Selasa, 27 Juli 2010

Homemade Parakeet Toys

Playful parakeets love to go for a swing, hang like a bat from hanging toys and shred paper toys. Making homemade parakeet toys is an inexpensive way to spoil your pet budgie, while flexing your imagination. Make a quick trip to the craft store, grab a drill, scour the cabinets for a few dried fruits, and you can easily craft a handful of homemade parakeet toys that rival the most expensive creations at the local pet store.

Supplies

    Choose to-making supplies that are safe for the parakeet to chew, and possibly ingest. To avoid a choking hazard, select beads and accessories that are larger than the bird's beak. Choose natural unpainted woods. Look for fruit tree branches or untreated pieces of lumber. Choose stainless steel metal accessories, and avoid zinc or lead. Use natural strings such as hemp or twine for fasteners, and avoid all glues. Natural, undyed papers may also be used. Add edible items such as dried fruits, plain popcorn and whole nuts to the parakeet toys.

Types of Toys

    Focus on three types of toys to make for your pet parakeet: chew, moving and climbing toys. Chew toys keep the bird occupied, while wearing down his beak. Hard wooden toys, calcium and mineral rings and toys with cuttle bones attached are healthy choices. Moving toys keep an active bird in motion. Make swings, or long ropes full of toys that can be pushed around and swayed. Climbing toys encourage exercise, and help the bird move around the cage from one play area to another.

Easy Toys

    Start with a natural fiber string, and build a strand of alternating colorful beads, unfinished wooden blocks and pieces of dried apricot. Tie a donut shaped mineral ring to the bottom of the strand to help it hang straight. Hang the toy from the ceiling of the cage for your bird to chew and push with her beak. Use a small drill to make holes in a piece of a branch from an apple tree. Thread a piece of hemp string through each end, making a swing. Hang the toy in the middle of the parakeet cage so he has room to maneuver the swing. Use pieces of untreated wooden dowel rods to make a small ladder. Use twine to attach the wood pieces, or use smaller dowels to fit the wood pieces together. Thread one large colorful bead on each ladder rung.

Minggu, 25 Juli 2010

Bird Breeding Products

Bird Breeding Products

If you're looking to expand your pet birds' family, considering breeding a pair. From parakeets to parrots, many pet bird species will reproduce in captivity when provided the necessary materials. Give your birds a safe place to lay eggs, as well as proper nutrition, caging and lighting, and they will be more inclined to breed. There are a few bird breeding products available on the market that can help.

Cage

    To create a comfortable breeding environment for birds, provide the animals with a cage large enough to allow them some flight. Flying is an important way to keep the birds healthy and happy, which is vital if you want them to breed. Don't clip the birds' wings while you're trying to breed them. They need their wings for exercise, but also to help them keep balance when mating.

Nesting Box

    A nesting box is essential when breeding birds. This covered compartment will provide a sanctuary for the animals during the breeding process. The birds will know they have a safe place to lay their eggs, and will therefore be more willing to mate and reproduce. This box should be made from wood. Unlike metal or plastic, the natural material will hold warmth and moisture in the box during egg incubation. Check with a bird specialist to understand the best cage location for the nesting box for your species of bird.

Nesting Materials

    Provide all-natural bedding materials when breeding birds. This material, typically made of cotton thread fibers, will help satisfy the birds' nest-building instincts. Once bedding materials are provided, you can watch birds decorate their nest by arranging and rearranging the material. Additionally, this nesting material will provide security and warmth for the eggs once they're laid.

Lighting

    Trick the birds into thinking it's springtime (their mating season) any time of the year with the use of an ultraviolet light. Hang the light above the cage and have it turned on for about 16 hours a day. These warm and bright rays will make the birds feel like it's time breed. Additionally, a UVB light will help the birds produce vitamin D, which keeps them healthy and assists with calcium absorption.

Nutrition

    Feed your birds a high-energy breeder formula to promote mating. This mixture should be fortified with minerals and vitamins, including protein and calcium. By providing this formula in their diet, birds will be able to gain needed weight after breeding. Avoid feeding the birds seed diets because they are typically high in fat and don't have all the needed nutrients.

Rabu, 21 Juli 2010

How to Build an Aviary With PVC Pipe

How to Build an Aviary With PVC Pipe

You can build a small aviary with PVC pipe for your bird. This project is simple but sophisticated and will save you money by giving you more space for your dollar. You can upscale this project to accommodate a larger number of birds. The parts for this are money saving compared to buying most commercial aviaries.

Instructions

    1

    Gather all of the parts that you need. Cut the pipes into nine 6-foot lengths using a hacksaw if this is not done for you already. Dry fit all the pipes together.

    2

    Make the base of the aviary. Lay four of the 6-foot lengths in a square. Slip a slip T connector onto two pipes that are opposite each other and position them in the center of these two pipes. Use the three way 90-degree elbow connectors at each of the corners with the empty hole pointing up and the other two holes connecting to the two adjacent pipes.

    3

    Build the walls. Slip a 6-foot length of pipe into each of the holes at the corners that points up. Slip another 6-foot length into each of the slip T connectors that are on the base.

    4

    Make the spine of the roof from another 6-foot section of pipe. Put a slip cross fitting in the middle of this pipe. Slip the ends into a the remaining two slip T fittings in the base of the T.

    5

    Hook the walls together with the tops of the pipes going into the spine. Bend the walls in from the sides to the connections on the spine. Start by connecting the two pipes that are midway in the walls coming up from the slip T connectors in the base to the slip cross fitting in the middle of the spine.

    6

    Seal the pipes together. You have to sand the pipe ends so that there are no burrs. Coat the inside of the pipe fittings and the parts of the pipe that will need to be permanently together with PVC primer and then with PVC cement. Slide the pipes together where you want them while they are wet. Wipe off the excess primer and cement with a rag.

    7

    Drape the wire mesh over the frame and cut it so it covers the frame. Bend the sharp edges of the wire outward to protect the birds and use zip ties every inch to seal the seams between the mesh panels. Use more zip ties to hold the mesh to the frame at 3-inch intervals (unless there is an open gap where you return to 1-inch spacing). Remember to leave half of the panel at the end open so that you can use it as a door. The aviary should look like a half of a pipe with the open side on the ground and should have half-moon shaped ends.

    8

    Make the door by cutting the half-moon shaped panel's wire down from the peak of the roof (at the spine) straight down to the ground and from the top of this line around, next to the frame to remove half of the half-moon shape.

    9

    Reinforce the door with more PVC pipe so that the birds do not escape. Cut the PVC pipe to fit the edges of the new door opening as it goes along the frame. Use three 90-degree elbow connectors, sandpaper (for burrs), primer and cement to form the door out of two 5-foot-10-inch PVC pipes and one 2-foot-11-inch pipe at the base. Attach the frame of the door with more zip ties. Use loose zip ties every inch to make a hinge down the line that drops from the peak so that it is tight enough that birds will not escape.

    10

    Bend every remaining loose end out on the cage to prevent injury to the birds inside the cage. Make sure that the door closes tightly enough to prevent the birds escaping, and use rope and tent stakes to keep the aviary on the ground.

Senin, 19 Juli 2010

How to Build Bird Perches

Birds living in cages must have some type of perch to be able to move around. A variety of different sizes, types and styles is best so that your bird has several choices. Bird perches are available at pet stores, but can be very expensive. You can make inexpensive perches for your birds that are just as good as store-bought perches. Learn how to build bird perches by following the steps below.

Instructions

    1

    Measure the width of the space between the bars of the cage. Get stainless steel bolts that will just fit between the bars and nuts that fit on the bolts. Also measure the ends of the wood pieces and get washers that are about that size. This keeps the ends covered so that the bird cannot easily gnaw the ends of the wood.

    2

    Drill a small hole in the center of each end of the wood. Make sure there are no cracks in the wood as you drill the hole. Drilling can also cause cracks, so inspect the wood closely after drilling the holes. Only drill a starter hole, as you will use the actual bolt to drill the complete hole.

    3

    Insert the hanger bolt into the hole and put a closed-end nut on the end. Grip the closed-end nut and use it to turn the hanger bolt and drill it into the wood. Insert the hanger bolt halfway into the wood. Remove the closed-end nut. Repeat this step on each end of the wood.

    4

    Place a washer onto each end of the wood and then secure it into place with a wing nut. Tighten the wing nut so that the washer doesn't move.

    5

    Place the perch in the cage and put the bolts on each end through the bars of the cage. Place wing nuts on the outside of the cage to tighten the perches into place.

How to Make My Own Basic Indoor Wire Mesh Aviary

How to Make My Own Basic Indoor Wire Mesh Aviary

Many pet birds live out their lives in simple birdcages. However, if you have the time and resources, building a home aviary can improve the quality of your pet's life, and allow it to exercise more. Building an aviary is often more cost-effective than purchasing one, and you can build it to suit your room layout and exact specifications.

Instructions

    1

    Decide on the size of your aviary. You can make an enclosure a few feet in length, or create a room-sized aviary for larger birds. Research the particular needs of your breed of bird, and purchase your supplies accordingly.

    2

    Build the PVC or wooden frame to the dimensions desired, building slightly off the ground for the slide-out tray. Stretch the mesh netting to enclose the frame and attach with nails or screws, depending on what the material takes.

    3

    Build a door. The size and construction will depend on the size of the aviary and the type of bird. Installing the door lower to the ground is safer, since birds fly up when startled.

    4

    Add the branches to the aviary. You can hang them from the aviary ceiling, or prop them on the ground. Since untreated wood cannot be sterilized properly, be prepared to remove the branches to prevent illness when they get too soiled.

    5

    Sterilize all other objects that will be included in the aviary. Add food and water dishes and hang swings and toys as desired. Slide the tray underneath the aviary to catch waste and remove when full for easy cleaning.

Sabtu, 17 Juli 2010

How to Choose a Cage for an African Grey Parrot

African grey parrots are medium sized parrots native to west and central Africa. There are two subspecies generally available as pets in the United States--the Congo Grey and the Timneh Grey. Although their appearance is slightly different, both subspecies make equally good pets. African greys are known for their high intelligence, excellent talking ability and sensitive natures.

Instructions

    1

    Choose a cage that is large enough to allow your African Grey room to move about and play. The cage should be at least 36 inches wide and 24 inches deep. The height of the cage is not as important, but it should be tall enough to allow plenty of space between the top of the bird's head and the top of the cage. Most cages designed for parrots of this size are at least 36 inches tall.

    2

    Measure the spacing between the bars. One inch spacing is appropriate for Congo Greys, and 3/4 inch for Timneh Greys. Wider spacing can cause injury, since the bird may get his head trapped between the bars. Spacing of 1/2 inch or less, while not dangerous, will make it much more difficult for the bird to climb on the bars.

    3

    Take a close look at the cage's construction. African Grey parrots have unusually powerful beaks for their size, and can bend and break the bars if they are not very sturdy. Stainless steel is nearly indestructible and easy to clean, but can be very expensive. Powder-coated cages are an excellent choice, as long as the bars are not too thin. Look for a cage with 10- to 14-gauge bars.

    4

    Look for a cage that has a square or rectangular shape for easier cleaning. If the cage has a grate, make sure it slides out easily. Since cages for African Greys tend to be quite large, one that collapses or can be easily disassembled will make clean-up easier.

    5

    Whenever possible, choose a cage that includes a stand with wheels. Large cages can be quite heavy and difficult to move without these features. The top of the cage should be at about eye level, or slightly higher, while it is on the stand.

    6

    Check the latches on the cage, including those on any feeding or nest box doors. African Greys are notorious for escaping, so the latches must be only accessible from the outside of the cage. Feeding and nest box doors often do not close securely, so padlocks may be necessary to prevent unsupervised excursions.

Jumat, 16 Juli 2010

How to Safely Dye Birdseed

How to Safely Dye Birdseed

The key to safely dyeing bird seed is the dye itself. Synthetic dyes have been linked to a host of different tumors throughout the body and cancer in lab rats. They can contain coal tar and petroleum, which may prove fatal for birds. All-natural dyes---totally organic and made from plant extracts---are not only non-toxic but also healthy.

Instructions

Coloring Bird Seed Safely

    1

    Pour bird seed into a bowl and add the natural food coloring.

    2

    Stir the natural food dye into the bird seed. Mix the seed with the stirring spoon to evenly distribute the coloring. Add more coloring for a darker color.

    3

    Pour the colored bird seed onto a cookie sheet to dry. Make sure to spread it out evenly on the sheet to avoid clumping.

    4

    Leave the baking sheet in the sun or slide it into the oven and set it at a low temperature to dry faster.

Rabu, 14 Juli 2010

How to Make PVC Homemade Bird Cages

Anyone who has owned a pet bird of any type has experienced the pain of shelling out sometimes vast sums on new cages that are often much smaller than your pet would like. Cages for larger parrots, in particular, can run into the thousands of dollars even for a basic set-up, and these cages rarely afford any room for customization. But with a few simple tools and a considerably reduced price tag, you can fashion roomy and attractive bird cages and aviaries from just PVC pipe and wire mesh.

Instructions

    1

    Decide on your dimensions and cut your pipe. For the purposes of this article, our cage will be four feet wide by three feet deep by five feet tall, with a door opening that is two feet square. The front of the cage (where the door opening will be located) will have a horizontal stabilizer bar to support the door frame. You will need four four-foot lengths of PVC, four three-foot lengths, two five-foot lengths, and four 29 -inch lengths for the main body of the cage, as well as two 23-foot lengths for the horizontal support bar. The door will require two two-foot lengths and four 11 -inch lengths.

    2

    Connect a four-foot pipe to a three-foot pipe with a three-way joint and allow them to rest flat on the ground in an L shape. Connect an additional four-foot and three-foot pipe to create a rectangle. Make sure that the empty openings on the three-way joints point up. Repeat with the remaining four-foot and three-foot lengths so that you have two rectangles.

    3

    Connect both of the five-foot lengths of PVC vertically to the rear of one of the rectangles. Connect two 29 -inch pieces vertically to the front of the same rectangle, then cap them each with a T-joint, followed by the next two 29 -inch segments. Place the second rectangle over the top, completing the main frame of your cage.

    4

    Construct the door opening by connecting the following in sequence: a two-foot length to a 90-degree joint, add an 11 -inch segment, a T-style joint, the next 11 -inch segment, a 90-degree joint, the next two-foot segment, another 90-degree joint, an 11 -inch segment, the final T-joint and the final 11 -inch segment. Connect the corner with the last 90-degree joint. The T-joints on the opening should point outward. Now connect the door opening to the 23-inch pieces of PVC with the T-joints, and connect the entire thing to the T-joints on the front of the cage.

    5

    Cut your stainless steel mesh with the wire cutters in sheets to fit the cage sides. Attach with wire or zip ties. Cut a separate two-foot x two-foot piece of mesh for the cage opening. Secure on one side with zip ties or wire, and use clips or more wire to hold the door closed.

Senin, 12 Juli 2010

How to Choose a Cage for a Cockatiel

Cockatiels are the smallest members of the cockatoo family. Unlike larger cockatoos, cockatiels are not prone to the behavioral problems and make excellent pets for beginners. They are extremely popular pets, and several color mutations are available, including various shades of white, grey and yellow. Although many inexpensive cages are available for cockatiels, these are not always large enough or practically designed. The steps below will guide you through the process of selecting an appropriate cage for a pet cockatiel.

Instructions

    1

    Choose a cage with plenty of room for the cockatiel to climb and play. Although larger is always better, the cage should be at least 20 inches wide by 20 inches deep. Cage height is not as important since cockatiels generally move from side to side rather than up and down within their cage. A minimum height for a cockatiel cage is approximately 20 inches.

    2

    Measure the amount of space between cage bars. The spacing should be no more than 3/4 inch wide for an adult cockatiel, and 1/2 inch for a baby cockatiel. Wider spacing can cause injury if the bird's head becomes caught between two bars. Cages designed for cockatiels will not have spacing greater than 3/4 inch, but if you are considering a non-specific bird cage or a cage for parrots, be sure to verify the bar spacing is correct.

    3

    Examine the cage's construction to verify that it will be easily cleaned, durable and sturdy. Stainless steel or powder-coated cages are the best choice for cockatiels, although a brass plated cage is also acceptable. Thin bars usually pose no problems, as cockatiels do not have powerful beaks. If the cage has a bottom grate, make sure that it slides out easily for daily cleaning.

    4

    Look for a cage that comes with a stand, preferably on wheels. Although cockatiel cages are usually not heavy, their size can make them awkward to move. A cage that includes a stand with wheels will be much easier to move from room to room, or outdoors for cleaning.

    5

    Check the latches on the cage doors to make sure they close securely. Although cockatiels are relatively easy to contain, they may escape through feeding or nest box doors that do not latch tightly. These doors are very common and usually not a reason to pass up an otherwise good cage. You can easily secure the extra doors using stainless steel quick-links.

Minggu, 11 Juli 2010

How to Build Breeder Boxes for Pigeons

How to Build Breeder Boxes for Pigeons

Breeder boxes, or nesting boxes, for pigeons are large, rectangular or cubic and open from one end. In large pigeon coops a whole wall is filled with nesting boxes, also called pigeon holes. Pigeon breeder boxes are very simple structures and can be attached to the wall in a coop, or even a house wall, for free-flying pigeons.

Instructions

    1

    Form two planks of 17-by-24-inch 3/4 inch plywood and two planks of 14-by-24-inch 3/4 inch plywood into a rectangular box with the 17-by-24-inch planks as the top and bottom, resting on the edges of the 14-by-24-inch planks to form corners.

    2

    Bead a line of glue on the edges of the top and bottom planks and clamp the box together. Leave it for two hours to dry. Unclamp the box.

    3

    Hammer a 1-inch nail spaced every 3 inches through the glued joints of the box. Place a 15.5-by-18.5-inch piece of 3/4 inch plywood over one end of the box and secure it in place with 1-inch nails hammered every 3 inches around the box edge.

    4

    Glue a piece of 16-inch 1-by-2 lumber at the top and bottom of the inside back of the box for screw anchors.

    5

    Position the nesting box in place in the pigeon coop. Drill four 3-inch screws through the screw anchors into the wall to mount the pigeon box.

Sabtu, 10 Juli 2010

How to Build Egg Laying Wooden Boxes for Chickens

How to Build Egg Laying Wooden Boxes for Chickens

Hens prefer to lay their eggs in safe, cozy and dark locations. If you dont provide chickens with a nest box, they will find their own spot, or just drop them as they go about their daily activities. By building them a place to lay their eggs, you are more likely to find the eggs and have them be still intact. This is a design for a simple nest box with an open front and low front edge to keep the straw and eggs within the box.

Instructions

    1

    Measure out and mark four squares on the plywood with a pencil. Each square should be equal in size and be large enough to fit your chickens. For reference a square of 14-by-14 inches is suitable for most average size chickens.

    2

    Measure out and mark the 2-by-2s. If you are building a 14-by-14-inch box then you will need three pieces of 2-by-2s measuring 14 inches each, and four pieces measuring 10 inches each.

    3

    Cut the plywood and 2-by-2s with the saw.

    4

    Attach two of the 14-inch 2-by-2s to a cut piece of plywood with the screws, one each along two opposite edges. You should only need to use two screws. The edges with the 14-inch 2-by-2s will be the top and bottom of the chicken box.

    5

    Attach the two 10-inch 2-by-2s to that same piece of plywood used in Step 4. Attach these pieces along the side edges perpendicular to the already attached 2-by-2 pieces. This will be the back wall of the nest box.

    6

    Attach the remaining 14-inch 2-by-2s to one edge of another piece of cut plywood. Attach the two remaining 10-inch 2-by-2s to the sides of this plywood, perpendicular to and touching the 14-inch piece already screwed in. This will be the floor of the nest box. The 14-inch edge will be at the bottom front of the nest box.

    7

    Lay the back wall down on the ground with the 2-by-2s face up. From there, you can attach the three pieces of plywood that do not have edges by screwing them in to the various 2-by-2s. Attach the floor piece last; remember the 14-inch edge should be at the bottom front of the nest box.

What Size Should a Cockatiel Cage Be?

What Size Should a Cockatiel Cage Be?

Cockatiels are relatives of the cockatoo, and hail from Australia. Breeders in Europe have maintained stocks of pet cockatiels since the mid 1800s. In the wild, cockatiels live in pairs or flocks of up to a dozen, though as pets, they are often kept singly. Your bird will be happiest if his cage is the proper size for his breed.

Function

    Decide how much time your cockatiel will spend in the cage in a 24-hour period. Birds that are to spend more time in their cages need a larger cage than birds who will only use the cage for sleeping at night.

Types

    Bird cages come in a variety of shapes as well as sizes. Cockatiels like to stay near the top of the cage, so a long, wide cage will benefit the bird more than a tall, skinny cage.

Features

    Bars should be no farther apart than 3/4 inch, to ensure the bird doesn't stick his head through and get stuck.
    The cage should have one or two perches. The bird's tail should brush the floor of the cage on the lowest perch, not drag on the floor or catch in the bars.
    A mix of horizontal and vertical bars encourage climbing.
    The cage should house one or two destructible bird toys. Leave the cage as clutter-free as possible.
    It should also have a removable plastic tray base for easy cleaning

Size

    The cage should have a depth of 18 to 50 inches, a width of 18 to 50 inches, and a height of 25 to 75 inches.

Considerations

    You do not want a cage that is too small nor too large. The cockatiel should be able to fully open its wings and flap without touching the sides of the cage. Cockatiels are prey animals, and a single bird in a too-large cage would be stressful to the bird.

Expert Insight

    Cockatiels need daily out-of-cage time for proper exercise and social interaction with you.

Jumat, 09 Juli 2010

How to Ship Mealworms

Mealworms are the grub of the darkling beetle and are commonly used by buyers as supplemental nutrition for wild or pet birds. Mealworms are high in protein and potassium and can be easily mixed with bird feed or offered to birds on their own. If you intend to ship mealworms, the process must be done carefully to ensure that the mealworms arrive at their destination alive and in good condition. If shipped improperly, mealworms have a chance of entering the pupae stage of their life cycle prior to arriving at the buyer's home. This will result in fewer usable mealworms and an unhappy customer.

Instructions

    1

    Count out the number of mealworms to be shipped. This is most easily done by calculating the mealworms' weight. If you know ahead of time how much a given number of mealworms weighs, you can use this information to calculate the approximate number of mealworms in each batch you ship.

    2

    Pack the mealworms into a light plastic container with holes cut into the lid or a small burlap bag. It is important to use breathable packaging so that the mealworms are able to get enough oxygen to survive the trip.

    3

    Use crumpled up newspaper as packing material for your worms. Newspaper will not hurt the mealworms and, because it is light, it will cut down on the shipping costs.

    4

    Add a small handful of bran flakes to the packing material. The bran flakes serve as food for the mealworms during the trip. You may also want to include a few additional grubs as some will inevitably die during shipping and you want the recipient to receive the full number of live mealworms that he purchased.

    5

    Include an instruction sheet informing the customer to feed the mealworms using bran flakes or oatmeal and to include fresh vegetables in the mealworms' container to provide them with moisture. Also inform the customer that storing her mealworms in the refrigerator will ensure that they do not begin to morph into pupae before she has an opportunity to use them. Mealworms will last around two weeks if they are properly refrigerated.

    6

    Ship the mealworms using overnight or 2-day air mail. The quicker the mealworms arrive at their destination, the higher chance they have of survival.

    7

    Schedule mealworm shipping for early in the week. This ensures that your mealworms arrive on schedule and are not held in a warehouse over the weekend where they could easily die or enter the next stage of their life cycle.

Selasa, 06 Juli 2010

African Grey Habitat

African Grey Habitat

According to TheAfricanGreyParrot.com, African greys are some of the most popular and charming exotic birds available. These large, highly intelligent birds require some specific care when they're kept as pets.

Features

    African greys reach an average of 12 inches in length, and feature silvery gray feathers and black beaks, with bright red or maroon tail feathers. These parrots are believed to be as intelligent as a 5-year-old child.

Geography

    African greys hail originally from the jungles of West and Central Africa, and are divided into two subspecies: Congo and Timneh.

Cage

    An African grey cage should be large enough for the bird to open its wings fully and move around. Larger cages provide better habitats for African greys. Good cages also include roof perches for out-of-cage time.

Toys

    According to Windy City Parrots, a proper parrot habitat should contain at least three perches and 10 toys for the birds to play with and chew on.

Entertainment

    African greys are sensitive and emotional, and require human contact and stimulation to keep them entertained. Owners should have birds out of their cages for several hours every day.

Senin, 05 Juli 2010

How to Build a Heat Lamp for Chicks

If you are going to get eggs and incubate them for hatching chicks, then you'll need a heat source. Assuming that you are going to hatch the chicks in a temperature-controlled room, a simple heat lamp will do. Here's how to make it.

Instructions

    1

    Test out your heat source. If you are using a Styrofoam incubator, depending on the size, you'll likely need a 40- or 60-watt lightbulb for your heat source. Try both bulbs and see which bulb maintains a temperature of between 99 and 102 degrees Fahrenheit. Place the thermometer inside and close the lid. Wait at least an hour and test your bulbs.

    2

    Set up your heat source. Once you have determined which wattage is best, set up your incubator with your heat source. Check the temperature every few hours to be sure it is maintaining a steady temperature with no more than a degree or two of fluctuation.

    3

    Check your humidity levels. The humidity should be between 50 % and 55 % relative humidity except for the last few days of incubation, where humidity levels can rise to 65 % relative humidity. Humidity is easy to check using a wet bulb thermometer and a conversion chart. Once you get your temperature and humidity levels regulated, you'll be all set to hatch chicks at home.

Sabtu, 03 Juli 2010

How to Make Wooden Bird Toys

How to Make Wooden Bird Toys

Wooden bird toys can run a bird owner into quite a bit of money, especially if the bird is a power chewer. Some of the larger birds can destroy a wooden bird toy in as little as a day, but most toys last at least a few weeks. Birds tend to become bored with nothing to do, and will pluck themselves naked, so keeping a supply of toys is an important part of the care of birds, particularly parrots.

Instructions

    1

    Determine the size of the wood and bead parts needed for your bird. The larger the bird, the larger the toy parts should be. Parts range in size from 1/4-inch pieces to 1 1/2-inch pieces. Purchase multicolored parts and Paulie rope or leather to put the toys together. Paulie rope is a type of rope made specifically for bird toys.

    2

    Plan the look of the toy. Choose the rope or leather pieces to hold the blocks and beads. Small birds are comfortable with toys that are no more the 4 to 5 inches in length, but larger birds will need something 12 to 18 or more inches in length. Take the size of the cage into consideration, and think about how much room the bird will have to move around in the cage.

    3

    Drill a hole large enough for the Paulie rope or leather stringing material in the center of the blocks. Some blocks may be pre-drilled. Drill holes in the main piece to hold the strings of wooden parts and beads. Thread the rope through the main piece of the toy and knot it well. The knots should be enough to keep the rope from sliding out of the main piece and need to be tied tightly, as most birds will untie the knots.

    4

    Thread wooden blocks and beads onto the rope or leather. Alternate colors and materials. You can even add leather pieces between the blocks. Once a string is full, knot the bottom or tie the Paulie rope or leather into knots or tie a stainless steel quick link (the kind that screws together) to the bottom to hold all of the parts on the rope or leather.

    5

    Drill a larger hole in the center of the main hanging piece. Thread stainless steel chain, leather or Paulie rope through the center hole. Connect the ends with a stainless steel quick link. The quick link can be unscrewed to fit over the bars of the cage or aviary, then screwed tightly together and makes a great toy hanger. If you are using chain, simply loop each end of the chain onto the quick link. If you are using Paulie rope or leather, knot each end of the main hanging material to the quick link.