Selasa, 30 Juli 2013

How to Bond With a Sun Conure

Many people are instantly attracted to the striking beauty of a sun conure, and this attraction often leads to an impulse purchase, instead of the careful research needed to be sure that this is the right bird for them. The sun conure can be a loving, comical and devoted companion, but the path to bonding is not a short one. Patience, understanding and the realization that training will be an on-going process (with several bites along the way), is the key to your best chance of successfully bringing this intelligent beauty into your life.

Instructions

How to Bond with a Sun Conure

    1

    Purchase a baby hand raised sun conure, as they are easier to bond with than an adult. You may have success with an adult, but it is generally more of a task to gain their trust, and you may have no way of knowing the bird's history regarding being handled by humans.

    2

    Give the bird a safe, quiet space to live in and time to settle in. Place the cage in a corner, if possible; this will give her a little more sense of security. Do not place her by a window, as there may be more sights, sounds and movement from outside to make her nervous.

    3

    Teach the sun conure to "step up," by calmly and slowly placing your hand near the bird, and saying "step up" while gently touching his chest. The bird may bite from fear or agitation. Do not flick his beak, hit or yell at him. Try to keep your hand in place, and try not to react to the bite. Give him the command once more. If he bites again, slowly pull your hand back and say "No." If the biting continues, turn your back and leave the room for several minutes. Once he succeeds at stepping up, give him a treat and cheerful praise.

    4

    Introduce your sun conure to the other people in your home. Sun conures often bond with only one member of the household, meaning that everyone else is apt to be bitten or screamed at upon coming near her. Attempt to train her to be handled by more than one person, but do not be surprised if this does not happen. Realize that your bird may choose someone else as her favorite; try not to take it personally.

    5

    Provide your sun conure with lots of toys; they all love to play and clown around. As you handle him more often, try laying him on his back in your hand, or on your lap. This is often one of the conure's favorite positions to play in, and if he allows you to do this, you will know you are gaining his trust. Make sure he has regular out of the cage time on his stand.

    6

    Make sure your sun conure gets 11 to 12 hours of uninterrupted sleep each night. Lack of sleep can make your bird very crabby, and less likely to feel like interacting with you. Give her a quiet space in order for her to nap during the day, as well.

    7

    Provide your bird with the proper nutrition each day. Sun conures need lots of fruits and vegetables in their diets, as well as conure or cockatiel seed mix, pelleted food and occasionally, a few nuts. If your bird is not fed properly, he may not feel well enough to bother with bonding. For a list of foods to offer, and foods to avoid, see the resources section.

How to Help Conures Stop Biting & Screaming

How to Help Conures Stop Biting & Screaming

Conures are delightful companions. Small parrots native to South America, there are many different varieties, a number of which have spectacular colored plumage. Not known as great talkers, they are great fun to watch and play with. They are affectionate and entertaining pets. Conures do have a reputation for being loud birds and can sometimes develop biting habits. If this happens with your conure, don't panic, and don't give up. There are some steps you can take to fix the situation.

Instructions

    1

    Rule out any medical problems with a trip to your avian veterinarian. When dealing with changes in a parrot's behavior, or even before embarking on a big training program, it is always good to rule out any medical problems. The screaming and/or biting may be a symptom of a health problem, or your parrot's way of telling you that something is wrong.

    2

    Look at what happens just before your conure engages in the problematic behavior. This will give you valuable clues to what is going on. Does your conure scream when you are about to leave the house? When you come home? Does he bite when you put your hand in his cage or when you try and return him to his cage? Knowing when the bird engages in the problematic behavior will help you figure out what is causing the behavior and how to get it to stop.

    3

    Notice what you are doing after the bird bites or screams. It is possible to unintentionally reinforce bad behavior by rewarding it. If the owners respond to bad behavior by giving the parrot a lot of attention, the conure may be learning that it likes what happens after it starts screaming. Birds don't always understand human tone or body language, and so may not know if they are being yelled at or scolded, and may simply relish the fact that they are getting attention. If, for instance, the conure doesn't want to go to its cage, and if it screams enough that you let it stay out, then you have taught the parrot that it can get what it wants by screaming. Make sure that you are not accidentally training your bird to misbehave.

    4

    Train your bird using positive reinforcement. Positive reinforcement involves rewarding the animal for engaging in desired behavior. Rewards can be a click from a clicker, or that combined with a favorite food treat. Negative reinforcement such as punishing when behavior is incorrect, is much less effective, and may simply result in a traumatized and scared bird, who is then more likely to bite and scream. Training a bird in desired behavior, or even training it to do tricks, and having it be able to achieve rewards and receive praise is good for the conure's overall demeanor and will improve confidence and cement the bond with the trainer. With less fear and stress in the conure's life, it is much less likely to engage in biting and screaming behaviors.

Great Blue Heron Classification

Great Blue Heron Classification

The great blue heron is a large, wading bird that is common throughout North and Central America. It stalks fish and frogs in the shallows of nearly any body of water and uses its long neck and powerful bill to snatch its prey.

Kingdom: Animalia

    Kingdom is the broadest classification assigned to living things. The kingdom Animalia contains all known animals, including the great blue heron. Animals are multicellular, do not create energy using photosynthesis and have cells that are not surrounded by a rigid cell wall.

Phylum: Chordata

    The great blue heron belongs to the phylum chordata. This phylum includes all animals with a backbone and spinal cord, including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish.

Class: Aves

    The class Aves contains the birds. All birds, including the great blue heron, are distinguished from other animals by the presence of feathers on their bodies.

Order: Ciconiiformes

    The order Ciconiiformes comprises birds that have long legs and large bills, including the storks, herons, ibises and egrets. Like most members of this order, the great blue heron uses its long legs for wading in shallow water and its large bill for catching small, aquatic animals.

Family: Ardeidae

    The family Ardeidae includes the herons, egrets and bitterns. These birds are separated from the other Ciconiiformes, because they hold their neck retracted, or curved, in flight. In contrast ibises, spoonbills and storks typically fly with their necks outstretched.

Genus: Ardea

    The great blue heron is considered a "typical heron" and belongs to the genus Ardea. The primary feature distinguishing these birds from other herons is their size, as they often exceed a meter in length. Within this genus, the great blue heron belongs to the species Ardea herodias.

Senin, 29 Juli 2013

Cockatiel Training Tips

Cockatiel Training Tips

Cockatiels are naturally happy and affectionate birds, although each bird is an individual and may have habits or personality traits that could be improved. Generally speaking, training cockatiels is not difficult, and both the owner and the bird will benefit from time spent training together.

Training your Cockatiel to Stop Screaming

    It's important for owners to realize that cockatiels are naturally noisy birds, so they don't make noise to annoy you. Once you understand that a bit of noise is normal, you may find that you enjoy your cockatiel more than ever before.

    While they are noisy birds, you can teach them to stop screaming. The best way to teach a cockatiel not to scream is by not running to him and giving him what he wants when he screams. If the bird is screaming to come out of his cage and you walk over and let him out, you are teaching him that when he screams, he gets what he wants.

    If you know that your cockatiel has enough food, water, toys and is not either hot or cold or sick, you don't have to run over the to him as soon as he asks for something. Instead, you should wait for the screaming to stop, and then you should be the one who initiates the contact. If you always allow your cockatiel to dictate when you do things, he will keep screaming, because that is what works.

Training Your Cockatiel Not to Bite

    Biting is a complaint made by some cockatiel owners, but you can train your bird not to bite you anymore. A cockatiel often bites because she has been taught that biting is an effective means of getting what she wants. For instance, if you go to put your cockatiel in her cage, and she bites you because she is unhappy and you take her back out, you are reinforcing the biting. If you continue to put the bird back regardless, you are showing that you are the boss and eventually, this behavior will stop. This is more easily taught when the bird is young, but can be taught, with patience, at any age.

Reinforcing Good Behavior

    It can be easy with these birds to unknowingly reinforce bad behavior such as screaming or biting, but you should make an effort to only reinforce positive behavior. When your bird goes into the cage without biting, you can praise him or even offer a small, healthy treat. This will establish a positive connection between bird and owner where the owner is the boss.

The Habitat of the Queen Alexandra's Birdwing Butterfly

The Habitat of the Queen Alexandra's Birdwing Butterfly

The Queen Alexandra's Birdwing butterfly is the largest butterfly in the world, and also the largest winged insect. At adulthood, the larger female's head and body length reaches up to 3.2 inches and the wingspan up to 12 inches. Male Birdwing butterflies have a bright yellow body with green and blue markings, while females are mainly brown with cream and white spots, a cream body and a red tuft of fur on the thorax.

Habitat

    Queen Alexandra's Birdwing butterfly is a very rare species. Its natural habitat is in northern Papua New Guinea, in valleys just east of the Owen Stanley Mountains. It is a tropical butterfly. Its preferred natural habitat includes lowland coastal rainforest.

Food Source

    During the caterpillar stage of life these butterflies eat their own eggshells after hatching. Then they consume the aristolochia plant, also known as the pipevine plant, which contains a poison that makes them distasteful to predators. As a caterpillar, it eats constantly. It will molt several times before going into the pupa stage. During this time, of about a month, it will not eat or drink but lives in a suspended state. This rare species feeds on the nectar of flowers. Queen Alexandra's Birdwing butterfly has a proboscis with which it sucks nectar from flowers. They rarely go down to earth, but rather spend their time in the canopies of forest trees.

Reproduction

    The Queen Alexandra's Birdwing butterfly relies on the aristolochia plant to reproduce. It is the only plant in their natural habitat where they will lay eggs. When their young hatch they can feed on the plant and protect themselves from predators. This species mates once then dies. Its butterfly stage lasts only three months.

Role in the Ecosystem

    Queen Alexandra's Birdwing butterflies are very important to their habitat. Since they spend most of their time in the canopies of trees, they can reach plants that are unattainable to other insects and animals. They help to pollinate these flowering plants. In the butterfly state, their brightly colored wings warn predators that they are poisonous.

Habitat Loss

    Since the Queen Alexandra's Birdwing butterfly's habitat is so limited, it is especially vulnerable to habitat loss. Some of the threats to its natural habitat are logging, agriculture and human settlement. According to the Natural History Museum of the U.K., as of 2010 this species' natural habitat is limited to 100 square kilometers (less than 65 square miles). Collectors pose another threat. They try to capture these rare butterflies and ship them to foreign countries. A specimen is often worth thousands of dollars. According to the American Museum of Natural History, the Birdwing butterflies are endangered. It is illegal to catch and sell them.

What's in the Name

    The Queen Alexandra's Birdwing butterfly was named after Queen Alexandra of Great Britain. It was discovered in 1906 by Mr. A. S. Meek, who shot a female butterfly out of the sky. According to the Natural History Museum's website, Meek then gave the butterfly to Lord Walter Rothchild who named it after the then-queen in 1907.

Minggu, 28 Juli 2013

How to Train a Parrot to Come to You

When you call a dog to come, you wait for the dog to walk in your direction. When you call a parrot, any number of things might occur based on whether or not your pet bird is trained properly. Since the pet can fly off, and it can then take hours to return him to his cage, you want to get this right.

Instructions

    1

    Train your pet parrot in the same location. As parrots get used to the place where they're trained, they become more comfortable with you and their surroundings.

    2

    Schedule training for the same time every day, and keep distractions to a minimum. If you're focused when you train your parrot to come, your parrot remains focused on the task at hand also.

    3

    Teach the parrot the most important first command, "step up," which is the same as "come" or "sit" is to a dog. Gently slide your hand against the parrot's stomach to encourage your pet to step onto your hand.

    4

    Reward the parrot each time with its favorite treat after it successfully steps up. If you both have a stressful session and the bird doesn't respond, give a treat before putting him in his cage.

    5

    Begin training the "come here" command after you're parrot consistently obeys the "step up" command. Train in the same location and offer the parrot his favorite treat.

    6

    Expand the length the bird travels during each training session. Each time use the command "come here" and offer him a treat when he arrives at the appointed destination.

    7

    Test your parrot's ability to come in flight by using the command "come here," and then say "step up" on his approach to your hand. Reward him with his favorite treat.

How to Get a Woodpecker to Leave

How to Get a Woodpecker to Leave

A woodpecker is a type of bird that has a sharp and pointy bill, which it uses to peck or drum wood. It does this to search for insects to eat, or to create a nest for itself. Woodpeckers often damage houses or trees, and the sound of their drumming can be annoying. Both federal and state law protect woodpeckers. The law does not allow people to trap or kill woodpeckers unless they obtain a permit from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service allowing them to do so.

Instructions

    1

    Address the problem immediately. The longer you allow a woodpecker to hang around, the more difficult it is to get it to leave, because it has formed the habit of drumming there.

    2

    Draw or attach owl eyes to a balloon and hang it in the drumming area. Create or purchase a falcon in flight and attach it. All birds are afraid of falcons. Move the falcon around so the woodpecker won't realize that it's a fake. These are temporary solutions that will be effective only as long as the woodpecker believes they pose a threat.

    3

    Install netting on your siding, leaving 3 inches between the net and the siding to ensure that the woodpecker can't cause damage through the netting. Netting is effective because it is invisible from a distance, and is a long-term solution to controlling woodpeckers.

    4

    Attach a handheld windmill to the woodpecker's drumming site. Ensure that it has reflective vanes and that they move freely.

    5

    Get rid of things that attract woodpeckers, such as insects or dead trees. Use a woodpecker repellent like pentachlorophenol. This substance also protects wood and repels insects. Purchase sticky bird repellents like Roost-no-More or Bird Stop. However, sticky repellents may run in the heat. Use a chemical repellent such as Thiram or Ro-pel.

    6

    Remove the siding where the woodpecker is drumming and place soft material or insulation behind it. This is effective in deadening the sound the woodpecker makes.

    7

    Display several aluminum foil strips 2 to 3 feet above the drumming location. Hang them on strings to sway in the wind so the motion will scare the birds away.

    8

    Make a lot of noise when you hear the woodpecker drumming. Clap loudly, shout or bang on pans and boards. Play very loud music in a window near the woodpecker's location to scare it away.

    9

    Attach a mirror to the siding where the woodpecker drums. Woodpeckers get scared if they see themselves in a mirror and won't hang around.

    10

    Obtain a federal permit from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to kill or trap the woodpecker if all other methods fail.