontal pole, making sure the gourds cannot strike each other. Tie the rope as close to the pole as possible to prevent the gourds from swinging wildly in the wind.

    6

    Dig a 2-foot-deep hole in the spot where you want to place the purple martin roost. Mix some quick-set cement and pour it into the hole, filling the hole halfway with cement. Stick the pole into the cement and allow it to dry for 2 to 3 hours. Fill the rest of the hole back up with dirt and pack tightly.

Breeding Loft for Homing Pigeons

Breeding Loft for Homing Pigeons

Homing pigeons return to the loft where they live when released in another area. The breeding pair builds a nest and the hen lays two eggs in the nest. The cock and hen take turns incubating the egg for 18 days. The eggs hatch and the squab (young pigeons) spend 30 to 32 days in the nest. A week after laying the eggs, the hen builds a second nest and lays two more eggs. The breeding pair keeps busy incubating eggs in one nest and feeding the squab in the second nest. Consider this behavior carefully when building a backyard breeding loft for homing pigeons.

Instructions

    1

    Build a shed or loft with an attached fly pen for the homing pigeons. A workable loft size is 4 feet by 8 feet with a 7-foot height. Provide a sturdy roof and a door for easy access.

    2

    Construct the breeding loft so it is dry and draft-free. Make it rodent- and cat-proof. Design the loft so both shade and sunlight are provided to the birds throughout the day.

    3

    Attach the nest boxes to an interior wall of the loft. Provide two nest boxes for each breeding pair of pigeons. The nest boxes are 12-18 inches wide, 12 inches high and 12 inches deep with a closed back.

    4

    Place a 1-inch-by-4-inch board across the front bottom of each nest box to retain the nest material and keep the eggs and squab from falling out. Extra nest boxes will prevent quarreling among the breeding pairs.

    5

    Construct a separate perch in the loft for each bird. Perches can be made from 1-inch-by-4-inch boards. Attach the 3-inch-long perches to the board across the front of each nesting box.

    6

    Design an easy-to-clean loft to avoid a buildup of feces. Cover the floor with an inch of sand and place bedding material on the bottom of each nest box.

Minggu, 29 Agustus 2010

How to Make Foraging Toys for Birds

How to Make Foraging Toys for Birds

In the wild, birds spend a large percentage of their time finding and gathering food, or foraging. However, for birds kept as pets, such as parrots, food is very easily accessible. Homemade foraging toys for your birds, which mimic the actions they undertake in the wild, are ideal for mentally stimulating your companions. According to the Veterinary Medicine department of California University's Davis campus, birds are very intelligent animals and foraging for food in different areas of their cages is highly enriching.

Instructions

    1

    Flatten an empty toilet paper tube. An easy way to do this is to press it against a hard surface.

    2

    Punch a hole in one end of the empty toilet paper tube. This hole should go through both sides of the cardboard tube.

    3

    Fold the bottom of the flattened toilet paper tube up approximately 1/2 inch. Tape the bottom closed securely, so that no bird seeds, pellets or treats can slip out.

    4

    Fill the cardboard tube with bird seeds and pellets. Choose your bird's favorite treat, such as popcorn, and add some of that into the toy as well. Only use food and treats that are suitable for birds.

    5

    Thread a length of ribbon through the hole you punched in the top of the tube in Step 1. If desired, tape the top closed as well to make the toy more challenging for your bird.

    6

    Hang this homemade foraging toy in your bird's cage for him to play with.

Jumat, 27 Agustus 2010

Why Don't My Parakeets Get in Their Nesting Box?

Why Don't My Parakeets Get in Their Nesting Box?

Breeding parakeets, also known as budgies, offers an inexpensive but potentially profitable hobby. Having the proper equipment and using the right techniques can insure that your female happily goes into her nesting box. Choosing the correct pair is the first consideration. Younger birds are preferred since they may not already have had a bad experience that would hamper their mating. Do not mate siblings as this can increase the chance of continuing masked diseases.

Possible Reasons for Avoiding the Nest

    Consider the conditions of the nesting area as this may be a reason for the female parakeet to avoid the box. Make sure your cage is in a cool (not cold) room and never too near a heater, as this may damage the eggs once hatched. The heat and dryness of the box may prevent the female from entering the box at all. Female birds are particularly sensitive during the breeding period and must not be disturbed by loud noises or too much activity.

Choosing Good Parents

    Choose birds that have no obvious defects such as crippled feet or poor plumage. The pair you select, if compatible, should begin to bond rather quickly. This is exhibited by mutual grooming, sitting side by side and chirping to one another. It is best to wait until the birds are fully matured, around 1 year old, before breeding. Before breeding your pair, prepare the nesting area.

A Nesting Box Worth Coming Home To

    Select a nesting box that is made specifically for a parakeet. The nesting box entrance hole should be 1 1/2 inches in diameter. A small opening may prevent a bird from venturing in. Attach your nesting box outside the cage so that your interior space is kept open for activity. You can do this yourself by cutting some of the wire bars to allow the opening to face into the cage. Attach the box with wire hooks.

Make the Bed Appealing

    The purchased box generally comes with a perch located on the outside of the entrance hole. If yours does not, simply drill a hole directly below the door and fit the perch into it. The nesting "bed" should not be located directly in front of the entrance but off to the side to avoid trampling of the young once they hatch. Pet stores sell bedding for nesting, and it is best to use this as opposed to straw, pine or cedar bedding.

Kamis, 26 Agustus 2010

How to Build a Parrot Stand

There are few pets with as much personality as parrots. These intelligent, affectionate birds provide tons of entertainment and make devoted companions. Give back to your feathered friend by providing a custom made parrot stand for him or her to play on or perch on while eating. Here is a simple, affordable stand that costs less than ten dollars to make and can be assembled in minutes.

Instructions

    1

    Attach the threaded base footing to the piece of plywood. The type of wood selected does not matter, but the heavier it is the more stable the perch will be.

    2

    Screw the three foot pipe into the base. This will be the foundation of the parrot stand.

    3

    Connect the tip of the pipe to the metal lined T fitting. This tip will hold the parrot stand solidly in place so it does not wobble.

    4

    Thread the wooden dowel through the T fitting. The dowel will be the actual stand for the parrot.

Selasa, 24 Agustus 2010

How to Pick Toys for a Cockatiel

Part of keeping your cockatiel happy and healthy is making sure the bird has plenty of different types of toys that you can rotate in and out the cage often. If the bird gets attached to a particular toy, that one can be a permanent fixture, but you want to keep your cockatiel entertained. This is especially true when you are not at home. Bored birds quickly develop behavior issues that are very hard to undo. Picking good toys will help you avoid that problem.

Instructions

    1

    Size matters. Make sure you are picking a toy that is the appropriate size for your bird. Most pet stores have the toys divided by bird size. You dont want to get your cockatiel a Macaw toy, but you also do not want to buy him a canary toy. Look at the bird on the packaging. It should be a cockatiel, parakeet, love bird or some other small to medium sized bird. If it isnt supposed to take up half the cage but it does, that is a red flag.

    2

    Safety first. Make sure that the toys do not have lead or zinc in them. Both of these substances are toxic to the birds and they could develop long-term health effects from the exposure. Lead has been linked to fatal seizures in pet birds, so just be aware of what the toy is made of. Cockatiels are notorious for pulling their toys apart. If they do, you want to make sure that they cannot be hurt by any of the parts that might break off. The can get caught up in ribbons and even get them wrapped around their necks. If you decide to save money and make your own toys, make sure that you are not including any materials that are toxic.

    3

    Know your bird. Of course this will be hard at first, but as you get to know your cockatiel, pay attention to what he does and does not like. If you buy a swing and even after a month he still wont go near it, avoid swing toys. If you discover he likes the stringy hang down toys, look for different variations of that type of toy.

    4

    Dont be discouraged. When you first bring a toy home, she may not warm to it immediately. Some cockatiels will avoid new toys until they know it can be trusted.

Senin, 23 Agustus 2010

How to Choose a Pigeon Coup

Whether you're keeping pigeons as pets, for racing or homing purposes, it is important to house them properly in a well made pigeon coup. The pigeon coup you choose will have a great impact on the quality of life of your feathered friends.

Instructions

    1

    Determine the number of pigeons you would like to house. This will obviously factor into the decision you make about the size and dimensions. Also keep in mind if you would like to breed pigeons in the future.

    2

    Enclose two sides of the pigeon coup. Pigeons prefer to have at least two sides of their dwelling enclosed to provide an extra sense of security.

    3

    Leave plenty of room for the pigeons to move. The recommended dimensions for a standard racing pigeon are 5 feet by 6 feet. Of course, the more room, the better.

    4

    Select an appropriate perch. Pigeons prefer a wider perch, about 5 inches wide. A brick is a good choice and works well to help keep the pigeons nails trimmed.

    5

    Choose a coup that will be easy to darken. Pigeons like their dwelling to be dark while resting, so a coup that has a top or can be easily turned away from the sun is a good choice.

    6

    Contact other pigeon enthusiasts. Many pigeon breeders would be happy to share their pigeon coup designs or direct you to vendors that specialize in this type of product. An experienced pigeon fancier will have some great suggestions for choosing a pigeon coup.

Sabtu, 21 Agustus 2010

How to Accessorize a Parakeet's Birdcage

Parakeets are playful birds that love having toys and other accessories in their cages to play with. It's important to pick safe toys and place them appropriately in the cage to help your parakeets feel comfortable and to avoid injury. Once you have chosen and installed a variety of accessories, sit back and enjoy watching your parakeets play. Read on to learn more.

Instructions

    1

    Measure your parakeet's cage to determine the size and number of accessories you can get.

    2

    Choose several perches of varying diameters and materials. Place them in the cage as to simulate tree branches.

    3

    Provide a variety of toys, such as knotted rope toys, wooden toys, swings and bells.

    4

    Secure a mirror inside the birdcage where your parakeet can play with his reflection.

    5

    Give your parakeets a cage-tent, nest box or other form of hideout.

    6

    Place supplements and (occasional) treats, such as cuttlebone, millet seed and nuts, in your parakeets' cage.

Rabu, 11 Agustus 2010

Homemade Incubator Techniques

Homemade Incubator Techniques

When a duck, turkey or chicken lays eggs, it's vital that those eggs receive warmth, protection and humidity. These are usually provided by the mother sitting on the nest until the eggs hatch. In some cases, however, the eggs must be hatched through artificial techniques. In that case, the person doing the hatching needs to make sure that the eggs' needs are satisfied.

Warmth

    The most obvious egg requirement is warmth. Most eggs need temperatures of 99 to 102 degrees for their entire incubation period. Any home setup should be equipped with a heat source (light bulb or heat lamp) to provide this warmth, and a thermometer to measure the temperature. An ideal setup is also equipped with a thermostat to directly control the temperature.

Humidity

    A little-known fact about eggs is that they require moisture to hatch. Different species of eggs require different levels of humidity, but humidity generally ranges from 50 percent to 65 percent. In homemade setups there is no way of measuring humidity levels. Anyone attempting to hatch eggs by hand is advised to spray the eggs with water at each turning, to maintain as much moisture as possible.

Turning

    Mother birds turn their eggs over consistently throughout the day to give the embryos circulation. It's important that people mimic this behavior when hatching eggs by hand. General wisdom is that eggs should be turned over three, five or seven times each day.

Protection

    Any incubation devices should be protected while it's harboring eggs. Put incubators in areas that don't get regular traffic, where they're safe from accidents. Put incubators in places where they are protected from drafts, direct sunlight and disruption. This also makes temperature control easier.

Selasa, 10 Agustus 2010

Backyard Bird Habitat

Backyard Bird Habitat

Creating a backyard bird habitat can be as easy as setting up a bird feeder or as complex as landscaping with native plants, flowers and grasses. Birds need three things to thrive--food, water and shelter. By providing all three in your yard, you'll likely attract dozens of species throughout the year. Birds love variety, so set out several feeders with different kinds of food, and place shallow pans of water in various locations to get their attention. Build your own birdhouses to encourage birds to return to your yard every season. Attracting birds to your backyard is both simple and inexpensive, with immeasurable benefit to both you and wildlife.

Feeders

    Different feeder styles and foods attract different species of birds. According to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, the first step in setting up feeders is to decide which birds you want to bring into your backyard. Use a bird field guide to discover the birds in your area of the country and what foods they like, then erect feeders to attract them. The most effective styles for seed are tray/platform, hopper, window and tube feeders, while wire-cage feeders work best with suet. Nectar feeders will attract hummingbirds, orioles and fruit-loving birds. To attract the greatest number of species, choose several styles and scatter them throughout your backyard.

Water

    Water is a necessity for attracting birds. Give birds a clean source of water with a shallow birdbath set low to the ground, rather than on a pedestal, to mimic a puddle or pond. Place gravel or clean sand in the bottom for substrate, and lay a few branches over the bath to let birds drink without getting wet. Empty and replace the water every other day to prevent mosquitoes, algae or contamination. Clean the bath with a scrub brush if dirt or bird droppings begin to accumulate.

Nest Boxes and Materials

    Birds are likely to return to your yard every season if you give them plenty of nesting materials and boxes. Follow guidelines (available online from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology) for building your own nest boxes to attract specific species and keep out others. Woodpeckers, chickadees, nuthatches, wrens, bluebirds, owls and some ducks are cavity nesters and will readily set up house in a homemade nest box. Robins, swallows, flycatchers and doves prefer to nest on a semi-enclosed platform. For species that simply nest in trees, put out a selection of nesting material like dried grass, twigs, yarn and bits of cotton batting. Be sure to place the nest boxes in the appropriate settings and clean them thoroughly every season to keep them in good shape.

Brush and Ground Cover

    Backyard birds appreciate a safe haven to escape predators, such as dense brush, shrubs or trees. Encourage birds to visit by maintaining a wildlife-friendly yard. Keep a brush pile in a corner of your property. Start one with your old Christmas tree and set feeders nearby. Keep native trees or shrubbery on your property to maintain the natural landscape of your region of the country, and leave fallen trees, branches or wild plants on the ground rather than removing them.

Landscaping

    Landscaping to attract birds requires planning, but can result in an optimum environment for dozens of species all year long. Plant a variety of native plants and trees. Not only will you diversify the natural offerings to birds, but also reduce the amount of upkeep you'll need to perform. Native plants usually require less watering or pesticides than ornamental or non-native species. Choose deciduous and coniferous plants that bloom in all seasons, especially those that provide food like seeds, fruit or nuts. Plan a dense thicket with dead wood, climbing vines or hedge. Scatter wildflower seeds over beds on your property to beautify your yard and grow a feast of seeds for birds.

Jumat, 06 Agustus 2010

How to House Lovebirds

Lovebirds are a small species of parrot that originates from Africa. These beautiful, vocal birds are highly prized for their colorful plumage. They have specific housing needs that cater to their temperaments and size. With the proper cage and care, lovebirds can be happy and healthy household pets.

Instructions

    1

    Get a cage before getting lovebirds. Find a cage that is roomy enough for them to move around and explore their environment. Avoid the tiny ornamental cages that are sometimes sold for lovebirds. These are too small to keep the birds happy.

    2

    Secure the cage with an extra clip or tie to keep the cage latch closed. Lovebirds are adept at escaping from cages.

    3

    Purchase a food cup that attaches to the cage, and a matching water cup. Attach each cup securely to the bars of the cage. Provide clean water in the water cup and check it often to make sure it is not full of seed hulls.

    4

    Provide bird seed in the food cup, and occasionally add different foods into the cup such as small pieces of fruit. Offer the lovebirds spinach and other green vegetables regularly as part of the birds' care as well.

    5

    Buy lovebirds in pairs, if you are not home often to keep the birds company. Keep just one lovebird, if desired and only if you have a lot of time to interact with and care for the bird.

    6

    Give the birds a few toys and items such as a cuttle bones for them to chew on. Line the bottom of the cage with a cage liner that you must clean and change often.

Kamis, 05 Agustus 2010

How to Make Bird Toys for Profit

How to Make Bird Toys for Profit

Toys are an integral part of a captive bird's environment. They provide various textures, colors, shapes and noises that appeal to birds and help exercise their minds as well as their muscles. It makes sense to create your own toys because they can be expensive. If you enjoy creating bird toys, you may find that you can market your toys to other bird owners.

Instructions

    1

    Invest in some quality tools. Building bird toys requires tools such as an electric drill, needle-nose pliers, a saw and a sander.

    2

    Buy your supplies in bulk. This will give you more supplies at a lower cost. If you are starting out small, you can purchase bulk products from various online bird toy vendors. If you create a large line of products, you can buy bulk items at wholesale cost.

    3

    Experiment with different methods in creating your toys. Use brightly-colored, concentrated dye on wooden parts. Once they've dried, you can string them onto a base of cotton rope and decorate with different types of plastic beads, leather and other toy parts.

    4

    Create a small line of prototype toys. Test your prototypes out on your birds and adjust the toys as necessary.

    5

    Analyze the cost of building each toy. Break down the price per piece to calculate your cost. Figure out how much time the toy took to make, and price appropriately. This is your retail price.

    6

    Market your toys to friends. Use free advertising such as online classifieds. Contact your local bird club and consider placing an ad in their newsletter. If there are local bird shows, rent a table and sell your toys there.

How to Build a Cool Bird House

How to Build a Cool Bird House

There are hundreds of ways to build a birdhouse, but to build a cool birdhouse requires only one unique element: an observation window. The window allows for intimate observation of the nest inside the birdhouse. You can watch as the parent birds build their nest, incubate their eggs, the eggs hatch out, and as the baby birds grow, you can watch as their parents feed and care for them. A few simple materials and everyday tools are all that are needed to build this type of birdhouse.

Instructions

    1

    Choose a window of your home that you would like to use as the observation window into the birdhouse.

    2

    Draw five square outlines on the sheet of plywood (12 inches by 12 inches). Cut them out using a skill saw.

    3

    Take a drinking cup with a 4-inch diameter and place it on one of the 12-inch by 12-inch boards right in the center of the board. Use a pencil to draw a circle around the bottom of the cup.

    4

    Remove the cup and use a jigsaw to cut out the circle.

    5

    Glue all five boards together in the form of a box. Place the board with the hole in it flat-side down on a table. Line the edge of this board with a 3/8-inch bead of wood adhesive all the way around the edge of the board. Glue the other four boards to this bottom board forming a square box. Let it dry following the drying time instructions on the wood adhesive label.

    6

    Place the dry birdhouse up on end so that the round hole of the birdhouse is facing you. Screw a threaded eye hook into the top of the birdhouse. Screw a second eye hook into the window frame or eve above the window you'll be using for observation. Attach a lightweight chain to both hooks connecting the birdhouse to the house. Allow the birdhouse to hang against the window with the round hole facing out and the open side of the birdhouse against the window. Adjust the chain accordingly in relationship to where you want it to hang on the window.

    7

    Paint or decorate the birdhouse. Use the silicone to adhere the birdhouse to the window by first running a 3/8-inch bead of silicone around the perimeter of the back side of the birdhouse. Squish the birdhouse against the window hanging from the chain. Hold the birdhouse against the window until the silicone sets up a little. Once the birdhouse feels attached, run another bead of silicone all the way around the birdhouse where the backside of the birdhouse and the window meet. Wipe off any excess silicone.

Selasa, 03 Agustus 2010

How to Identify Bird Cages

Selecting the right bird cage for your pet bird ensures you will have a happy pet. Your bird cage should be large enough for your bird to spread its wings with plenty of room on either side. There should also be enough room for your bird to move about freely among toys and food and water containers. To help you find the best home for your bird, look at the bird cage size, what the cage is made of and how it is made.

Instructions

    1

    Look at the size of the bird cage. Finches, canaries and budgies usually enjoy the smallest bird cages. Most of these cages are coated wire cages and they come in a variety of sizes and colors.

    Cockatoos and conures (small to medium-sized parrots) need medium-sized bird cages. Many of these cages are metal and range in the area of about two feet wide and three feet tall .

    Macaws, African Greys and parrots need large bird cages. Most of these cages are metal or stainless steel and range from about two feet wide and four feet tall and larger.

    2

    Check the distance between the bars of a cage. Bars range from one-half inch to one and one-third inches apart. The space between each bar needs to be smaller than your bird's head to prevent it from becoming trapped between the bars. Most budgie bird cages have bars that are spaced one-half inch apart. Larger birds can live in cages with bars spaced one inch apart.

    3

    Look at the material of which the cage is made. Wire cages are economical and metal cages are some of the most popular cages. The bars in metal cages are generally coated and less resistant to rust and chipping. Stainless steel cages are the most expensive and the most durable of bird cages. Many last a lifetime and most are strong enough to withstand the power of any beak.

    4

    Examine the construction of the birdcage. Dome birdcages provide lots of living space for your bird. They are tall and usually have a rounded top.

    Cages with play tops, or solid tops, allow your bird an area to play on top of the cage.

    Flight bird cages are much larger than many bird cages. These cages usually house more than one bird and allow multiple birds the opportunity to get plenty of exercise.

Senin, 02 Agustus 2010

How to Build Quail Pens

One quail pen does not meet all the needs of a game bird owner. Whether transporting these game birds for dog training, breeding quail for release, or raising eating birds, quail need different pens for different purposes. Here are some ideas for building your pens.

Instructions

Build a Quail Breeding Pen

    1

    Purchase or cut galvanized wire in the following sizes: 4 pieces 10-by-24 inches and 2 pieces 10 inches squares. This makes a cage large enough to hold 4 quail.

    2

    Place three sides of the quail pen side by side along the 24-inch length. Bind the quail pen roof and two sides together with wire, forming a rectangle without a bottom.

    3

    Add one 10-inch piece at one end, placing the 10-inch side at the roof, and wire shut the top and down 7 inches on the two sides. Wire the other square at the other end, but only at the top of the pen for a door.

    4

    Bend the unwired portion of the sides in to create a sloped bottom of the cage. Attach the bottom of the cage, bending the ends to conform to the sides. Leave the end piece square so the pen sits with a downward slope.

    5

    Build multiple breeding pens using the right side of one cage as the left side of the next cage. Use bailing wire around the bottom of the cage for extra support.

Build a Quail Flight Pen

    6

    Design a simple flight pen as a long, narrow building with a shed roof, enclosed sides and entrances at both ends.

    7

    Attach the flight pen to the quail coop bird entrance. A 15-foot wide and 30-foot long pen can hold up to 300 birds. Build a door at the end opposite the coop.

    8

    Pour a concrete footer, several inches wide, 12 inches deep and the length of the pen. Place rebar every 10 feet to slip the PVC side pipes over. Make two lines of stakes, 15 feet apart. Slip the pipes over the stakes.

    9

    Connect the two sides with a third PVC pipe creating a Quonset style frame. Along the bottom 3 feet of the frame, attach 1-inch wire mesh, buried 6 inches into the ground and up the three sides.

    10

    Attach poultry screen for the 3 feet above the mesh. Place game bird netting over the top and attach.

    11

    Install a door on the opposite end of the coop for easy entry.

Build a Quail Recovery Pen

    12

    Build a rectangular wire mesh box, 24-inches long, 18-inches wide and 10-inches high for up to 25 quail.

    13

    Cut a 6-inch circle on one long side of the rectangle, toward the side and not in the center. Make a 12-inch long wire mesh cone with a 6-inch wide large end and a 2 1/2 inch opening on the small end. Insert the cone in the hole with the small end in and attach.

    14

    Surround the other half of the cage with solid galvanized sheets as extra protection from predators. The quail still need to see the entrance.

    15

    Make a square lift door on the top or opposite side for easy bird retrieval.